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I have just started adding my plays to TES (over 400)!but this will take time! All my assemblies/class plays and guided reading scripts are on www.plays-r-ussell.com and I am happy to write on request. I have converted the entire History Key Stage II curriculum into play format - and much of the other subjects such as Science, Geography, PSHE etc. I cover events such as the Olympics and have received great feedback from teachers around the world! Writing is my passion - hope you enjoy my work!

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I have just started adding my plays to TES (over 400)!but this will take time! All my assemblies/class plays and guided reading scripts are on www.plays-r-ussell.com and I am happy to write on request. I have converted the entire History Key Stage II curriculum into play format - and much of the other subjects such as Science, Geography, PSHE etc. I cover events such as the Olympics and have received great feedback from teachers around the world! Writing is my passion - hope you enjoy my work!
The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes Assembly or Class Play
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The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes Assembly or Class Play

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The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes Assembly or Class Play Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down Duration: 10 - 15 minutes reading time. This does not include music. This is a ‘two versions in one’ script, featuring the flamboyant Adam Ant as the first highwayman to appear (Adam) and Kate Bush as the first Bess (Kate) alongside the two original characters, Highwayman and Bess. (Enter 3 redcoats) Reader 7: ‘A red-coat troop came marching’ Redcoats: (Together) Marching! Marching! Reader 7: ‘King George’s men came marching, up to the old inn-door’ Kate: Oops! (Pointing to Narrator) I don’t think he saw that coming! (To Adam) Best let them continue this melancholy tale. I don’t think we want to be around at the end! (Exit Adam and Kate) Narrator: They were right! I didn’t see that coming! Nor did the landlord and his lovely daughter. Still, if they’re King George’s men, I’m sure they’ll act like gentlemen. (3 redcoats mime drinking action to landlord, who rushes off, returning with 3 large flasks of beer, which redcoats grab and down in one) Reader 8: ‘They said no word to the landlord. They drank his ale instead.’ (3 redcoats grab Bess and tie her to the bed) Reader 9: ‘But they gagged his daughter, and bound her, to the foot of her narrow bed.’ Reader 10: ‘Two of them knelt at her casement, with muskets at their side!’ Reader 11: ‘There was death at every window; And hell at one dark window;’ Reader 12: ‘For Bess could see, through her casement, the road that he would ride.’ Narrator: (Exploding) But that’s terrible! And King’s men, at that! Landlord: Oh you haven’t heard the half of it! Narrator: There’s worse? Landlord: Much worse! Other poems converted into plays by Sue Russell: • Smugglers Song – Rudyard Kipling • If – Rudyard Kipling Also available – a large collection of alternative Shakespeare and fairy tale scripts plus • Take a Book – Different Genres of Writing Assembly • Great British Writers Assembly. This short small cast assembly - 6 speakers (with adaptations for whole class) focuses on the writers *Roald Dahl, C.S. Lewis, A.A. Milne, Lewis Carroll and J.K. Rowling and their books. • Roald Dahl Assembly (Any scripts currently ‘missing’ from TES can be found on www.plays-r-ussell.com)
Evolution Assembly or Class Play
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Evolution Assembly or Class Play

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Evolution Assembly or Class Play Cast of 30 (easily adjustable) Duration: Around 20 minutes without the inclusion of music suggestions. This script has ‘serious factual content’ including a timeline from the beginning of time to the present, but it has plenty of humour including a seriously bad set of jokes at the end! This assembly or class play is based on the Evolution and Inheritance unit of study and has the following coverage: How fossils record changes that living things undergo over millions of years Shared characteristics of parents and offspring Adaptation and evolution of animals and plants in order to survive in different habitats/how characteristics are acquired rather than inherited/natural selection How creatures change over long periods of time Sample Text: (Enter Giant Tortoise slowly) Narrator: (Sarcastically) In your own time! Giant Tortoise: Hey! No need to rush! And it’s not like I have any predators to run from. Narrator: Just as well! Have you had far to come? Giant Tortoise: I live on the Galapagos islands, off the South American coast. Narrator: Whoa! That’s a long way! Giant Tortoise: Not as far as Mr Darwin travelled on his five-year trip! Narrator: So, you met the great man? (Enter Finch) Finch: We certainly did! Took some of us home with him! (Enter Darwin) Darwin: (To Giant Tortoise and Finch) You got me thinking about (To Giant Tortoise) Different patterned shells (To Finch) Different shaped beaks. You see, these creatures were different on each island suggesting they had adapted to their immediate environment. Giant Tortoise & Finch: (Together) Fascinating! (Exit Giant Tortoise & Finch) Narrator: Shall we look at some other examples? Darwin: (Enthusiastically) Certainly! Music 3 Parade of the Charioteers (Enter Stag and Peacock, both strutting proudly across stage) Stag: Look at my fine antlers! (Looks at audience) Anyone want to take me on? Peacock: Huh! No need for any violence! Just look at my magnificent display (opens tail to full effect). Who could not be impressed with me? Narrator: (Thoughtfully) Hmm. They are rather winning features Stag: It’s called ‘survival of the fittest’! Peacock: You’ve gotta have what it takes you know!
Natural Disasters Assembly or Class Play
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Natural Disasters Assembly or Class Play

