Brazil Host Country to 2016 Olympics Assembly

Brazil Host Country to 2016 Olympics Assembly

Brazil Host Country to 2016 Olympics Assembly This class play looks at the country in which the Olympics is staged this year (plus information on the Olympics e.g. Olympic Torch journey, number of countries taking part etc) For a history of the Olympics and coverage of sporting events, please select from one of the other scripts listed below (scroll down below sample Text) Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down Duration - around 10 minutes not including music suggestions Sample Text: Child 11: But haven’t you heard what party there’s going to be Child 12: Starting August 5th Child 13: And going on til August 21st? Narrator: (Spluttering) But, but, that’s … over 2 weeks! What kind of party goes on that long? (Cast swaps Carnival banners for Olympics banners, raising them above their heads) Whole cast: (Shouting) The Olympics! Music 2 Fanfare for the Common Man Narrator: Oh my goodness! The Olympics again! It seems like only yesterday we were partying in London! Child 14: That was for the 2012 Olympics! Proud hosts – the United Kingdom! Child 15: But 2016 is the year for Brazil – proud hosts of the 31st Olympic Games! Child 16: In the city of Rio de Janeiro! Music 3 Gypsy King ‘Carnival selection’ (Whole cast grab their carnival props and raise them again) Narrator: Wow! Summer 2016 is going to be some party! How can it not be – with the Olympics in Brazil? (Narrator turns to Child 15) Narrator: But what was that you said about the number of Olympic Games we’ve had so far? Child 15: 30 so far. 2016 will be the 31st! Child 16: The very first one was of course held in Ancient Greece. Child 17: In the city of Olympia – birthplace of the Olympic Games! Child 18: And that’s where the Olympic Torch started its journey on 21 April 2016 Other scripts available from Sue Russell: ASSEMBLIES 1. Olympics PRIDE Assembly (PSHE 'team spirit' script) 2. Olympic Games 2016 Leavers Assembly 3. Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly - covering all 28 sports 4. History of the Olympics Assembly 5. Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly: history and events - combined script including Olympic Ode 6. Olympics Assembly for Key Stage 1 Rio 2016 7. Paralympics 2016 Assembly GUIDED READING SCRIPTS 1. A Complete History of the Olympic Games Guided Reading Scripts plus quizzes - set of 8 scripts, plus quizzes 2. Olympics PRIDE Guided Reading QUIZ Rio 2016 Olympic Games Quiz - 100 questions and answers! plus OLYMPIC ODE
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Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly including history events and ode

Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly including history events and ode

Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly including history events and ode This class play is a combination/condensed version of two previous scripts: History of the Olympic Games and Olympic Games 2016. Whilst its main focus is coverage of all the 2016 sporting events, there is included a list of the previous 'host nations' (but without all the accompanying information i.e. medals won and 'events' on and off the course - inclusion of all this material would have made a single script far too long). Also included is the Olympic Ode - as an optional extra. Thus, the cast can be as small as 30 or as great as 75, with a cast of 52 as another possibility - the production notes explaining these numbers fully. The duration is from 20 minutes to at least 30 minutes - this does not include music options. Sample Text Child 5: Like football! Same objective but using feet instead of a stick! Oh and not forgetting that new sport – rugby sevens. New Zealand have to be the favourites having won the 2015 rugby World Cup. Course we all know how good the Brazilians are at football – oops, don’t mention the last world cup! Narrator: But playing at home should give them ‘the edge’ Trev: Like in 1908 when Great Britain won gold! What a moment! Particularly as this was the first time football had been played at the Olympics! A debut to remember! Narrator: (Aside) Those were the days! But hey! (Shaking himself up) Who knows? Amazing things do happen at the Olympics! Child 6: Like that 1992 U.S. Dream Team! What a set of athletes they were – and not bad at ‘dunkin’ from what I’ve heard! Narrator: Dunkin? You mean, Dunkin Doughnuts? (Rubbing tummy) Mmm I’ve heard they’re pretty yummy! Child 6: (Throwing hands up in exasperation) No no! Not that kind of ‘dunkin’! Basketball dunkin is when the ball is slammed directly into the net using one or two hands. Other scripts available from Sue Russell: ASSEMBLIES 1. Brazil Host Country to the Olympics 2016 Assembly 2. Olympics PRIDE Assembly (PSHE 'team spirit' script) 3. Olympic Games 2016 Leavers Assembly 4. Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly - covering all 28 sports 5. History of the Olympics Assembly 6. Olympics Assembly for Key Stage 1 Rio 2016 7. Paralympics 2016 Assembly GUIDED READING SCRIPTS 1. A Complete History of the Olympic Games Guided Reading Scripts plus quizzes - set of 8 scripts, plus quizzes 2. Olympics PRIDE Guided Reading QUIZ Rio 2016 Olympic Games Quiz - 100 questions and answers! plus OLYMPIC ODE
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Leavers' Assembly for Year 6s

