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Developing resources mostly for the new specification GCSE's, along with selected KS3, assessment and standalone resources.

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Developing resources mostly for the new specification GCSE's, along with selected KS3, assessment and standalone resources.
Non-Communicable Diseases and Correlation v Causation NEW 2016 Spec
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Non-Communicable Diseases and Correlation v Causation NEW 2016 Spec

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Lesson plan investigating non-communicable diseases and correlation v causation. Instructions and ideas for delivery are included in the notes section. I used post-it notes within the lesson for a group task, but the lesson can be delivered without. Starter - Students rank diseases in order from most to least deaths caused as of 2012 before identifying risk factors relating to these. Main 1 - Continuum of risk factors for students to rank from least impact on health to most impact. Post it notes were used for groups of students to rank their own ideas before feeding back as a class. This then leads into a table activity whereby students identify diseases as communicable or non communicable. Main 2 - Worked class example of correlation vs causation using pollen, ice cream and hay fever as a way of introducing the idea. Students grasp that evidence is needed to imply causation through correlation, and some ridiculous examples are used to highlight this idea before students explain evidence for 3 non communicable diseases. Feeds into a data worksheet task on link between liver disease and alcohol consumption. Plenary - Students come up with 5 ideas on how to minimise the risk of developing one of the non communicable diseases covered in the lesson. Objectives: GOOD – LIST some risk factors that are linked to an increased rate of a disease. GREAT – DECIDE whether a link is causal or not. EPIC – DRAW conclusions on disease from given data As always any feedback is appreciated :)
Making Salts (Insoluble Bases)
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Making Salts (Insoluble Bases)

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A practical lesson looking at making salts from an insoluble base. I used Copper Oxide and Sulphuric Acid for the lesson, where the students fill in the equipment list and follow a method to make Copper Sulphate. Aimed at middle ability learners, but can be differentiated up/down if needed through the use of method/questions on worksheet. Method is on the worksheet and additional information is in the notes section of the PPT. Starter - Students write down their own examples of salt making reactions involving metals, metal oxides, metal carbonates and acids. Can add in symbol equations as a challenge task for student challenge. Main - Introduction to the experiment by describing the reaction of insoluble salts with acid. Students copy down the equipment list onto their worksheet before following the method on the worksheet to react Copper Oxide with Sulphuric Acid. During the practical, there are 6 questions to answer relating to the experiment to complete. Plenary - Naming salts task on the worksheet using the key from the starter as help. Symbol equations are written underneath as a student challenge task. Objectives: GOOD – NAME salts formed between a metal oxide/hydroxide and an acid GREAT – DESCRIBE a method to prepare a dry soluble salt from and insoluble substance and an acid EPIC – EXPLAIN why the reaction between a base and dilute acid is a neutralisation reaction As always, any feedback is welcome :)
Growing Bacteria NEW 2016 GCSE
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Growing Bacteria NEW 2016 GCSE

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Growing Bacteria in the lab for the New GCSE spec. Simple lesson looking at students growing bacterial cultures. Agar plates are needed and there is a teachers slide in the PPT detailing the preparation for the lesson if needed. Starter - Students to draw the first 4 generations of bacteria as an introduction to BINARY FISSION before using this as a tool to describe exponential growth after 10, 20, 30 and 50 divisions. Main - Practical activity whereby students grow cultures using swabs from areas of interest to them. All information is on the practical sheet and students are required to work independently although this can be tweaked to suit your class. After the practical students answer questions on the worksheet relating to the lesson. Plenary - Class feedback/discussion of answers to practical questions followed by a 3,2,1 plenary to ensure students are reflecting on their work. OBJECTIVES: GOOD – FOLLOW rules needed to prepare an uncontaminated culture GREAT – EXPLAIN why it is important to use an uncontaminated culture to investigate bacterial growth EPIC – SUGGEST how to measure the growth of bacteria and discuss uncertainty As always, any feedback is welcome :)
Power, Efficiency and Sankey Diagrams
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Power, Efficiency and Sankey Diagrams

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Worksheet which gives 'mild', 'medium' and 'spicy' choices for calculations on working out power using the triangle formula, then follow on questions relating to efficiency calculations and the drawing of Sankey diagrams using either squared or graph paper which are differentiated.
Circulatory System
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Circulatory System

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A worksheet depicting the circulatory system. Students have to start at the top left of the worksheet, describing the process at each stage of the circulatory system using the key words at the bottom of the sheet
Heart, Blood Vessels, CHD, Blood revision booklet
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Heart, Blood Vessels, CHD, Blood revision booklet