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Natural Disasters Assembly or Class Play This assembly focuses on: • Volcanoes & Earthquakes • Storms – cyclones (hurricanes and typhoons) • Tsunami • Tornadoes • Fire • Flooding • Drought Given the time scale, the information on each is far from comprehensive, both in terms of description and history; but the script aims to give an overall picture – and it is for the teacher to decide whether or not to add additional material. Duration: Reading time around 15 minutes. This does not include any of the music suggestions so overall time around 20 - 25 minutes. *To extend the assembly see notes at the end (additional text taken from Pompeii Up script). Further information could be added from the Volcanoes script (also available off www.plays-r-ussell.com) Please Note: in the case of the purchase of the Volcanoes script and the Pompeii Up script there are extracts from these two already within this Natural Disasters script – i.e. there is duplication. Cast Size 30 – easily adjustable up or down Sample Text: Narrator: A tsunami? Scientist 5: Yes. That’s the Japanese for ‘harbour wave’ – this name originating from the story of village fishermen sailing out to sea but on their return finding their whole village in ruins due to a giant wave. Scientist 6: Course, if you know it’s coming you stand some kind of a chance of getting to safety – like that school girl and her family did, in the upper storey of a nearby building. Scientist 7: This ten year old had learnt in geography about the sucking sound that can be heard just before the giant wave arrives. Narrator: Well! Three cheers for all geography teachers! Education does save lives! Scientist 5: So let us tell you about earthquakes which often cause these tsunamis! Narrator: Oh very well. But briefly please! Scientist 6: What is it with this narrator and time? Anyone would think we were running out of time? (All three scientists suddenly look worried) Scientists 5, 6 & 7: (Together) Are we? Running out of time? Is there something you are not telling us? Narrator: Well, I do have to keep this assembly to within a certain time limit! Scientists 5, 6 & 7: (Sighing heavily) Oh that’s a relief! We thought it might be something serious! Narrator: (Angrily) Er, this is serious, I’ll have you know! Now please, get on with it!
World Book Day Party Assembly
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World Book Day Party Assembly

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World Book Day Party Assembly This class play or assembly is based on/uses characters from the following books: · The Horrid Henry series by Francesca Simon · Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie · The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson · Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White · Captain Underpants series by Dav Pilkey · Matilda by Roald Dahl · The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis · Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll · The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carl Cast of 30 (easily adapted up or down) This number can of course be adapted to a smaller or larger group of children – it could even be taken up to a whole year group size. This script was written following a teacher’s request and so is based on her book choices. Other books can of course be used and the number of characters increased or decreased. It is a ‘moveable feast’ – as are all the best parties! Duration: Around 20 minutes not including music suggestions Sample Text: Horrid Henry: (Scowling) Please yourself! (Exit Horrid Henry, giving exaggerated ‘yawns’) Narrator: (To Audience) Oh dear! Sorry about that! Let’s see if we can ‘raise the bar’ a little! (Peter Pan ‘flies’ onto the stage) Narrator: Ah! Peter Pan! How nice to meet you! Peter Pan: The pleasure is all mine! (Enter Wendy and Tinkerbell) Peter Pan: I’d like you to meet Wendy: (Curtseying) Wendy (looking at Peter Pan adoringly) Darling! Tinkerbell: (Trying to ‘swoosh’ Wendy out of the way) And Peter’s favourite, Tinkerbell! Peter Pan: (Laughing) Now, now Tinkerbell! We have spoken about that jealousy thing! (Tinkerbell pulls a face, sulking) Wendy: Oh but she’s so adorable! You can’t be cross with her for long! (Enter Horrid Henry) Horrid Henry: What was I saying about those yukky sugary-sweet characters? Time to introduce some more interesting ones! (Horrid Henry beckons to Captain Cook and Crocodile) (Enter Captain Cook and Crocodile, snapping at Narrator’s heels) Narrator: (Angrily) Who let this beast on here? (Glaring at Horrid Henry) Oh I might have known you’d be up to no good!
FREE Sport Relief Assembly
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FREE Sport Relief Assembly

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FREE Sport Relief Assembly Every year I do something to raise money for Sport Relief - this generally in my capacity as a zumba instructor (guess what ‘sport’ is there in the script, representing Z on the sports list?!) This script is about as versatile as I can make it - any cast size, any duration, any number of songs/music suggestions. Good luck to everyone ‘doing their thing’ this year. My challenge is going to be ‘sitting still for one minute’ during each of my 15 zumba routines - a challenge beyond anything I have ever undertaken before! If you’ve ever been to a zumba class you’ll know what I mean! Simple message to accompany this script - ENJOY! Sample Text: Child 26: Volleyball Child 27: Weightlifting Child 28: Wrestling Child 29: Zumba! Narrator: (To Child 29) I beg your pardon? Child 29: Zumba! Would you like a demonstration? Music 2 – Zumba number/Latin American music (Child 29 ‘performs’) (Loud applause from cast and audience) Narrator: Magnificent! And I can see that dancing is just as energetic as all those other sports we’ve mentioned! Child 1: (Fanning him/herself) Phew! All that hot Latin American music! Child 2: But let’s not forget our winter sports! Child 3: We have only just had those fantastic Winter Olympics! Child 4: Who could forget Child 5: The skiing Child 6: Bobsleigh Child 7: Figure skating Child 8: Ice hockey Next big sporting event – THE WORLD CUP! Check out assemblies, guided reading scripts and quiz on this wonderful theme! All available off TES and
Skeleton and Muscles Assembly or Class Play
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Skeleton and Muscles Assembly or Class Play

