Hero image

Rossydunn's Shop

Developing resources mostly for the new specification GCSE's, along with selected KS3, assessment and standalone resources.

58Uploads

79k+Views

77k+Downloads

Developing resources mostly for the new specification GCSE's, along with selected KS3, assessment and standalone resources.
Making Salts (Insoluble Bases)
rossydunn

Making Salts (Insoluble Bases)

(0)
A practical lesson looking at making salts from an insoluble base. I used Copper Oxide and Sulphuric Acid for the lesson, where the students fill in the equipment list and follow a method to make Copper Sulphate. Aimed at middle ability learners, but can be differentiated up/down if needed through the use of method/questions on worksheet. Method is on the worksheet and additional information is in the notes section of the PPT. Starter - Students write down their own examples of salt making reactions involving metals, metal oxides, metal carbonates and acids. Can add in symbol equations as a challenge task for student challenge. Main - Introduction to the experiment by describing the reaction of insoluble salts with acid. Students copy down the equipment list onto their worksheet before following the method on the worksheet to react Copper Oxide with Sulphuric Acid. During the practical, there are 6 questions to answer relating to the experiment to complete. Plenary - Naming salts task on the worksheet using the key from the starter as help. Symbol equations are written underneath as a student challenge task. Objectives: GOOD – NAME salts formed between a metal oxide/hydroxide and an acid GREAT – DESCRIBE a method to prepare a dry soluble salt from and insoluble substance and an acid EPIC – EXPLAIN why the reaction between a base and dilute acid is a neutralisation reaction As always, any feedback is welcome :)
Plant Tissues and Organs New 2016 GCSE
rossydunn

Plant Tissues and Organs New 2016 GCSE

(0)
Lesson on Plant Tissues and Organs for new GCSE 2016 spec. Aimed at low ability Y10 class and can be completed with/without microscope access. Additional information on notes section of each slide. Starter - Students label the parts of a flower and possibly describe what each part does. Main - Feedback and building on knowledge to describe the function of plant organs before either drawing leaf and xylem/phloem structure through a microscope or from pictures using drawing memory games. Finished off with a quick information hunt to develop knowledge of plant tissues. Plenary - Pop quiz on knowledge gained throughout the lesson. Lesson Objectives: GOOD – RECOGNISE examples of plant organs and state their functions GREAT – STATE the functions of different plant tissues EPIC – DESCRIBE how plant organs are involved in the transport system As always, feedback is welcome :)
Plant and Animal Cells KS3
rossydunn

Plant and Animal Cells KS3

(1)
Structured lesson looking at Animal/Plant cells and their organelles. Needs some prior prep with printing and sticking up organelle information around the classroom before the lesson. Opportunity to differentiate and allow students to build on knowledge bit by bit throughout the lesson. All additional instructions are in the notes section of each slide. Starter - Give me 10. Students write 10 words relating to cells. This acts to gauge prior knowledge. Main 1 - Paired drawing task where Student A (facing the board) has to describe to Student B (who is facing away from the board) what to draw. After you have used questioning to get the names of the organelles, students can be given the picture of the cell to stick in. Main 2 - Information Hunt. Give students the organelle table to fill in – cut out the organelle information and stick/hide them around the classroom so students have to go and find the information to complete their table. You can either cut the name with the definition or stick the definition and the name separate. Main 3 - Analogies. Students are given 2 examples of analogies before being tasked to come up with their own for each organelle. Can extend to 2 or 3 different examples for each organelle if necessary. Plenary - Make a prediction questions... What would happen to a plant cell if we removed the chloroplasts? What would happen to animals if their cells had a cell wall? What do you think we will study next lesson? Objectives: GOOD – NAME the ORGANELLES found in animal and plant cells GREAT – DESCRIBE the functions of each main ORGANELLE OUTSTANDING – EXPLAIN organelle functions using analogies Thank you
Microscopes 2016 GCSE
rossydunn