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Originally for medium/low ability students, but can be differentiated. Revision booklet for the topics mentioned. Booklet has heart to label, flow diagram gaps to detail movement of blood through the heart, Blood vessel structure, function, features table to fill in, CHD DART activity, blood components table task and application questions at the end of the booklet.
Newton's Laws of Motion Information Sheets/Revision
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Newton's Laws of Motion Information Sheets/Revision

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Information sheets describing Newton's 3 Laws of Motion with examples. I have also uploaded a simple worksheet for students to use when interpreting the sheets, although this was used as a quick fix for a lesson. The sheets can be used as a revision aid or as placemats for students to use when investigating the 3 Laws.
Separating Mixtures
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Separating Mixtures

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KS3 simple practical lesson involving separating mixtures, with possibility to expand to a more in depth practical activity. Also recaps definitions of Element, Compounds and Mixtures. Equipment Needed – Flour, Sugar, Beakers, Water, Filter Paper, stirring rod or spoon and evaporating dish (Bunsen burner if evaporating in lesson and not left overnight). Additional Information is in the notes section on each slide. Starter - Picture task for students to identify substances/objects as mixtures or not. Main 1 - Recap of Element, Compound and Mixture through 5 picture puzzles for students to identify. This is followed by students writing definitions for each, before self assessing against a model answer. Main 2 - Practical activity. Students use a hint sheet to solve a problem of sugar mixed in with flour. You can substitute a colleagues name into the slide to make it more engaging. Plenary - Students are given 4 mixture examples (Iron Filings and Flour, Sugar and Water, Rice and Kidney Beans, Sand and Water) along with an equipment list, some needed and some not. They have to identify how they would separate each mixture using only the equipment provided. You could also complete this as a practical activity carousel using the 4 mixtures. Objectives are below: GOOD – SEPARATE different substances using different techniques. GREAT – DESCRIBE particle arrangements in mixtures. EPIC – EXPLAIN why and how to separate different mixtures using different techniques. As always any feedback is welcome :)
Energy Demands - Nuclear and Coal New 2016 GCSE
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Energy Demands - Nuclear and Coal New 2016 GCSE

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Lesson looking at energy demands are met (focussing on USA and China) through the use of fossil fuels (coal) and nuclear power, detailing how each method generates electricity in power plants. This is taught through 3 youtube video links and accompanied worksheet. Last slide looks at Biofuel as an alternative energy source, discussing the idea of this fuel being carbon neutral. Instruction ideas for the lesson are in the notes section of each slide. Starter - Question with pictures asking how Coal, Oil and Gas are formed. Main 1 - 3 information slides to promote discussion, looking at energy demand in various countries before focussing on how energy demands are met in the US and China and why their energy usage is so high. Main 2 - Worksheet activity whereby students watch youtube clips to identify the process of making energy through Coal and Nuclear power. Plenary - Students to evaluate the use of biofuel as a carbon neutral energy source. Objectives: GOOD – IDENTIFY where countries get their energy from and what they use it on. GREAT – OUTLINE the operations of nuclear and coal power stations. EPIC – EXPLAIN why biofuels can be considered Carbon Neutral. As always, any feedback is welcome :)
Particle Model
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Particle Model

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Complete tutorial/lesson looking at the particle model involving solids, liquids and gasses with supplementary key learning points detailed under relevant slides. PowerPoint looks at the characteristics of each state and also what happens to the particles when they change state. Has a starter and plenary on the PowerPoint.
Microscopes - Observing Cells KS3
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Microscopes - Observing Cells KS3

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Simple "all in one lesson" on one PPT with a practical task of preparing a microscope slide using an onion. Equipment needed: Onion – Knife – Cutting Tile – Staining liquid (Iodine) – Microscopes – Microscope slides – Cover Slips – Tweezers. Instructions of activities in the notes section of each slide. Starter - 2 questions. Why is it useful to use a microscope to view an object? Why can’t we just use a magnifying glass? Main 1 - Light microscope. Slide 3 can be printed out for students to label the parts of a microscope or you can complete a back to board drawing with 2 students. Students discuss in pairs what they think each microscope part does. Main 2 - Practical demo. I have not included a method sheet here as I like to complete the practical as a demonstration for the students to watch as they write their own method to the practical. There is an equipment list and very simple method on the last slide. Extension - Students calculate total magnification from 3 given problems. Plenary - Students look at 4 objects which have been magnified and guess what they are. Objectives: GOOD – USE a light microscope to observe a prepared slide GREAT – EXPLAIN how to use a microscope to observe a cell OUTSTANDING – CALCULATE magnification of a cell
Developing Drugs/Placebo Effect New 2016 GCSE
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Developing Drugs/Placebo Effect New 2016 GCSE