Leavers' Assembly for Year 6s

Leavers' Assembly for Year 6s This end of year assembly, for Year 6s, is a light-hearted romp through what they have learnt - with reference to The Big Three (Core Subjects) and not forgetting the Nine Foundation Subjects! The focus is on history (Romans through to the present day) but there are plenty of cross-curricular links along with 'mandatory' reference to Literacy and Numeracy Strategies (which ones?!) and other equally 'important' matters - such as what the dinner ladies are serving up! Cast: Written for a year group of around 90, 3 classes - speaking parts for all, but easily adaptable to smaller year group or fewer classes. Duration: The reading time is relatively short (around 10/15 minutes) so favourite poems or extracts from favourite stories could be added - for children to read or recite. Likewise with favourite Art and D.T. projects (evidence for which may still be at home!). Sample Text Shakespeare: What ho? Methinks this principal should learn a few principle facts himself! Like (embracing himself) "Some are born great, some achieve greatness" .... (pauses, pointing towards Principal) but alas "Some have greatness thrust upon them"! Principal: (Striding towards Shakespeare) Now look here, Bill! I'm the one running this show, today. You and your plays can go ... Music 5 Food Glorious Food - Oliver (Loud outburst of "Food Glorious Food" sung by Oliver and boys. Shakespeare and Drake exit, holding their ears) Principal: And who might this scruffy looking lot be? They wouldn't get into my school looking like that! Oliver: (With bowl held out to Principal) More! Please sir, can I have some more? Principal: (Yelling) More?! (Principal looks inside bowl, sniffs and pulls back in disgust) Principal: Ugh! I don't remember this being on the cafeteria menu this morning? (Line of dinner ladies file on, each holding a different dish, and offering food to Oliver, who samples each in turn) Production Directions This assembly was written for a year group consisting of 3 classes (around 30 for each). Thus, there are 3 groups: Like, Dislike and Not Sure (reflecting feelings about school); these then change into the 3 core subjects; and finally the 9 foundation subjects are added. This arrangement can be changed - dividing one class into three or two classes into three. Because of the primary focus being on history, this subject has the greatest number of speakers (52) - the other subjects just having a handful. Other Leavers Assemblies by Sue Russell: • Our School's Got Talent Leavers' Assembly • Olympics Leavers Assembly • School's Out Leavers' Assembly • It’s Good to be Me Leavers Assembly
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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Play

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Play

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Play This re-telling of the original story stays true to the plot - with just a small twist at the end. Oh, and anyone wishing to play the original 'delightfully wholesome' Dorothy may be in for a bit of a shock! There is also a Christmas version of this class play or assembly - with, as you would expect, a few Xmas additions! This is available as a separate purchase. Cast of 30 (with some doubling up) Duration: Around 30 minutes not including the music suggestions. Also available: · The Wizard of Oz Guided Reading Scripts (10 of these, with 6 speakers each; around 3 minutes each – total reading time around 30 minutes Sample Text: Wicked Witch: Now. Where have that little gang of misfits got to? I don’t suppose anyone would miss them! Narrator: Whatever do you mean, ma’am? ‘Miss them’? Wicked Witch: Oh, haven’t you heard? I’m about to wipe them off the face of Oz! Good riddance I say! Narrator: (Gasping) You what? But you can’t! Wicked Witch: Oh really? Just watch me! (Enter Dorothy, Toto, Scarecrow, Tin Woodman and Cowardly Lion) Wicked Witch: Ah here they all are! Right on cue! Like lambs to the slaughter! (Sound of wolves howling) Wicked Witch: Bring on the wolves! (Enter wolves – who are then all ‘knocked out’ by Tin Woodman) (Whole cast cheers, as Tin Woodman waves his axe triumphantly) (Exit wolves, rubbing their heads) Wicked Witch: (To Tin Woodman) Hey! That’s no way to treat my pets! I’ll report you to the RSPCA! (Sound of Crows ‘cawing’) Wicked Witch: Bring on the crows! (Enter crows. Scarecrow pulls a silly face and they all retreat in terror) (Whole cast cheers, as Scarecrow struts up and down triumphantly) Wicked Witch: Hey! What happened to my crows? Narrator: (Pointing to Scarecrow) Well, he is a scarecrow, remember? (Wicked Witch stamps her foot in disgust) (Sound of bees buzzing) Wicked Witch: Bring on the black bees! (Enter bees. Each ‘stings’ Tin Woodman then ‘drops down dead’) (Whole cast cheers as Tin Woodman struts around victoriously) Wicked Witch: (Shrieking) Now what? What has happened to my black bees? Narrator: Er, I think you’ll find they just all died. Isn’t that what bees do, once they have stung? Wicked Witch: (Shaking fist) Drat! And double drat! Why didn’t I think of that? (Sound of marching feet) Wicked Witch: Bring on my Winkie Soldiers! (Enter Winkie Soldiers, marching purposefully towards ‘the group’) (Lion lets out a huge roar and the soldiers all panic and run away in terror) (Whole cast cheers as Cowardly Lion struts around triumphantly) (Wicked Witch screams her dismay) Wicked Witch: Right! That’s it! You’ve asked for it this time!
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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Christmas Play

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Christmas Play

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Christmas Play Cast of 30 (with some doubling up) Duration: around 30 minutes (without music suggestions) This is a fun, simple to produce a class play or assembly - it can also be used for panto purposes. After writing the set of guided reading scripts based on the story, I couldn't resist writing another play whilst the story and characters were still fresh in my head! Though Dorothy is not quite as 'wholesome' as in the original story and the Wizard of Oz is a little more 'versatile' in this version! Also available: • The Wizard of Oz Guided Reading Scripts (10 of these, with 6 speakers each; around 3 minutes each – total reading time around 30 minutes) • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Play – the non-Xmas version! Sample Text: (Toto reluctantly wags tail at Dorothy) Dorothy: (Patting Toto on the head) That’s better! An obedient pooch! Now we can get the show on the road! Toto: But, just as a matter of interest, what happened to that other Dorothy – the one I rehearsed with? Dorothy: (Dismissively) Oh didn’t you hear? She got caught up in one too many cyclones! Nasty business if you don’t get it right! (Sound of howling wind, followed by long scream) Music 2 Ding Dong the Witch is Dead Narrator: Good heavens! What on earth was that? (Enter Good Witch of the North, with great panache and thunderous applause from the cast, carrying a pair of silver shoes. She is accompanied by three Munchkins) Good Witch: (Curtseying to the cast) Ah thank you so much! (Cast continues to clap and cheer) Good Witch: Oh now, really. You’re too kind! Dorothy: (Scowling) I’ll say! How come I didn’t get that kind of reception? Good Witch: Oh dear! What’s with the scowly face? That’s not very pretty, dear! Toto: (To Good Witch) I think she’s a bit put out – that you seem to have stolen the show! Good Witch: (Incredulously) Stolen the show? Me? The Good Witch of the North? With all my panache and presence? Oh, surely not? (Good Witch twirls and beams broadly from ear to ear) Good Witch: (To Dorothy) I bet you too have loads of superstar qualities! (Pauses) Only, you’re just keeping them rather well hidden! Dorothy: Huh! I’ll have you know, some of us have business to attend to! Good Witch: Well, I have to hand it to you. Killing the Wicked Witch of the East was pretty smart! Toto: (Exclaiming) She what? Good Witch: (Waving silver shoes around) Oh yes! And here’s the evidence! Bit of inspiration, my dear, landing that house directly on top of the witch! Here are her shoes, all that’s left of her!
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Wizard of Oz Guided Reading Scripts