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Skeleton and Muscles Assembly or Class Play Suitable for Key Stage II (Years 3 & 4) As our Narrator finds out, ‘Head Shoulders Knees and Toes’, however beautifully sung, is never going to ‘do it’ - not with an X-Ray Technician, Doctor and Physiotherapist around! And as for Halloween skeletons? Nah! Not if the bones are on the outside! Cast of 30 - easily adapted up or down. Duration - around 15 to 20 minutes. Sample Text: (Enter X-Ray Technician who takes one look at the ‘skeletons’ and falls about laughing) Skeleton 1: Hey! What’s so funny? X-Ray Technician: Well, to be honest (pauses) you! Skeleton 2: Hey! There’s nothing wrong with us! Skeleton 3: You’re not laughing at our costumes, are you? X-Ray Technician: Well, I’m guessing they’re from last year’s Halloween? Skeletons 1, 2 & 3: (Together, angrily) So? X-Ray Technician: So, you can’t expect to be taken seriously! Skeleton 1: And why not? X-Ray Technician: Well, has anybody ever told you, human beings have endoskeletons? Skeletons 1, 2 & 3: (Together) Endoskeletons? X-Ray Technician: Yes, that means skeletons inside the body! That’s what makes my job so important! Skeleton 2: And that job is? X-Ray Technician: (Holding up an x-ray) I’m an X-Ray Technician. I can see inside your body! (Skeletons all gasp and cross their hands in front of their bodies) X-Ray Technician: (Laughing) No! Not with my naked eyes. But I can see every bone there is to see, with my special x-ray machinery! Narrator: Aha! Some educational content! At last! I was beginning to worry! X-Ray Technician: Oh no need to worry! With a little bit of help from your class, we’ll have everyone talking bones in no time! Narrator: Well, that would be useful, I suppose. Our school science equipment certainly doesn’t run to x-ray machines! X-Ray Technician: Of course not! And way too dangerous to have within a school building! Narrator: But we do teach the children about their bodies. To a very high level in fact. (Narrator gestures for Child 1, 2 & 3 to step forward) So, children. What have you learnt so far? (Child 1, 2 and 3 launch into a lively version of ‘Head Shoulders Knees and Toes’; Narrator looks on smiling, whilst X-Ray Technician holds his head in bemusement) (Narrator, seeing the ever increasing look of bemusement on X-Ray Technician’s face, stops the singing) Narrator: (To X-Ray Technician) What is the matter? Also available www.plays-r-ussell.com : • Teeth and Eating Assembly/Class Play – based on Unit 3A. Plus • Assembly/Class Play for Year 5s and 6s on What Makes a Healthy Body
Spanish Assembly or Class Play
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Spanish Assembly or Class Play

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Spanish Class Play or Assembly Cast of 30, duration 10-15 mins. This class play on Spain is one of a set Sue Russell has written on different countries (Great Britain, England, Scotland, Wales, Holland, Australia, France, Spain, Malta, India, Africa) It celebrates all things Spanish and is a tribute to the country - its people and culture, as celebrated in Hispanic Heritage Month Sept – October, starring a rather 'full of himself' Christopher Columbus and some seriously crazy Pamplona bull runners! Written for 7 – 11 year olds. Another script is available for the lower age range of 5 – 7. This latter is another class play on Great Explorers, key starring roles going to Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong. Available off TES and www.plays-r-ussell.com (I have just updated this script - to include more uptodate information e.g. on arrival of Zinedine Zidane as Real Madrid's coach!) (Child 17 brings on supper of cheese, served on bread) Child 17: Supper! Cena. This is the last meal of the day and is a light meal. I think you’ll enjoy this sheep’s cheese and bread. (Narrator eats, then Child 17 clears away) Narrator: Well! That was certainly the fastest three meals I’ve ever had in my life! (Enter Child 18 with bunch of grapes) Child 18: Good practice for New Year’s Eve – when you need to eat 12 grapes in 12 seconds! Narrator: And why would I want to do that? Child 18: If you want good luck for the next year. Narrator: What a strange custom! Child 18: But it’s a country’s special traditions that keep it alive! (Enter Child 19 – 23 in national costume, plus sheep: Child 24 & 25) Narrator: (Gasping) Wow! Just look at these national costumes! Child 19: In Valencia we wear long silk dresses and shawls worn over our shoulders Child 20: And short dark jackets and large-brimmed black hats for us men! Music 3 – Flamenco music (Child 21 flamencos across the stage) Child 21: How do you like my dress? Andalucian style? Narrator: Ah! Beautiful! Music 4 – Bagpipes music (Everyone covers their ears; Narrator walks over and signals to Bagpipe player, Child 22, to stop) Child 22: The finest music from Galicia! Narrator: If you say so! (Sound of loud bleating from the sheep) Narrator: (To Shepherd, Child 23) And you sir? Child 23: A shepherd, from the Basque country, looking after his sheep. (Sheep start ‘jostling/nudging’ Flamenco dancer who does her best to fend off their attentions) Narrator: (To Shepherd) Er, maybe time to herd them up?
Feeling Sad Assembly or Class Play
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Feeling Sad Assembly or Class Play