Microscopes 2016 GCSE

(0)
Depending on your structure, this could be a practical lesson or A theory one. The practical lesson involves students prepare Onion and Cheek cells to study through a microscope. Alternatively, you could skip that part and have the students work on the magnification calculation sheet. Or you could do both! Additional notes giving ideas and hints for activities within the lesson are in the notes sections of the slides. Equipment needed - Onion – Knife – Cutting Tile – Staining liquid (Iodine) – Microscopes – Microscope slides – Cover Slips – Tweezers – Cotton Swabs Starter - Students identify objects zoomed in through a microscope. Main 1 - Students discuss the parts of a microscope before preparing onion and cheek cells to study under a microscope. Main 2 - Students then move on to calculate magnification from the differentiated worksheet (Answers provided) Plenary - Students then discuss the difference between magnification and resolution with the help of a picture as a prompt. Objectives: GOOD – USE a light microscope GREAT – USE the formula Magnification = Size of Image/Size of real object OUTSTANDING – DESCRIBE the difference between magnification and resolution Hope you enjoy :)
Breathing and Gas Exchange 2016 GCSE
rossydunn

Breathing and Gas Exchange 2016 GCSE

(2)
Lesson plan and simple worksheet for Breathing and Gas Exchange for the new GCSE spec. Aimed at my low ability year 10 class. The lesson features a high amount of discussion with the class as I was interested in developing this aspect of their learning both with myself and each other. Instructions are in the notes section of each slide. Starter - Label the parts of the gas exchange system as a KS3 recap. Main - Using words to describe alveoli structure as a building block to develop ideas around why it is sack shaped. Students then complete short gap fill exercise and do a simple data task looking at % of gas present during inhalation and expiration. Picture task for students to draw the alveoli either as a memory game or describing game in pairs as a way to introduce adaptations and build on description/discussion skills. Plenary - Students use the different word banks to answer the WALT question "How does oxygen get into the body?" They can then feedback to the class. OBJECTIVES: GOOD – LIST the main parts of the gas exchange system GREAT – STATE what happens at the alveoli relating to gas percentages EPIC – DESCRIBE how alveoli are adapted for gas exchange As always feedback is appreciated :)
Separating Mixtures
rossydunn

Separating Mixtures

(0)
KS3 simple practical lesson involving separating mixtures, with possibility to expand to a more in depth practical activity. Also recaps definitions of Element, Compounds and Mixtures. Equipment Needed – Flour, Sugar, Beakers, Water, Filter Paper, stirring rod or spoon and evaporating dish (Bunsen burner if evaporating in lesson and not left overnight). Additional Information is in the notes section on each slide. Starter - Picture task for students to identify substances/objects as mixtures or not. Main 1 - Recap of Element, Compound and Mixture through 5 picture puzzles for students to identify. This is followed by students writing definitions for each, before self assessing against a model answer. Main 2 - Practical activity. Students use a hint sheet to solve a problem of sugar mixed in with flour. You can substitute a colleagues name into the slide to make it more engaging. Plenary - Students are given 4 mixture examples (Iron Filings and Flour, Sugar and Water, Rice and Kidney Beans, Sand and Water) along with an equipment list, some needed and some not. They have to identify how they would separate each mixture using only the equipment provided. You could also complete this as a practical activity carousel using the 4 mixtures. Objectives are below: GOOD – SEPARATE different substances using different techniques. GREAT – DESCRIBE particle arrangements in mixtures. EPIC – EXPLAIN why and how to separate different mixtures using different techniques. As always any feedback is welcome :)
Non-Communicable Diseases and Correlation v Causation NEW 2016 Spec
rossydunn

Non-Communicable Diseases and Correlation v Causation NEW 2016 Spec

(0)
Lesson plan investigating non-communicable diseases and correlation v causation. Instructions and ideas for delivery are included in the notes section. I used post-it notes within the lesson for a group task, but the lesson can be delivered without. Starter - Students rank diseases in order from most to least deaths caused as of 2012 before identifying risk factors relating to these. Main 1 - Continuum of risk factors for students to rank from least impact on health to most impact. Post it notes were used for groups of students to rank their own ideas before feeding back as a class. This then leads into a table activity whereby students identify diseases as communicable or non communicable. Main 2 - Worked class example of correlation vs causation using pollen, ice cream and hay fever as a way of introducing the idea. Students grasp that evidence is needed to imply causation through correlation, and some ridiculous examples are used to highlight this idea before students explain evidence for 3 non communicable diseases. Feeds into a data worksheet task on link between liver disease and alcohol consumption. Plenary - Students come up with 5 ideas on how to minimise the risk of developing one of the non communicable diseases covered in the lesson. Objectives: GOOD – LIST some risk factors that are linked to an increased rate of a disease. GREAT – DECIDE whether a link is causal or not. EPIC – DRAW conclusions on disease from given data As always any feedback is appreciated :)
Making Salts (Metal and Acid) 2016 GCSE
rossydunn