Wizard of Oz Guided Reading Scripts

Wizard of Oz Guided Reading Scripts (10) - 6 speakers each This ‘play’ was written primarily as a set of guided reading scripts or Readers Theater – to be used by 5 groups of 6 speakers. The 10 scripts can be divided into Scene I & II for Group 1, Scene III & IV for Group 2 etc; or a run of consecutive readings, going round twice e.g. Scene I for Group 1, Scene II for Group 2 etc. Conversely, the 10 scripts could be used by one group at a time i.e. for 10 or however many sessions it takes; or just straight through in around 30 minutes. These scripts could be combined to produce a play for performance, with the addition of directions, music suggestions and extra cast members plus props. Number of Scenes and Duration: There are 10 Scenes. Each of these is around 3 minutes reading time. 30 minutes in total. Cast The same 5 principal roles (Dorothy, Toto, Scarecrow, Tin Woodman and Cowardly Lion) are used in each scene. The additional 6th speaker is different each time with the exception of the last two scenes. In brackets after the cast list e.g. Scene I (‘Others - 3 Munchkins - BLUE – for class play) are the additional cast members that could be added for a performance play. These are not required for the guided reading scripts as they stand. Scene I Arrival in Land of Oz Cast · Dorothy · Toto · Scarecrow · Tin Woodman · Cowardly Lion Plus · Good Witch of the North (‘Others’ - 3 Munchkins - BLUE – for class play) Sample Text: Witch: (Interrupting) Oh, no mistake, my dear! Your house here took her out in one move. Can’t you see her feet sticking out from underneath? Toto: She’s right! Well, who would have thought it Scarecrow: (Sadly) Hmm. Thinking. Not my speciality! No brains to speak of, me! Dorothy: That’s what you think! Tin Woodman: But that’s just the point! He can’t – think, that is! Any more than I can feel! Dorothy: You are mistaken Cowardly Lion: Huh! You’ll be telling me I’m a brave creature, next! Dorothy: You are! Witch: (Impatiently) Well, much as I would like to stand around listening to you lot arguing all day – not! Let’s just say, it’s a blessing that cyclone brought you here all the way from Kansas
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Wind in the Willows Play or Set of Guided Reading Scripts

Wind in the Willows Play or Set of Guided Reading Scripts

Wind in the Willows Play or Set of Guided Reading Scripts This script is suitable for use as Guided Reading (Readers Theater) or for performance. Instead of being sold as two separate products, it is in effect 2 for the price of 1 – as the customer can use it for either purpose. Guided Reading: The 5 scenes can be used by 5 groups of 6 children i.e. a total of 30 altogether and simply read in the classroom, ‘around the table’. In this format, the music suggestions and ‘extra cast’ would obviously be dropped. Duration Around 25 to 30 minutes (about 5 minutes for each script) Play - for Performance Purposes: Use of the entire cast of 30: 6 speakers plus Woodland Creatures and Law Force, along with music suggestions. The length of performance can be reduced from 45 minutes plus to around 20 minutes by less use of music and the omission of one or more scenes. · Play/Performance: 30 minutes plus time for inclusion of music/routines – of around 15 minutes. Total: around 45 minutes – probably a bit longer. · Assembly or Class Play. The length of the play could be reduced to around 20 minutes by omitting one or more of the scenes. Sample Text: Badger: (Exploding) Toad learn his lesson? I don’t think so! Not with his Mole: (Interrupting hurriedly) More sandwiches, anyone? Badger: (To Mole) You’re way too soft on him, Mole. Toad: (Indignantly) Hello! I am still here you know! (Toad continues to fill his mouth with food) Badger: Taking advantage of your friends, as usual! (Badger helps himself to some sandwiches) Toad: Well, you don’t seem to be doing so badly, yourself! Good sandwiches? Badger: Indeed they are! You certainly know how to put together a fine picnic, Ratty! Ratty: Well, thank you. This ol’ brain of mine does have its uses! Mole: Such a clever animal! Badger: And just as well, some of the scrapes you lot got yourselves into! Gaoler: Oh, we know all about those! Stealing a car and driving it with no thought for the safety of others! Badger: That’s Toad, to a T! Toad: (Indignantly) Whatever do you mean? Badger: Just that, nine times of ten, you think of number one first! Toad: (Scratching head) Woah! Wait a minute! That’s way too many numbers! Badger: OK. Let me put it to you simply. (Pauses) You are one selfish, conceited creature! (Everyone gasps) Mole: Oh Badger! Must you? It’s such a lovely day and we were having such a fine time here by the river
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Aesop Fables Guided Reading Scripts

Aesop Fables Guided Reading Scripts

Aesop Fables Guided Reading Scripts SPECIAL HALF TERM OFFER: Set of 5 Guided Reading Scripts, from Aesop Fables - available individually @ £5.00 Special Offer - all 5 for £15 These scripts, 6 speakers each, can be used within the classroom, in English or PSHE, or for *performance. They each come with lesson plan, original story synopsis, discussion points and suggestions for further activities. *as separate plays (6 speakers), or one combined play(cast of 30) Five Aesop Fables: · The Lion and the Mouse · The Fox and the Stork · The Tortoise and the Hare · The Jay and the Peacocks · The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs The Five PSHE Themes are: · Friendship · Mutual Respect · Taking Time · Being Happy with Who and What we are · Being Satisfied with What We've Got Duration: Each script is between 5 and 10 minutes reading time. As each comes with additional activities, this resource is potentially five 20-30 minute lessons – so could be done over the course of a week or spread out over a longer period. Happy Customer: "I am so excited to use these! I was beginning to forget who I am as a teacher especially during guided reading because I was trying so hard to fit into my schools strict guided reading expectations and I think this will really help me discover me again. Thank you so much!" Rating: 4.0 So lovely to receive comments like this - within 24 hours of releasing these scripts! Thank you so much to this teacher - made my day! Currently working on a 5 scene/5 guided reading script adaptation of The Wind in the Willows. Hope it gets the same reception!
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Nature Assembly including the seasons