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Feeling Sad Assembly or Class Play This script was largely ‘prompted by’ Time to Talk Day Thursday February 4th - a joint initiative run by MIND and Rethink - addressing the taboo around mental health - people still tend to feel uncomfortable talking about it. Its Children’s Mental Health Week 3 - 9 February. So I am reducing a number of my ‘mental health related’ scripts to mark the occasion As this was written for primary schools, the language is of course simple as is the message - emphasizing that sadness is part of life, something we should all talk about and not feel embarrassed about. I have followed this script up with one for secondary schools/adults - Good to Talk - a conversation between two people. (In 2 Speaker Scripts section of website) Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down Duration - around 5 - 10 minutes Sample Text: Music 1 Everybody Hurts - REM (Children file into assembly, taking seats in order of speaking, along two rows of 15 seats, facing audience) Narrator: Good morning and welcome to our assembly on Feeling Sad. (Enter Clown) Clown: Hey! What’s up, people? (Nobody smiling) Hey! Time to turn those frowns, upside down! Narrator: Actually, I’m going to ask you to take your seat again. (Narrator leads Clown back to seat) Narrator: Fooling around, making people laugh – there’s a time and place for that. But not now. (Clown jumps up again) Clown: But these are children! They need to be laughing and smiling! (Narrator patiently leads Clown back to seat again) Narrator: No, they don’t. You see, being happy and jolly is fine. But so too is being sad. (Clown jumps up) Clown: But nobody wants to be sad! (Spluttering) That’s …. That’s just wrong! (Loud sigh from Child 1) Child 1: Oh do please sit down and perhaps we can explain. (Clown reluctantly returns to seat) Child 1: We are all sad from time to time. Child 2: It’s part of life. Child 3: It’s part of the human condition. Child 4: And you know what? It’s actually OK to feel sad. Child 5: Sometimes, however, we feel we have to hide our emotions. Child 6: Pretend we’re OK – when we’re not. Child 7: It’s much better if you’re feeling sad to share it with someone.
Maya Assembly or Class Play
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Maya Assembly or Class Play

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Maya Assembly or Class Play Cast of 30 (easily adjusted up or down) Duration: Around 20 minutes Self-important kings, moody gods, ...not to mention that chocoholic! Our narrator finds his/her work cut out as usual, keeping things moving along smoothly - within the normal time confines but this time working to a Maya calendar - just enough time to cover those 20 days - in words and numbers, Maya style of course! Set of Guided Reading scripts also available – 5 scripts, 6 speakers each. Part of large Ancient Civilizations collection written by Sue Russell available off TES and www.plays-r-ussell.com Sample Text: Lord Pacal: I am the great Lord Pacal! I ruled for 68 years, from A.D. 615 to 684. (Enter Child 8 holding up Classic Period banner) Child 8: This was at the beginning of the Classic Period – A.D. 600 to 900. Narrator: The Classic Period, you say? What was so classic about it? Child 8: This was when the Maya were at their most successful – their peak time, if you like. Narrator: So let’s hear about their achievements during that time. (Exit Child 8) Lord Pacal: How about we start with … me? Narrator: (Aside, sarcastically) Why didn’t I hear that coming? Lord Pacal: (Holding up pictures) Now. If you look very carefully you can see me, linking the realm of my ancestors to that of the gods. Narrator: Ah! I’ve heard about that sacred kingship! Lord Pacal: But that’s not all! Narrator: (Aside) I didn’t think it would be! Lord Pacal: I was also the guarantor of fertility, rain and crops – here, see on these pictures! And that’s not all! Narrator: (Sarcastically) Really? Now there’s a surprise! Lord Pacal: I was also a magnificent warrior! Narrator: (Sarcastically) Really? Lord Pacal: Oh, I know. Who’d have thought it! All this in just one life time! Narrator: Amazing! Lord Pacal: Course, I had to make sure people didn’t forget me. Narrator: As if!
Changes in Britain from Stone Age to Iron Age Assembly or Class Play
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Changes in Britain from Stone Age to Iron Age Assembly or Class Play