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Double lesson and resources looking at teaching the stages and procedures for how drugs are developed along with investigating placebo effect. Includes a simple caffeine experiment at the end of the lesson putting in to practice the learning from the lesson. Additional resources needed include 2 types of soft drink (I used normal and decaff cola) and plastic cups for each student along with 30cm rulers. Additional guidance included in the notes section of each slide. The lesson is designed to span over a double lesson, but can be delivered in 1 if edited or if pace is quick. Starter - Question asking students if they would volunteer for a clinical trial. Moves on to asking students to estimate the overall cost for developing a new drug before briefly investigating the costs involved within this. Main - Students read information sheet and answer questions relating to the stages involved in drug development, placebo effect and drug safety. Plenary - Experiment putting into practice their learning by completing a simple experiment into effects of caffeine on reaction time (ruler drop test). Collate class data and discuss. Extend - Link to video on placebo effect from BBC Horizon documentary GOOD – STATE the procedures used to trial a new drug in the correct order GREAT – DESCRIBE how a double-blind trial is carried out EPIC – EXPLAIN why each procedure in drug testing and trialling is used As always any feedback is greatly appreciated :)
Plant Tissues and Organs New 2016 GCSE
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Plant Tissues and Organs New 2016 GCSE

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Lesson on Plant Tissues and Organs for new GCSE 2016 spec. Aimed at low ability Y10 class and can be completed with/without microscope access. Additional information on notes section of each slide. Starter - Students label the parts of a flower and possibly describe what each part does. Main - Feedback and building on knowledge to describe the function of plant organs before either drawing leaf and xylem/phloem structure through a microscope or from pictures using drawing memory games. Finished off with a quick information hunt to develop knowledge of plant tissues. Plenary - Pop quiz on knowledge gained throughout the lesson. Lesson Objectives: GOOD – RECOGNISE examples of plant organs and state their functions GREAT – STATE the functions of different plant tissues EPIC – DESCRIBE how plant organs are involved in the transport system As always, feedback is welcome :)
Breathing and Gas Exchange 2016 GCSE
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Breathing and Gas Exchange 2016 GCSE

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Lesson plan and simple worksheet for Breathing and Gas Exchange for the new GCSE spec. Aimed at my low ability year 10 class. The lesson features a high amount of discussion with the class as I was interested in developing this aspect of their learning both with myself and each other. Instructions are in the notes section of each slide. Starter - Label the parts of the gas exchange system as a KS3 recap. Main - Using words to describe alveoli structure as a building block to develop ideas around why it is sack shaped. Students then complete short gap fill exercise and do a simple data task looking at % of gas present during inhalation and expiration. Picture task for students to draw the alveoli either as a memory game or describing game in pairs as a way to introduce adaptations and build on description/discussion skills. Plenary - Students use the different word banks to answer the WALT question "How does oxygen get into the body?" They can then feedback to the class. OBJECTIVES: GOOD – LIST the main parts of the gas exchange system GREAT – STATE what happens at the alveoli relating to gas percentages EPIC – DESCRIBE how alveoli are adapted for gas exchange As always feedback is appreciated :)
Cells topic formative assessment
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Cells topic formative assessment

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Three different level laddered assessments (levels 3-8 and SEN/Low Ability) covering the cell topic (Animal/Plant Cells, Specialised Cells, Stem Cells and Prokaryotic/Eukaryotic Cells)
Antibiotic Resistance and Painkillers NEW 2016 GCSE Biology Spec
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Antibiotic Resistance and Painkillers NEW 2016 GCSE Biology Spec