Nature Assembly including the seasons

Nature Assembly including the Seasons The writing of this assembly was prompted by an item on the news, revealing that many children remain very ‘out of touch’ with nature. This is the writer’s attempt to take a small step towards addressing that problem. What does it take to impress some children?! Find out in this journey through the Natural World. Nature is a massive subject so I have had to be very selective re choice of animals, plants, wildlife in general. The focus is very much on wildlife and again, to narrow things down a bit, I have focused on wildlife in the U.K. Apologies to other countries – I will happily write a script on your wildlife, should you request it! This is an extremely versatile script both in terms of cast size (written for 30 but could include more than one year group); duration - anything from 10 minutes upwards; and age group. Suitable for any age group The script can be adapted for any age group e.g. by adding additional information for older children, or taking out/replacing the existing text with simpler information for younger children. I have categorized it as Key Stage I (Children aged 5 – 7 years old) as this is the best ‘match’ for the script as it stands. However, the script could be used as a template for a Key Stage II script (7 – 11 year-olds) – with just additional information and increased sophistication of language. As there is such a wealth of resources that can be drawn from, this assembly could actually be put on by more than one year group. This assembly makes a brief reference to all four seasons. These are available as individual assemblies from TES and the Key Stage One – Assemblies – Science section of www.plays-r-ussell.com Sample Text: Child 19: Nettles – ouch! Child 20: Foxgloves – careful of their poison! Child 21: And let’s not forget – Forget me not! Child 22: Or our wonderful trees! Child 23: Horse Chestnut! Child 24: Beech! Child 25: Birch! Child 26: Oak! Child 27: Elm Child 28: And what about all those mushrooms? Narrator: You’re right! We could just keep adding on and adding on! What a wonderful world we live in! *End of this section of assembly (see Production Notes) (Child 1 remains scowling) Narrator: (Throwing up hands in dismay) Oh I give up! What can we do to impress you this morning? Child 2: Did you say impress? Narrator: I certainly did! Child 3: Well, just listen to these amazing facts. (Child 1 looks up, showing some interest) Narrator: Let’s hope they are amazing! Child 4: Did you know Child 5: The smallest bird i
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Friendship Play based on Wind in the Willows

Friendship Play based on Wind in the Willows

Friendship Play based on Wind in the Willows This script has a cast of 6 - the characters from Wind in the Willows giving advice on the subject of friendship. It can be used for performance (with music suggestions) or as a guided reading or Readers Theater script i.e. just for use within the classroom. Whilst there are clear literary links - with the classic by Kenneth Clarke - it is equally a PSHE resource, with additional teaching notes at the end focusing on what friendship is, the different types of friendship, what makes a good friend and how to cope when you do not have a friend. Duration: around 5 - 10 minutes reading plus teaching/discussion time (the latter obviously open-ended). Sample Text: Badger: It’s just as well you have such understanding friends. You don’t deserve them. Toad: (Tearfully) Oh I know! There I go again! I really can’t stop myself, sometimes! Badger: Sometimes? Ratty: Make that, pretty much all the time! Mole: Oh, but he does have some very fine qualities. Toad: Indeed! Intelligence, wit, Badger: (Shouting) Toad! Toad: What? What? Badger: You’re off again! Blowing your own trumpet! Toad: Well, someone has to! Badger: But not you – all the time! Mole: Oh Toad. I think you’re a very fine creature Ratty: Mole! You’re too kind! Badger: Way too kind! Child: But it’s nice he’s standing up for his friend! Narrator: Yes, he’s doing what all good friends do. Toad: Looking out for me. Thanks, Mole! Mole: My pleasure! I know you’d do the same for me! Badger: Huh! Providing he wasn’t too busy! Toad: Well, I know I’m not perfect. (Pauses) Well, not far off Badger: (Warningly) Toad! Toad: OK! OK! But you do all still love me, right? Mole: Of course we do! Ratty: Though you don’t always make it easy for us! Badger: You can say that again! Mole: We’ll always be there for you, Toad. Isn’t that right, Ratty? Ratty: (Sighing) I guess! That is what friends are for. Standing by each other. Toad: Excellent! After all, I am rather a splendid creature! Badger: (Angrily) Toad! Do you never learn? Many other PSHE scripts on such themes as bullying, self-esteem, mutual respect etc and cast of 6 plays available from TES and www.plays-r-ussell.com
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Summer Assembly for Key Stage One

Summer Assembly for Key Stage One

Summer Assembly for Key Stage One Sunshine and the seaside - how can you not love the summer? Have a word with our poor narrator - first it's hay fever and then ... that wasp! Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down. Duration - around 10 minutes, though this can be extended with the addition of suggested poems. This is one of a collection of assemblies on The Seasons - the others all available separately (Autumn, Winter and Spring) from this website and www.plays-r-ussell.com Sample Text: (Sound of another kind of buzzing) (Whole cast fling their arms around, in agitation) (Enter wasp, Child 29) Narrator: Oh dear! Just when everything was so perfect! A wasp! Wasp: Hey! That’s not very nice! Narrator: And neither are you! Always making a nuisance of yourself! Wasp: Well, I do love those picnics! Narrator: But we don’t love you! Especially not your stings! Wasp: Well, (looking at the cast) if you wouldn’t all wave your arms around! That just gets me really angry! Narrator: And there’s nothing worse than an angry wasp! (Narrator swats wasp away with a piece of newspaper) Narrator: Be off with you!
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Winter Assembly or Class Play for Key Stage I