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Changes in Britain from Stone Age to Iron Age Assembly or Class Play IMPORTANT - PLEASE READ THIS BEFORE PURCHASE OF SCRIPT! This script was written for LOWER KEY STAGE II YEARS 3 & 4.If you want a script for Years 5 & 6 you need to buy the other script entitled Stone Age to Iron Age Assembly. This second script written by Sue Russell is a much shorter script - half the length of the previously released Stone Age to Iron Age Class Play and the reading parts are smaller. To judge which would best suit your class, take a look at both sample scripts on the website. Also available to purchase: Set of guided reading scripts. Complete collection of scripts available off www.plays-r-ussell.com Cast of 30 (easily adaptable up or down) Duration: Around 10 minutes not including music suggestions. Sample Text: Child 8: This was a huge change! (Child with Change banner waves it briefly on stage) Child 8: It meant no more chasing animals. Farmer 1: Cereal crops are much better behaved! They don’t run away! Child 8: So people could settle and live in villages. Farmer 2: But we had to get better at producing more food, like the Ancient Egyptians! Farmer 1: In Ancient Egypt they used irrigation Farmer 2: Those Ancient Egyptians were pretty advanced for their time! (Enter Villagers from Skara Brae) Villager 1: Actually, we built our settlement at Skara Brae in Scotland before the Egyptian pyramids were built! Villager 2: Our houses had stone walls and roofs made from turf and whalebone! Villager 1: We had furniture Villager 2: And even flushing toilets! Narrator: (Astonished) Flushing toilets? Villager 2: Well, flushed by streams, that is! (Exit Villagers 1 and 2) Narrator: Flushing toilets, indeed! Now that’s progress!
Battle of Hastings Assembly or Class Play
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Battle of Hastings Assembly or Class Play

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Battle of Hastings Assembly or Class Play This script was written by Sue Russell in celebration of The Battle of Hastings' 950th anniversary. What have the most famous cartoon strip in history, a masterpiece of needlework, a distinctly odd bishop, some dodgy family connections, warring Anglo Saxons and Normans, and an arrow in the eye have in common? Correct! They're all part of that famous drama - you know the one, 1066 and all that?! Cast of 30 - easily adapted up or down Duration around 10 - 15 minutes (not including music) Sample Text: Embroiderer 2: Hours and hours of needle in, needle out! Embroiderer 3: (Sarcastically) Wow! Life can’t, surely, get much more exciting than this! Bishop of Bayeux: O dear, dear, dear, dear! I can see something drastic needs to happen round here! How are we going to get you excited about your work? (Enter Edward) Edward: Easy! Let’s just introduce them to some of the characters they are working on! Let them see what we were actually like in the flesh! Bishop of Bayeux: Ah! A splendid idea! And you are? Edward: King Edward the III of England or Edward the Confessor! I’m (Edward walks along work of six Embroiderers, peering down, trying to see himself; he stops abruptly at Embroiderer 4) Edward: Ah yes! Here I am! Dying! Bishop of Bayeux: (Sarcastically) Oh wonderful! Well, that really livens things up for us! Thank you so much! Edward: Oh dear! I didn’t mean to put a dampener on things! (Edward goes back to the line of Embroiderers and this time stops at Embroiderer 1) Edward: Ah now, that’s better! That’s when I’m still king! Alive and kicking! (Edward falls about laughing at his own joke) (Whole cast groans) Bishop of Bayeux: (Aside) Oh dear! I think I preferred him dead!
Superheroes Assembly for Key Stage I
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Superheroes Assembly for Key Stage I

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Superheroes Assembly for Key Stage I Duration: Around 10 – 15 minutes depending on how many ‘superhero demonstrations’ there are. The first ‘speaking’ part of the assembly is around 5 minutes reading time. The rest of the assembly is down to the teacher in charge as explained in Production Notes. Cast: Written for cast of 30 but easily adaptable up or down. The cast comprises class teacher as narrator plus children 1 – 30. This assembly or class play is in roughly two parts - the first deals with the qualities of a superhero and how a superhero would change the world; the second is a demonstration of 'superpowers' by different 'superheroes'. It is very much a 'movable feast' - the children can make their own choices re: how they'd change the world; and likewise choose which superheroes they'd like to portray - they can even make up their own. I have thus provided a 'template' which can be adapted according to class numbers and 'members'. Sample Text: Narrator: Good morning and welcome to our assembly on Whole cast: (Together) Superheroes! Narrator: So, for the benefit of our audience, what makes a superhero? Or maybe I should ask the question, what makes a hero super? Child 1: Super powers, of course! Child 2: You can’t do much without them! Child 3: Especially against those horrible baddies! Narrator: So. Let me get this straight. Heroes are always good? Child 4: Right. They fight for what is good in the world Child 5: Against all that is bad! Narrator: That must take a lot of courage! Child 6: That’s why they’re superheroes! Child 7: Brave! Child 8: Strong! Child 9: And determined! Child 10: It’s not always easy being a superhero! Narrator: (To cast) So. If you had the powers of a superhero, what would you do to make the world a better place? Child 11: I would take food to everyone who was hungry. Child 12: I would give shelter to everyone without a home. Child 13: I would hug everyone who feels unloved. Child 14: I would drive around in a Ferrari! Narrator: (Snorting) Oh really! And how is that going to improve the world? Child 14: Well, it would certainly improve mine!
Aztec Assembly
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Aztec Assembly