Making Salts (Metal and Acid) 2016 GCSE

(0)
Practical/Demonstration lesson looking at the reaction between a metal and acid. I have used zinc/magnesium and sulphuric/hydrochloric acid, but has been planned as such, that you can easily substitute your own into the lesson. Equipment list is on the PPT and method in the notes section of the teacher slide. Starter - Students to identify why the words in different equations are coloured red/green/blue (to signify pH) before recapping the definition of a salt. Main - Using the worksheet, students write an equipment list and method for the practical whilst the teacher demonstrates. Can also be used to have students complete practical themselves as method is on the PPT notes section. Questions on the worksheet are there for students to complete during this activity. EXT of students identifying their own examples of metal/acid reactions Plenary - 5 true or false questions to consolidate the learning of the lesson. Objectives: GOOD – RECALL the definition of a salt and equation for a metal reacting with an acid GREAT – DESCRIBE how to make a salt by reacting a metal with an acid EPIC – WRITE balanced symbol equations for a reaction of a metal and acid Information for the lesson is written in the notes section of each slide. As always, any feedback is welcome :)
Reactivity Series New 2016 Spec
rossydunn

Reactivity Series New 2016 Spec

(0)
Reactivity series lesson with practical/demo opportunity involving metals and their reaction with water/hydrochloric acid. It is aimed at middle ability learners, but can be differentiated through challenge involving the worksheet and written word/symbol/ionic equations. Practical task can be flexible with the metals used, as their reactions are grouped for ease. Starter – Students to list the reactivity of the given metals based on their previous knowledge. Correct order then given for the reactivity series from the starter for pupils to self assess. Questioning opportunity to get students as to the importance of the reactivity series in their everyday life. Main - Demonstration/Practical Opportunity of metal reactions with hydrochloric acid. You don’t need all of the metals in the reactivity series to carry this out, as reaction descriptions can be grouped. Students then write down the observations in a table worksheet. Can also demonstrate the production of Hydrogen gas using a lit splint. Plenary - Students answer questions relating to uses of metals based on their reactivity. Can be done using whiteboards, as a discussion, think-pair-share, any plenary activity that consolidates their learning. GOOD – WRITE word equations for metals in the reactivity series and their reactions with Oxygen, Water and Acid GREAT – As above but also balancing symbol equations EPIC – JUSTIFY the uses of metals in the reactivity series based on their reactivity As always, any feedback is welcome :)
Variables and graphs mini assessment
rossydunn

Variables and graphs mini assessment

(1)
3 sections with questions on identifying independent and dependent variables, exam style questions on graph skills before building up to students plotting data onto their own graphs.
Reproduction
rossydunn

Reproduction

(5)
Carousel activity looking at different animals and how they reproduce. Pupils have to use the different resources at the different stations to fill in their info sheet. Each station will have a particular rule to obey. E.G. Only 1 person can talk. Nice 'what are the odds' poster at the end detailing the chances of us being here, from Ali Binazar.
Circulatory System
rossydunn

Circulatory System

(3)
A worksheet depicting the circulatory system. Students have to start at the top left of the worksheet, describing the process at each stage of the circulatory system using the key words at the bottom of the sheet
Voltage in series and parallel circuits
rossydunn

Voltage in series and parallel circuits

(1)
A practical lesson which allows pupils to follow step-by-step instructions in order to complete an investigation into the difference in voltage between parallel and series circuits. All instructions are on the PowerPoint as well as a mini-starter, a 'set your own homework' plenary and questions relating to the lesson. Apparatus (Per Group) - Power Pack, Wires, Croc Clips, 3 Bulbs, Voltmeter.
Heart, Blood Vessels, CHD, Blood revision booklet
rossydunn

Heart, Blood Vessels, CHD, Blood revision booklet

(1)
Originally for medium/low ability students, but can be differentiated. Revision booklet for the topics mentioned. Booklet has heart to label, flow diagram gaps to detail movement of blood through the heart, Blood vessel structure, function, features table to fill in, CHD DART activity, blood components table task and application questions at the end of the booklet.
Newton's Laws of Motion Information Sheets/Revision
rossydunn