Winter Assembly or Class Play for Key Stage I

Winter Assembly for Key Stage One Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down Duration: Around 10 - 15 minutes. This length can be extended by the addition of suggested poems. Brrrr! .... surely there's a bit more to be said about winter than this?! Well, if left to our cast it would just be the sound of snoring - any excuse to follow the lead of that hibernating hedgehog. Fortunately, you can always rely on a bit of Disney to revive flagging spirits - plus some snowball fights and a few words from our rockin robin! This is one of a set of plays on The Seasons - all available as separate purchases. Sample Text (Enter group of children all dressed in winter clothes) Child 23 – 27: (Together) We’re all warm! Narrator: And how is that? Child 23: I have a warm woolly hat! Child 24: I have a warm woolly scarf! Child 25: I have warm woolly gloves! Child 26: I have warm woolly socks and welly boots! Child 27: And we all have Child 23 – 27: Warm woolly coats to keep us warm! (Exit group of children) Narrator: Hmm! Warm and woolly seems to work! Music 5 Rockin Robin – Michael Jackson (Enter Robin/Child 28 dancing to song that is sung by rest of the cast) Narrator: (Applauding) Well, that was very upbeat! (To robin) You don’t seem to have any problems with the cold weather! Robin: Well, it’s not always easy, you know! And I am always grateful to those kind people that leave me food out in their gardens! Narrator: Well, you are our favourite national bird Robin: And those Christmas cards just wouldn’t be the same without me, right? Narrator: Right! (Exit Robin) (Sound of loud snoring, from the cast) Narrator: Hey! What’s going on? Music 6 All I have to do is dream – Everly Brothers (Optional excerpt – first couple of bars) (Enter very sleepy hedgehog/Child 29) Hedgehog: (Rubbing eyes) Oh! Where’s my bed? I must have sleepwalked off, by mistake!
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David and Goliath Assembly, Class Play or Guided Reading Script

David and Goliath Assembly, Class Play or Guided Reading Script

David and Goliath Assembly, Class Play or Guided Reading Script Cast of 10 Duration: 5 - 10 minutes reading time (not including music suggestions) This play may be used as an assembly for performance, or a play or guided reading script within the classroom. Along with delivering the story of David and Goliath, there are brief notes at the end to facilitate further discussion - on the themes of bullying, self-belief and self-strength. There are numerous other scripts on these themes in the PSHE section of the website including one on bullying which could be combined with this script to produce a longer play. Sample Text Goliath: Well, let’s see if he can work the same magic (pauses) on the battlefield! David: Against you? I’m more than up for it! King Saul: But that’s insane! Servant: Yes, begging your pardon, but how can you possibly hope to win (pauses, pointing at Goliath) against that? David: (Shrugging his shoulders, casually) What’s to prove? He’s just (pauses) Servant: (Interrupting) Big? Philistine Soldier 1: (Clapping) Bravo! Philistine Soldier 2: (Clapping) So you noticed? David: Huh! Size isn’t everything! (Goliath strides over to David, towering above him) Goliath: Oh really? (David stands his ground, unflinching) David: Yes, really! You don’t frighten me, you great bully! There’s more to winning a battle than sheer brawn, you know. Narrator: No, I rather fear he doesn’t know. I’m not even sure he understands what you’re saying! Goliath: (Furiously) Understand what you’re saying? What’s to understand, that’s what I want to know! Narrator: Quite! My point exactly! (David starts to walk away) Goliath: Huh! I knew he wouldn’t stick around! A coward, like the rest of you! King Saul: Oh, don’t be so ridiculous! Look at you! All ready in your battle gear! Does my lad David look ready to you? Goliath: Well, now you come to mention it King Saul: So. If you don’t mind, we’ll just take a short time to get David into my armour and David: (Interrupting) Oh don’t worry! That won’t be necessary! I’m pretty much good to go! King Saul: But what about some protection? A body shield at least? David: No, no. That won’t be necessary, either. I know what I need and I’ll be back in a minute. (Exit David) Goliath: Bah! Just an excuse to do a runner! You wait! There’s no way that wee boy is coming back to take on me!
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Spring Assembly

Spring Assembly

Spring Assembly This is the first of a series of Seasons Assemblies written for Key Stage I. This first one covers 20 plus 'first signs of spring' and includes a reference to the first chapter of Wind in the Willows, with Mole and Rat extolling the joys of the riverbank! Cast of 30 (easily adaptable up or down) It is suggested that the class teacher takes the role of narrator. Duration: Around 10 – 15 minutes including poems and music suggestions Sample Text: (Young animals ‘run rings around’ Narrator who gets increasingly exasperated) Narrator: (Sighing) Huh! I was forgetting those young animals! (Narrator jumping out of their way) Narrator: Oh dear! Is it just me or does it suddenly seem a bit crowded around here? Mother Rabbit: But didn’t you say, you loved Spring? Narrator: Oh yes! But .. (Bunnies and lambs keep jumping up at Narrator) Narrator: (To Mother Rabbit and Mother Sheep) Could you not keep your offspring under slightly better control? (Mother Rabbit and Mother Sheep ‘round up’ their offspring and return to their seats, scowling) Narrator: Oh dear! And there I was saying how much I loved Spring! But it’s not just about baby animals, you know! (Enter Child 6 dressed as Mole and Child 7 as Rat) Narrator: Ah! Two of my favourite characters from The Wind in the Willows! Mole: (Bowing) I’m Mole! Very pleased to meet you! Rat: And I’m Rat! Known as Ratty to my friends
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Autumn Assembly