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Aztec Assembly This assembly has everything from 'chillin' Mexicans to Aztec rulers with a flair for zumba! Course, there is that small issue of human sacrifices .... but then compared to dying by tarantula, snake or ..medicine? Maybe those captives were the lucky ones! To sum up - a whole lotta history with a large dose of Hey Macarena! Cast of 30 - easily adapted up or down. Duration - around 20 minutes. Sample Text: Narrator: Good morning and welcome to our assembly on Whole cast: (Shouting together) The Aztecs! Narrator: Let’s start with a few facts about Mexico! Child 1: How do you make a Mexican chilli? Narrator: So, how do you make a Mexican chilli? Child 1: Take him to the North Pole! Narrator: (Groaning) Oh dear! I do hope that’s not going to set the tone of this assembly. (To Child 2) I hope you’ve got something a little more serious to offer? Child 2: Oh yes! But could I just suggest we get a move on? Narrator: Oh? Why the hurry? Child 2: Because we might not have long to live! (Everyone gasps) Child 1: (Pointing to Child 2) Oh don’t listen to him! He’s been talking to the Aztecs! Narrator: Well, I’m very glad to hear it! That is what this assembly’s meant to be about! Child 2: Thank you. But we still need to get a move on. (Dramatic pause) Before the world ends! Narrator: Oh dear! You really know how to get a party going! We’ve barely started and you’re talking about the end! Other Ancient Civilisation scripts written by Sue Russell (available off www.plays-r-ussell.com until added to TES website): Assemblies: Ancient Greece (2 assemblies, Units 14 & 15) Ancient Egypt Ancient China Ancient Rome Ancient Sumer Indus Valley Baghdad: Early Islamic Civilisation Maya civilisation Benin civilisation & Aztecs Majority of these have supplementary guided reading scripts Also available, if you need ‘the Big Picture’: Ancient Civilisations Assembly – a collective assembly, covering 6 ancient civilisations, answering questions When? and Where? Ancient Civilisations History of Medicine Assembly
Volcanoes Assembly or Class Play
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Volcanoes Assembly or Class Play

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Volcano Assembly or Class Play This class play can best be described as ... explosive! It is highly recommended that you purchase a pair of ear plugs before agreeing to sit through this performance! Even the Roman god of fire cannot control these forces of nature. ... though no one is about to try and control him! This script covers the questions what, how, where and a few examples of when - though ‘Pompeii up’ provides a far more comprehensive historical account of what happened in those two Roman cities destroyed by Mount Vesuvius (available off www.plays-r-ussell.com) Duration - around 10 minutes reading time but this does not include music (or explosions!) Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down. Sample Text: Music 1 Mars – The Planets – Gustav Holst (Children file in, seating themselves in speaking order, along two rows of fifteen seats facing the audience) Narrator: Good morning and welcome to our assembly on Music 2 Fire – Arthur Brown (See Production Notes) (Vulcan strides onto stage) Vulcan: (Pounding his chest) Me! The mighty Roman god of fire, Vulcan! Narrator: (Irritably) But its volcanoes we’re doing today! Not Roman gods! Vulcan: (Sighing) So, where do you think the word volcano comes from? Narrator: (Sarcastically) Oh, now. Don’t tell me. (Pauses) Oh, that wouldn’t be you would it? Vulcan: It most certainly would! Nothing to do with that Mars you were just playing. Narrator: No! No! That’s the planet Mars – from The Planets by Gustav Holst! Vulcan: But I thought you said this assembly was on volcanoes? Narrator: Correct! But we thought that music was just right to set the tone – of high drama! Vulcan: Oh! Is that what we’re getting this morning? Narrator: I hope so! There’s nothing dull about volcanoes! (Sound of loud snores from ‘Sleeping Giants’) Vulcan: Er, it would seem not everyone agrees with you! (Exit Vulcan) (Sleeping Giants all raise their heads, wipe their eyes, blinking at the audience) Narrator: Oh no! We haven’t woken you, have we? Sleeping Giant 1: Nah! Don’t worry! Sleeping Giant 2: We’re dormant volcanoes! Sleeping Giant 3: Little chance we’ll erupt! Sleeping Giant 4: (Yawning) In fact, if you don’t mind, we’ll just go back to sleep again! Narrator: No, no! Not at all! Please be my guest! (Sleeping Giants put heads down and resume sleep)
Frog Life Cycle Assembly
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Frog Life Cycle Assembly

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Frog Life Cycle Assembly This class play was written for KS I (5 – 7 year olds) as Life Cycles are taught earlier in school - but if anyone wants a script for older children (7 – 11 year olds with a lot more technical information) please let me know. Always happy to write on request. Written for cast of 30, but easily adaptable up or down, there are 14 frogs, 12 tadpoles, a fish, a water beetle, a French chef .... and of course, a princess! Duration around 10 minutes. Learn all about the frog's life cycle in this fun class performance. Also available off TES and www.plays-r-ussell.com: Life Cycle of a Butterfly plus numerous butterfly scripts (guided reading scripts/Readers Theater) delivering life lessons. Sample Text: Frog 11: And look at our jumping! (Frogs demonstrate jumping across ‘stage’) Narrator: (Applauding) Fabulous! Frog 12: We do have very strong back legs (Enter French chef, sharpening knives in front of him, advancing towards frogs) French chef: Ah! Zee finest frogs’ legs! Yum yum! My customers will be pleased! (Narrator rushes over and shows French chef back to his seat) Narrator: No! No! We’ll have no violence here today! (Exit French chef) (Frogs let out collective sigh of relief) Frog 13: Phew! Thank you for that! (Enter princess, wondering around, ‘looking for someone’) Narrator: Ah! A princess! Now what would she be doing in an assembly full of frogs?
Castles and Knights Assembly
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Castles and Knights Assembly