Newton's Laws of Motion Information Sheets/Revision

(0)
Information sheets describing Newton's 3 Laws of Motion with examples. I have also uploaded a simple worksheet for students to use when interpreting the sheets, although this was used as a quick fix for a lesson. The sheets can be used as a revision aid or as placemats for students to use when investigating the 3 Laws.
Microscopes - Observing Cells KS3
rossydunn

Microscopes - Observing Cells KS3

(0)
Simple "all in one lesson" on one PPT with a practical task of preparing a microscope slide using an onion. Equipment needed: Onion – Knife – Cutting Tile – Staining liquid (Iodine) – Microscopes – Microscope slides – Cover Slips – Tweezers. Instructions of activities in the notes section of each slide. Starter - 2 questions. Why is it useful to use a microscope to view an object? Why can’t we just use a magnifying glass? Main 1 - Light microscope. Slide 3 can be printed out for students to label the parts of a microscope or you can complete a back to board drawing with 2 students. Students discuss in pairs what they think each microscope part does. Main 2 - Practical demo. I have not included a method sheet here as I like to complete the practical as a demonstration for the students to watch as they write their own method to the practical. There is an equipment list and very simple method on the last slide. Extension - Students calculate total magnification from 3 given problems. Plenary - Students look at 4 objects which have been magnified and guess what they are. Objectives: GOOD – USE a light microscope to observe a prepared slide GREAT – EXPLAIN how to use a microscope to observe a cell OUTSTANDING – CALCULATE magnification of a cell
Nanotechnology
rossydunn

Nanotechnology

(0)
Lesson looking at different uses of nanotechnology. Lesson activity depicted on the PowerPoint. The sunscreen article is higher level, providing differentiation. Nanoscale and web link help pupils understand the relative size of nanotechnology.
Electrolysis Introduction NEW GCSE 2016 AQA
rossydunn

Electrolysis Introduction NEW GCSE 2016 AQA

(0)
Electrolysis lesson looking at introducing students to the set up of electrolysis and the underlying ideas involved, including a quick recap of ionic compounds, metallic, non-metallic charges and word/symbol equations. From here, students develop an understanding of the origin of the word "electrolysis" and label the parts involved before describing the movement of ions and finally writing half equations: Starter - Students are reminded of the formula of ionic substances through the use of the starter questions. From here, it is important that they understand the charges of metal and non metal ions as a basic principle to apply later in the lesson Intro/Recap -Building on from the starter, students familiarise themselves with word and symbol equations from previous topics. Main 1 - Youtube link in the notes section used to introduce electrolysis whilst introducing the origin of the word from ancient greek. Students then attempt tasks 1 + 2 on the worksheet before self-assessing their work. Main 2 -Introduces half equations to the students in the form of a worked example. The example can then be used to help students complete task 3, which is writing half equations for the electrolysis of 3 basic ionic compounds and 1 challenge compound. Plenary - Quick true of false activity summarising some learning points from the lesson. Objectives:4 – WRITE a word equation to describe electrolysis 5 – DESCRIBE electrolysis in terms of movement of ions 6 – PREDICT the products at each electrode from electrolysis of a molten ionic compound (and complete a balanced half symbol equation) Additional information is written in the notes section of each slide. As always, and feedback is appreciated :)
Cells topic formative assessment
rossydunn

Cells topic formative assessment

(0)
Three different level laddered assessments (levels 3-8 and SEN/Low Ability) covering the cell topic (Animal/Plant Cells, Specialised Cells, Stem Cells and Prokaryotic/Eukaryotic Cells)
Friction & Drag Force (air resistance) 2 lessons
rossydunn

Friction & Drag Force (air resistance) 2 lessons

(0)
Double lesson with easy practical investigation of friction of different shoes/trainers(Need ruler, ramps and different shoes). Lessons follow a thematic approach with students learning about the Nike research facility and the scientists that work there, relating forces and friction to their work. In the second lesson, students will learn about drag force and apply their understanding of both lessons to use success criteria to produce a scientific report for Nike on the two subject areas. Students then have to present their data and answer questions on the experiment. Contains differentiated investigation worksheets for higher/lower attaining students. Notes are on each slide detailing additional activities and ideas for teaching. Objectives: GOOD – PRESENT and COLLECT data accurately GREAT – USE experimental data/knowledge to inform your answers OUTSTANDING – APPLY your own knowledge to solve a problem/answer a question