Autumn Assembly

Autumn Assembly for Key Stage I One of a set of assemblies on the Seasons. Cast of 30 - easily adjustable up or down. It is suggested that the class teacher takes the role of narrator. Duration - around 10 minutes but can be extended with inclusion of list of suggested poems Swallows, squirrels, deer, bats, .... children! Our narrator certainly has his work cut out keeping this assembly under control! Ever tried keeping a hibernating hedgehog or two sleepy dormice awake? Or silencing a flock of Brent Geese? Just two of the tasks facing our, as always, seriously challenged narrator! Sample Text: (Dormice curl up together and drop off to sleep) Narrator: Hey you two! Not yet! Wake up! (Both dormice yawn and stretch sleepily) Dormouse 1: Is it April yet? Dormouse 2: I think I’ll leave it to May this year! Dormice: (Together) Yeah! Let’s have a lie in! Narrator: You most certainly will not! Do I look like a Dormouse babysitter? Be off with you! (Exit Bats and Dormice) (Enter Hedgehog, making loud snuffling noises; he collects up some of the leaves left behind by the children, makes a nest of them and lies down in the middle) Narrator: Aha! And who do we have here? Our first hibernating hedgehog! Hedgehog: (Huffily getting out ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign and placing it next to his nest) Can’t you read? Narrator: You’re a bit early! It’s not November yet! Hedgehog: So? (Putting on night cap) (Rubbing tummy) I’ve done enough eating! I’m ready for sleep!
suesplays
The Good Samaritan Assembly or Class Play Cast of 10

The Good Samaritan Assembly or Class Play Cast of 10

The Good Samaritan Assembly or Class Play - CAST OF 10 NB: This play, cast of 10, is a re-telling of the parable with complementary discussion notes on the bystander effect. (The full-length assembly with a cast of 30 (separate purchase) starts with this same cast of 10 but has an additional 20 speakers dealing with ‘the bystander effect’ with reference to today’s society, delivered via five different scenarios). This script with a cast of 10 can be read in around 10 minutes (not including music suggestions at beginning and end). It is, of course, one of the best-known parables from the Bible and so can be used in an R.E. lesson or for Church and Sunday School activities. It has particular relevance in our world today and can thus be used for PSHE and Citizenship classes - the play acting as an introduction to a lesson on The Bystander Effect with all its implications for us as a society. Sample Text (Enter Good Samaritan) Jewish Man: Oh hello! And who do we have this time? (Groaning) Oh! A Samaritan! Just my luck! There’s no way he’s going to stop! (Good Samaritan bends over Jewish Man and offers to help him up) Good Samaritan: Oh dear! Whatever happened to you? Here, let me help you up. Jewish Man: Well, that’s very kind. And very unexpected! Good Samaritan: Whatever do you mean? Jewish Man: Well. You being a Samaritan and me being a Jew. We’re not exactly ‘on the same team’ so to speak, are we? Good Samaritan: And since when did ‘being on the same team’ have anything to do with looking out for your fellow human beings? Oh dear, you’ve taken a real beating there. I’m so sorry. Here, let me put some bandaging on those sores. (Good Samaritan takes bandages from his bag, and pours oil and wine over them) This should make you feel better. Jewish Man: You are so kind! Thank you so much. Good Samaritan: (Laughing) It’s nothing! You didn’t really think I’d leave you here? Just walk on by? Jewish Man: I most certainly did! Good Samaritan: (Laughing) Ridiculous! You seem to have lost all faith in your fellow mankind! Jewish Man: Well, let’s just say you just restored it – my faith in mankind, that is. Thank you again.
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Online Safety Assembly or Class Play

Online Safety Assembly or Class Play

Online Safety Assembly or Class Play Cast of 10 – 30 (or above) The script is written for a cast of 30 but this number can easily be adjusted up or down as 25 of the speaking parts are Child 1 – 25 i.e. non-specific. Duration: 10 - 15 minutes (not including music suggestions) Whilst this is obviously a very serious subject there are still plenty of opportunities for humour in this performance - largely supplied by two well-meaning but rather naive grandparents! Sample Text Child 13: There are things you should be aware of. Child 14: And the most important of these is to do with your safety. Grandma: Oh, I always switch everything off at night, don’t you worry! Grandpa: (Patting Grandma’s knee) No dear. I don’t think that’s the kind of safety they are talking about. Just listen! Child 15: The internet allows us to explore a whole new world Child 16: We can go to countries we’ve never been to Child 17: And meet people in the farthest reaches of the globe. Child 18: But whilst the majority of these people are good Child 19: And use the internet for all the right reasons Child 20: There are many that do not. Child 21: They want to get to know you for all the wrong reasons. Child 22: They may want your money Child 23: They may want to take your identity and use it for bad purposes. Child 24: Never ever give out personal information to people you do not know. Child 25: In fact, do not have anything to do with people you do not know. Anyone, apart from your family and your friends, is a stranger. Grandma: (Indignantly) But I like strangers! You wouldn’t believe the number of times they’ve helped me across the road! Child 1: But that’s different. We are talking about strangers online. Child 2: People you’ve never met Child 3: People you know nothing about. Other PSHE plays on such themes as bullying, improved self-esteem, confidence etc available off TES and www.plays-r-ussell.com
suesplays
The Good Samaritan Assembly or Class Play Cast of 30

The Good Samaritan Assembly or Class Play Cast of 30

The Good Samaritan Assembly or Class Play Cast of 30 NB: The other play, with a cast of 10, available as a separate purchase, is a re-telling of the parable with complementary discussion notes on the bystander effect. This full-length assembly with a cast of 30 starts with this same cast of 10 but has an additional 20 speakers dealing with ‘the bystander effect’ with reference to today’s society, delivered via five different scenarios. Duration - around 15 to 20 minutes Sample Text Scenario 1 - A young boy/teenager being beaten up by a group of other teenage boys (Enter 5 boys and 5 bystanders) (Bystanders in two groups, chatting amongst themselves; group of five boys chatting/messing around) (Suddenly four boys ‘fall out’ with the fifth boy and set upon him, ‘beating him to the ground’) (Bystanders look on bewildered before walking off hurriedly) (Four boys do a ‘high five’ and walk off, leaving the fifth boy, sprawled on the ground, moaning) (Enter Good Samaritan, who helps boy to his feet and helps him back to his seat) Narrator: (Jumping out of his seat) Bravo! You’ve done it again! Good Samaritan to the rescue! Good Samaritan: So, what about those other people who were there and witnessed what happened? Where did they go? Let’s call them back. (Good Samaritan gestures to five bystanders to come and join him) Good Samaritan: So. What was going on there? Explain yourselves, please. Bystander 1: Oh, you know how it is. Bystander 2: Boys will be boys! Bystander 3: Just thought we’d let them get on with it. Bystander 4: Nothing to do with us! Bystander 5: We didn’t want to get involved Good Samaritan: So. Let’s get this straight. You were happy to risk that young boy being severely injured. Perhaps worse. Bystander 1: (Laughing nervously) Oh let’s not exaggerate! (All bystanders nod in agreement) Good Samaritan: But you didn’t know he’d be all right, did you? (All bystanders shuffle their feet nervously and look to the ground) Good Samaritan: No, you didn’t! Shame on you for walking away! Bystander 2: But what could I have done? Bystander 3: I’m no fighter! Bystander 4: What if they’d turned on me? Bystander 5: I didn’t want to get hurt! Good Samaritan: So, it was OK to let someone else get hurt? Bystander 1: Well, Good Samaritan: (Exploding) No it wasn’t! And you all know it!
suesplays
Gold Rush Assembly