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Castles and Knights Assembly Key Stage I and/or II - Simple language but broad scope of information - script easily adapted to any age group. Although written for Key Stage I children (language kept very simple) this class play or assembly could be used at Key Stage II due to the broad scope of information. Cast of 30 - easily adjustable up or down Duration - around 10 - 15 minutes Content · The first part of the assembly deals with division between nobility and servants – their different life styles and jobs they did. · The second part looks at castle features – how they were built and how they changed over time. · The third part looks at weapons of battle – how they were used to attack and defend a castle. As previously mentioned, this assembly could be used by either of the two key stages – either simplified for younger children or elaborated upon for the older students. It is, I hope, a fairly versatile script which can be adapted for any age group. Also available off www.plays-r-ussell.com is The Battle of Hastings 1066. This assembly is for Key Stage II and goes into a lot more historical background including the events depicted and characters displayed on the Bayeux Tapestry. Sample Text (Enter Minstrel, Jester and Juggler) Minstrel: Who do you think played music at those banquets? Jester: Who do you think kept them laughing? Juggler: And who do you think entertained them? (Enter Soldiers 1 & 2) Soldier 1: And most important of all, who do you think kept them safe? Us soldiers, of course! Soldier 2: Protecting everyone against the enemy! Gong Farmer: Well. Almost most important of all! Narrator: Oh really? You think you’re more important than them? (Gong Farmer nods) Soldier 1: How? Gong Farmer: You really want to know? Soldier 2: Indeed, we do! Gong Farmer: I had to get rid of … Soldier 1: (Holding nose) Oh, now I get it! Soldier 2: You got rid of what came out of the garderobes? Narrator: The what? Soldier 2: Garderobes! Soldier 1: That’s castle toilets to you! Narrator: Ugh! Poor man! What a job! Gong Farmer: Well, someone had to do it! Narrator: Oh dear! I can see life wasn’t quite so glamourous for you folk! (All shake their heads in agreement) (Exit Gong Farmer, Servant, Cook, Hunter, Cleaner, Builder, Carpenter, Blacksmith, Priest, Steward, Minstrel, Jester, Juggler and Soldiers 1 & 2)
Colours Assembly or Class Play for Key Stage I
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Colours Assembly or Class Play for Key Stage I

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Colour Assembly for Key Stage One (5 – 7-year olds) Cast of 30 (easily adapted up or down). Duration 5 – 10 minutes. This assembly or class play is intended as a brief introduction to colour. As well as listing the primary and secondary colours it looks at feelings and images associated with colour, plus a touch of stereotyping (blues and pinks) – thankfully blown away by Elmer appearance! Sample Text: Narrator: (Applauding whole cast) Very good! (Pauses) And isn’t it funny how sometimes colours can make us experience different feelings. (To Child 17) You said how red made you feel hot. I wonder if we can do the same exercise again but think of how the colour makes us feel. Let’s start with red again! Child 1: Angry! Child 2: I see red! Grrrr! Narrator: Orange! Child 3: it’s a nice bright colour so it makes me happy! Narrator: Yellow! Child 4: (Running on the spot) Lots of energy! Narrator: (Thoughtfully) Hmm. That’s a positive spin on the word. But have you heard the expression ‘cowardly custard’? Sometimes yellow can be used in quite a mean way. Child 5: I think of buttercups! (Takes one out of pocket and holds it under chin) Can you see if I like butter or not? (Narrator walks over to have a look) Narrator: It seems you do! A definite yellow glow on your chin! (Pauses) Now, where were we? Ah yes, green! Child 6: You can feel green with envy! Narrator: Indeed you can! (Pauses) And blue? Child 7: Brrrr! It’s suddenly feeling a bit cold around here!
Weather around the World Assembly or Class Play
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Weather around the World Assembly or Class Play