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Antibiotic Resistance and Painkiller lesson for new 2016 GCSE specification. No extra resources needed - This lesson has opportunities for student discussion and also effective questioning. The lesson breaks down as follows: Starter - Students suggest definitions and examples of key terms (Antibiotic - Antiseptic - Antibodies - Analgesics - Disinfectant) before being given meanings. Main 1 - Students explore the difference between painkillers and antibiotics before recapping how bacteria make us ill - plenty of discussion and questioning opportunity before quick 3 question "show you know" whiteboard plenary and thought cartoon linking on to antibiotic resistance. Main 2 - Students are taken step by step through the process of antibiotic resistance with animated slides of 3 coloured dots representing weak to resistant bacteria (Green - weak. Orange - Middling resistance. Red - Resistant). After this students attempt the GREAT objective in their books as a written task. Again, encouragement of discussion and reading out of answers is a feature of this part of the lesson, and students will look to refine their answer through this process. Plenary - Newspaper/Internet headlines relating to development of resistant bacteria and lack of new discoveries coupled with now increased funding for research in to new antibiotics. These help inform the plenary discussing potential problems for human and livestock moving forward. Objectives are below. As always, any constructive feedback is welcomed :) GOOD – DESCRIBE the difference between antibiotics and painkillers. GREAT – DESCRIBE what is meant by antibiotic resistance. EPIC – EXPLAIN why scientists are working hard to develop new classes of antibiotics.
Making Salts (Metal and Acid) 2016 GCSE
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Making Salts (Metal and Acid) 2016 GCSE

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Practical/Demonstration lesson looking at the reaction between a metal and acid. I have used zinc/magnesium and sulphuric/hydrochloric acid, but has been planned as such, that you can easily substitute your own into the lesson. Equipment list is on the PPT and method in the notes section of the teacher slide. Starter - Students to identify why the words in different equations are coloured red/green/blue (to signify pH) before recapping the definition of a salt. Main - Using the worksheet, students write an equipment list and method for the practical whilst the teacher demonstrates. Can also be used to have students complete practical themselves as method is on the PPT notes section. Questions on the worksheet are there for students to complete during this activity. EXT of students identifying their own examples of metal/acid reactions Plenary - 5 true or false questions to consolidate the learning of the lesson. Objectives: GOOD – RECALL the definition of a salt and equation for a metal reacting with an acid GREAT – DESCRIBE how to make a salt by reacting a metal with an acid EPIC – WRITE balanced symbol equations for a reaction of a metal and acid Information for the lesson is written in the notes section of each slide. As always, any feedback is welcome :)
Electrolysis Introduction NEW GCSE 2016 AQA
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Electrolysis Introduction NEW GCSE 2016 AQA

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Electrolysis lesson looking at introducing students to the set up of electrolysis and the underlying ideas involved, including a quick recap of ionic compounds, metallic, non-metallic charges and word/symbol equations. From here, students develop an understanding of the origin of the word "electrolysis" and label the parts involved before describing the movement of ions and finally writing half equations: Starter - Students are reminded of the formula of ionic substances through the use of the starter questions. From here, it is important that they understand the charges of metal and non metal ions as a basic principle to apply later in the lesson Intro/Recap -Building on from the starter, students familiarise themselves with word and symbol equations from previous topics. Main 1 - Youtube link in the notes section used to introduce electrolysis whilst introducing the origin of the word from ancient greek. Students then attempt tasks 1 + 2 on the worksheet before self-assessing their work. Main 2 -Introduces half equations to the students in the form of a worked example. The example can then be used to help students complete task 3, which is writing half equations for the electrolysis of 3 basic ionic compounds and 1 challenge compound. Plenary - Quick true of false activity summarising some learning points from the lesson. Objectives:4 – WRITE a word equation to describe electrolysis 5 – DESCRIBE electrolysis in terms of movement of ions 6 – PREDICT the products at each electrode from electrolysis of a molten ionic compound (and complete a balanced half symbol equation) Additional information is written in the notes section of each slide. As always, and feedback is appreciated :)
AQA B7 Ecology Unit Organiser + Glossary (Trilogy and Triple)
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AQA B7 Ecology Unit Organiser + Glossary (Trilogy and Triple)

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A unit organiser for AQA B7 Ecology Unit Organiser - both Combined Trilogy and Biology Single Science (Triple). This organiser contains: Lesson titles in Chronological order of teaching across the unit 3 Key Ideas to explore within the lesson - These can be used as lesson outcomes A RAG box for students to review their understanding of the lesson Units split into “teachable” chunks A full glossary of Key Terms for each part of the unit The idea is to print each section on A5 for students to stick in prior to beginning the unit. They can then regularly reflect back to the organiser throughout the topic and as a signpost for revision/lessons missed. I also have the students highlight the key terms we cover as we meet them in the lesson, either as a starter or plenary There are organisers available for the whole of the AQA Trilogy Combined Science and Single Science course - full bundle can be accessed here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/resource-12573760