Gold Rush Assembly

Gold Rush Assembly Four discontented groups - the Forty-Niners, the Wives, the Native Americans and the San Francisco Residents. And just one happy group - The Entrepreneurs. Looks like our Narrator has his work cut out, yet again! A tale of mixed fortunes - fortunately, the tragedy alleviated by plenty of humour along with a great playlist! Cast of 30 (easily adaptable up or down) Duration: 10 to 15 minutes not including music suggestions/routines (which could double length of performance) Other scripts on American history available from TES and www.plays-r-ussell.com Sample Text: Narrator: Oh my goodness. Where did all that Californian sunshine go? (Enter Group 1) Forty-niner 1: You still here? Forty-niner 2: He must have got left behind. (Enter Group 2) Wife 1: Like us! Forty-niner 3: (To others in Group 1) Run, boys! Looks like our wives have caught up with us! (Group 2 bar the way to Group 1 ‘escaping’) Wife 2: Nah! We decided it shouldn’t be you having all the fun! We’re coming too! (Collective groan from Group 1) Wife 3: You see, you are not the only ones with hopes around here. Music 2 Money Money Money – Abba (Performed by Group 2) (Group 1 applaud at end of ‘routine’) Forty-niner 3: Wow! Seems like we have some talent here! Forty-niner 4: Maybe we can cash in on that when we reach our destination. Forty-niner 5: Yeah! I’ve heard there’s plenty of opportunities in San Francisco! Forty-niner 6: Is that where we’re going? Forty-niner 7: (Holding up map) Well, it looks close enough to where all that gold is supposed to be! Forty-niner 8: So. What are we waiting for? Forty-niner 1: Come on, everyone! Let’s go find that gold! (Exit Groups 1 and 2, cheering loudly) Narrator: Wow! Amazing how quickly the mood can change around here! One minute right down in the doldrums. The next scaling the heights of delight! (Enter Group 4, muttering and scowling) Narrator: (To audience) Oh oh! Something tells me that moodometer is about to take another plunge for the worst! (Turning to Group 4) Hi guys! Something not quite right in your neck of the woods? San Francisco, I believe? S.F. Resident 1: Well, I wonder how happy you’d be if your neighbourhood was suddenly invaded Narrator: (Interrupting) Oh you mean by those ‘Forty-niners’?
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Rio 2016 Olympic Games Quiz

Rio 2016 Olympic Games Quiz

Rio 2016 Olympic Games Quiz 100 questions and answers on the 2016 Olympic Games! Sample Text: 1. How many sports will there be at the 2016 Olympic Games? (28) Ball Games 2. Name four ‘ball games’. (Tennis, table tennis, football and rugby) 3. Name two names for table tennis. (Whiff Waff or Flim Flam) 4. How many players, per team, are there for volley ball? (6) 5. How many for beach volley ball? (2) 6. How many new ball games have been introduced for 2016?(2) 7. What are they?(Rugby and golf) 8. What does the term ‘dunkin’ mean in basketball? (To slam a ball through the net) 9. From which bird do the feathers attached to a shuttlecock come? (Goose) Archery, Shooting and Fencing 10. When was it compulsory for all English men aged between seven and sixty to be able to use a bow and arrow? (Fourteenth century) 11. Why was this considered necessary? (In order to defend their country) 12. What three types of gun are used for shooting? (Pistol, rifle and shotgun) Other scripts available from Sue Russell: ASSEMBLIES Brazil Host Country to 2016 Rio Olympics Olympics PRIDE Assembly (PSHE 'team spirit' script) Olympic Games 2016 Leavers Assembly Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly - covering all 28 sports History of the Olympics Assembly Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly: history and events - combined script including Olympic Ode Olympics Assembly for Key Stage 1 Rio 2016 Paralympics 2016 Assembly GUIDED READING SCRIPTS A Complete History of the Olympic Games Guided Reading Scripts plus quizzes - set of 8 scripts, plus quizzes Olympics PRIDE Guided Reading OLYMPIC ODE
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Aesop Fables The Lion and the Mouse Guided Reading Script