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Weather around the World Assembly or Class Play This script is suitable for any year group in Key Stage II i.e. years 3, 4, 5 and 6. The text and concepts are generally simple with examples of Polar, Tropical and Temperate climate zones. Duration Around 15 minutes not including any of the music suggestions. Cast of 30 – easily adapted up or down This class play 'defines' weather (and climate) and gives some examples from around the world (the focus being on the United Kingdom); plus an attempt at explaining why we are all so obsessed with the subject - could it have anything to do with our expectations of English 'summers'?! Latest addition to Sue Russell’s Geography scripts: A Class Play On Natural Disasters – available here and on www.plays-r-ussell.com (complete collection) Music 1 Weather with You – Crowded House (Class files in, taking seats along two rows of 15 seats, facing the audience) (Narrator stands, takes jacket off and steps forward to address audience) Narrator: Good morning and welcome to our assembly on Music 2 Sound of Thunder, Lightning and Rain – musical instruments (Narrator holds his hands over his head to ward off deluge of rain; then rushes back to his chair and grabs an umbrella, scowling heavily) (Enter ‘Gene Kelly’, singing and dancing) Music 3 Singin in the Rain – Gene Kelly (Narrator holds up hand for music to stop) Narrator: Hey! Wait a minute! What are you looking so cheerful about? Can’t you see it’s raining? Gene Kelly: Well, that’s no reason to be miserable. What did you expect? We are in England, you know? (Exit Gene Kelly) Narrator: (Irritably) Yes, and it also happens to be summer! (Enter Weather forecaster, looking around) Weather Forecaster: Er, um. You wouldn’t happen to be doing a school assembly on The Weather, would you? Narrator: (Angrily) I most certainly would! Oh, don’t tell me you’re the weather man we were expecting? Weather Forecaster: Weather Forecaster, that’s correct. I’m most dreadfully sorry I’m late. I see you’ve started without me! Narrator: As has the weather! I thought you said it was going to be sunny today? Weather Forecaster: Ah! Well that does depend what part of the country you are in; and of course what time of the day it is. Things change all the time in the world of weather! Narrator: Including your predictions! Weather Forecaster: Well, it is very difficult to get it right all the time! Narrator: (Testily) You can say that again! I mean, what am I supposed to wear? Weather Forecaster: Well. For this time of year, I’d suggest light clothing, plus a woolly jumper, plus a raincoat!
Home Sch Literacy Timetable Free script
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Home Sch Literacy Timetable Free script

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Home School Literacy Timetable for 12 week period Doing all this in bit of a rush, to get home school resources out there as quickly as possible. I already have well over a hundred scripts available off TES and my website www.plays-r-ussell.com which can be read by 2 speakers or 6 (with a few around 10) all of which can be adapted/speakers doubled up for whatever number is required. (Ones on my website have all been reduced in price and I will do same for TES when I get a minute!) I have produced three 12 week timetables – one for History/Social Studies, one for Literacy and one for the other subjects of the curriculum, using these resources – and as they are just timetables, I have added onto the end of each a FREE script (in the case of the History timetable) and a FREE story plus 2 speaker script in the case of the Literacy and ‘Other Subjects of the Curriculum’ timetable, just as tasters/gifts! This is going to be a difficult time but hopefully the knowledge that there are plenty of home school resources available out there, will help. Enjoy! I will also be producing FREE resources so keep checking out TpT and www.plays-r-ussell.com ! Sample Texts of Free Story and Script I. How the Butterfly Lost his Bad Temper II. How the Butterfly Lost her Dissatisfaction III. How the Butterfly Lost his Vanity IV. How the Butterfly Learned to Fly V. How the Butterfly Learned to Fly Higher Based on Life Lessons: Appreciate what you have Stop ‘wanting’/looking for more Recognising that external beauty is not everything Just do it! The importance of striving/realising your potential Each story is followed by the guided reading script, then the discussion/question and answer session. The stories and guided reading scripts are 5 – 10 minutes in length. Total reading time: around an hour The 5 guided reading scripts have 2 speakers each – total of 10 altogether.
Fear Factor script/discussion FREE
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Fear Factor script/discussion FREE

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The Fear Factor including discussion and Chicken Licken script As I think the all prevailing feeling at the moment is one of fear and apprehension, I would like to offer the following script on handling fear FREE – in the hope that it will be instrumental in distilling some of that fear we are dealing with or at least give us strategies to cope with it. The script/discussion piece (which can be read between 2 readers or 30 as the speakers are non-specific) looks at what fear is, what causes it and how we can best deal with different types of fear. There is a mini script – on Chicken Licken to add a bit of light relief – but the extended script is a discussion covering all the points just mentioned. There is no mention of Coronovirus although some of the fear mentioned is related to this fear of the unknown – but I decided there is plenty enough information out there at the moment, not to go into it all over again. One of the points I make is that fear is lessened by having the correct information and this is probably the closest I get to referring to our current situation. It is there, implicit in the script – but as it is written for all ages including primary school children, the subject of Coronovirus is, I feel, best dealt with on a face to face, discretionary basis. I do not wish to add to the current atmosphere of fear – that would be doing the opposite of what I wish to achieve with this script. Duration: Around 20 minutes (including ‘discussion script’) Cast: Chicken Licken script (10 mins) has cast of 10; but discussion could be just between 2 readers or 30 depending on how it is used – at home or in the classroom. I am also working on a HOME SCHOOLING package on my website www.plays-r-ussell.com – which I will make available to TES once I have got it sorted. I have a large collection of ‘readers theatre’ or guided reading scripts for small numbers of readers, which cover pretty much all subjects – History, Geography, Literature – and may help during this difficult period. I will be reducing all these products’ prices by 50% (unless, like me you are now down to zero salary – in which case please contact me via my website and I will see what I can do). Sample Text: Speaker 11: I will! It’s good to know there is something I can do about my anxiety and fear. Narrator: I think you just hit the nail on the head! Fear is so often generated by fear of not being able to do anything about it – that whatever we are afraid of is out of our control. Speaker 12: It’s almost fear of fear! Narrator: Yes, it can escalate fast. Fear does seem to feed on fear – a bit like in that Chicken Licken story, when one small comment got everyone all wound up and fearful Speaker 13: And nobody stopped to ask for a proper explanation. It was a bit like a ‘panic train’ – everyone jumping on board!