Aesop Fables The Lion and the Mouse Guided Reading Script

Aesop Fables: The Lion and the Mouse Guided Reading Script plus lesson plan including teaching input, synopsis, guided reading script, discussion points and suggestions for further work. Cast of 6, around 10 minutes reading time Lesson: 20 – 30 minutes, depending on how much of the lesson plan is used. The material could, of course, be split over a series of sessions. The script can be used either as a guided reading script (6 readers) or as a mini performance (cast of 6); and could be used either in a Literacy or PSHE class (owing to the life lessons contained within the text) Sample Text Lion: Because sometimes you need to listen to someone else, take their advice Mouse: However small they are! And that’s exactly what he did! Lion: Yes, I listened Teacher: And then was ‘big’ enough to act on that advice! See, sometimes you can become big by the smallest actions! Pupil 2: (To Lion) So you let the mouse go? Lion: That’s right! Was I the champ? Or was I the champ? Mouse: (Coughing) Eh hem! Small matter of what I said to you? Lion: Ah yes! You mean, helping me out at some future event Mouse: When you, my large friend, might actually need me! Pupil 1: (To Lion) And did you? I mean, need your wee friend? Lion: Oh, I most certainly did! I wouldn’t be standing here talking to you today if I hadn’t let my rodent friend here go! Narrator: So, what happened? Lion: I got caught by hunters, is what happened! Soon after bidding farewell to Mouse here, I managed to fall into a trap and get all tied up in knots! Mouse: (Laughing) How very careless of you! Lion: No laughing matter, I can assure you! If you, Mouse, hadn’t come along and rescued me Pupil 2: (Gasping) What? You, a mighty lion, rescued by a mini mouse? Lion: Indeed. And I’m not ashamed to admit it. Teacher: Which makes you an even bigger, grander lion in my opinion! Pupil 1: And mine! Pupil 2: (Spluttering) But, but, wasn’t it just the tiniest bit humiliating – being rescued by a mere mouse? Mouse: (Sighing) Oh dear! I can see we might just have to spell this one out! This is the first of a series of Aesop Fables adapted scripts - more to follow!
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Robin Hood Assembly or Class Play

Robin Hood Assembly or Class Play

Robin Hood Assembly or Class Play Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down. Duration - around 15 minutes reading time. This does not include *music suggestions/dance routines which could potentially double the length of the performance. So, are those Merry Men about to have their smiles turned upside down? Never! Not even in the face of those brutish Guards? Double never! Not when you've got some neat tricks/moves up the sleeves of your tunic! See how good triumphs over evil without any blood being shed - it is a family show! *Sample Playlist • Bad – Michael Jackson • I Need a Hero – Bonnie Tyler • Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting – Carl Douglas • Happy – Pharrell Williams Sample Text Narrator: Hey! You might think you’re a hero! Peasant 1: But you haven’t done anything yet! Narrator: Right! All that dancing and prancing! Peasant 2: You need to demonstrate to us that you’re a hero! Narrator: No more theatrics! Peasant 3: Prove yourself! Narrator: Stop all this lovey dovey stuff – that can wait til later! Peasant 4: It’s our futures you need to change! Peasant 5: Show us you’re the man you say you are! Peasant 6: Take on those baddies! Peasant 7: Be our hero! Robin Hood: Hey! Steady on! I may be pretty good with this bow and arrow Maid Marion: (Sighing) The best, or so I’ve heard! Robin Hood: But taking on the whole of Prince John’s crowd? Whoa! That’s a tall order! (Enter Little John, squaring up to his great height) Little John: Well, I, Little John, am more than up to the challenge! (Enter rest of Merry Men) Friar Tuck: And you can count me, Friar Tuck, in! Alan-a-Dale: And me, Alan-a-Dale! Will Scarlet: And me, Will Scarlet! Much the Miller’s Son: And me, Much the Miller’s Son! Narrator: (Clutching head) Oh wow! That’s some fighting force you have there, Robin! An overweight man of the church, a minstrel, an ex-soldier and a miller’s son! Peasant 1: (Sarcastically) Wonderful! Peasant 2: More than enough to take on Prince John’s men! Peasant 3: They won’t know what’s hit them! Peasant 4: The friar’s belly Peasant 5: The minstrel’s lute Peasant 6: The ex-soldier’s rusting sword Peasant 7: Or the miller’s son’s bag of flour! Peasant 1: Some army! Come on, folks. Let’s leave this lot to their fantasies! (Exit Peasants, muttering sadly) (Enter Prince John, Sheriff of Nottingham and Sir Guy of Gisborne plus Guards) Sir Guy of Gisborne: (To Robin Hood) Aha! The villain himself! Seize him, guards! (Guards seize Robin Hood) Maid Marion: Why you cowards! Seven against one! I’d hardly say that was fair! Sheriff of Nottingham: (Laughing) But hadn’t you heard, sweet lady? Nothing is fair around here!
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Odysseus and the Cyclops lesson plan, guided reading script & quiz

Odysseus and the Cyclops lesson plan, guided reading script & quiz

Odysseus and the Cyclops lesson plan, guided reading script & quiz Each 'package' consists of lesson plan plus guided reading script (6 speakers) plus quiz/reading comprehension. Lesson Plan (Around 20 - 30 minutes) The lesson time can be reduced to 20 minutes by e.g. omission of quiz/discussion. The script takes around 10 minutes reading time. The quiz takes around 5 – 10 minutes. These resources accommodate both small group and all class engagement. As explained in the lesson plan, whilst a group of six speakers read the script, the rest of the class (divided into teams) follows in order to answer questions that follow. There are also some ideas for follow up discussion, time permitting. Time allowance is flexible - from 20 to 30 minutes, depending on how much of the package is used. This script, along with four others (Theseus and the Minotaur, The Gorgon's Head, Pandora's Box and The Tale of Two Spinners) is available as one product - The Ancient Greek Myths Guided Reading Scripts Sample text: Greek warrior 2 (laughing): Yes, we’ve heard how being a blacksmith was just a little bit too taxing for you! Did being born with only one eye mean you were only born with half a brain? Cyclops 2: How rude! Though I guess it was a shame we forgot our old blacksmith skills. Polyphemus: Even though I would never have driven a red-hot stake into the eye of any creature. Greek warrior 1: Not even one that was holding you captive, and eating 2 men for breakfast and supper, every day? Odysseus: Real convenience food, we were! Polyphemus: Well, you did make a welcome change from lamb stew! Poseidon: Enough! Here I am, trying to defend you, Polyphemus, and all you can do is confirm their story! What are you? Stupid, or something? Sample Quiz/Reading Comprehension Questions • What animals did Cyclops look after? • What trade had Zeus originally trained the Cyclops for? • How did Polyphemus prevent Odysseus and his men from escaping from his cave? • Why did the Cyclops not help Polyphemus? • What did Odysseus use to dull Polyphemus’s senses ..even more?
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