Hero image

Sue Russell's Shop

Average Rating3.55
(based on 46 reviews)

I have just started adding my plays to TES (over 400)!but this will take time! All my assemblies/class plays and guided reading scripts are on www.plays-r-ussell.com and I am happy to write on request. I have converted the entire History Key Stage II curriculum into play format - and much of the other subjects such as Science, Geography, PSHE etc. I cover events such as the Olympics and have received great feedback from teachers around the world! Writing is my passion - hope you enjoy my work!

207Uploads

234k+Views

7k+Downloads

I have just started adding my plays to TES (over 400)!but this will take time! All my assemblies/class plays and guided reading scripts are on www.plays-r-ussell.com and I am happy to write on request. I have converted the entire History Key Stage II curriculum into play format - and much of the other subjects such as Science, Geography, PSHE etc. I cover events such as the Olympics and have received great feedback from teachers around the world! Writing is my passion - hope you enjoy my work!
Evolution Assembly or Class Play
suesplayssuesplays

Evolution Assembly or Class Play

(0)
Evolution Assembly or Class Play Cast of 30 (easily adjustable) Duration: Around 20 minutes without the inclusion of music suggestions. This script has ‘serious factual content’ including a timeline from the beginning of time to the present, but it has plenty of humour including a seriously bad set of jokes at the end! This assembly or class play is based on the Evolution and Inheritance unit of study and has the following coverage: How fossils record changes that living things undergo over millions of years Shared characteristics of parents and offspring Adaptation and evolution of animals and plants in order to survive in different habitats/how characteristics are acquired rather than inherited/natural selection How creatures change over long periods of time Sample Text: (Enter Giant Tortoise slowly) Narrator: (Sarcastically) In your own time! Giant Tortoise: Hey! No need to rush! And it’s not like I have any predators to run from. Narrator: Just as well! Have you had far to come? Giant Tortoise: I live on the Galapagos islands, off the South American coast. Narrator: Whoa! That’s a long way! Giant Tortoise: Not as far as Mr Darwin travelled on his five-year trip! Narrator: So, you met the great man? (Enter Finch) Finch: We certainly did! Took some of us home with him! (Enter Darwin) Darwin: (To Giant Tortoise and Finch) You got me thinking about (To Giant Tortoise) Different patterned shells (To Finch) Different shaped beaks. You see, these creatures were different on each island suggesting they had adapted to their immediate environment. Giant Tortoise & Finch: (Together) Fascinating! (Exit Giant Tortoise & Finch) Narrator: Shall we look at some other examples? Darwin: (Enthusiastically) Certainly! Music 3 Parade of the Charioteers (Enter Stag and Peacock, both strutting proudly across stage) Stag: Look at my fine antlers! (Looks at audience) Anyone want to take me on? Peacock: Huh! No need for any violence! Just look at my magnificent display (opens tail to full effect). Who could not be impressed with me? Narrator: (Thoughtfully) Hmm. They are rather winning features Stag: It’s called ‘survival of the fittest’! Peacock: You’ve gotta have what it takes you know!
International Children's Book Day Assembly or Class Play
suesplayssuesplays

International Children's Book Day Assembly or Class Play

(0)
International Children's Book Day Assembly or Class Play This script was written in celebration of International Children's Book Day April 2nd 2017 including characters from Horrid Henry, Peter Pan, The Gruffalo, Charlotte's Web, Captain Underpants, Matilda, The Tales of Narnia, Alice in Wonderland and The Very Hungry Caterpillar. NB This is the same script as World Book Day Assembly but adapted to International Children's Book Day. Cast of 30 (easily adapted up or down) Duration: Around 20 minutes not including music suggestions Sample Text: Narrator: Thank you! Of course there is so much to celebrate in the world of literature! All those wonderful inspirational characters! (Enter Horrid Henry, scowling) Horrid Henry: Dah! I suppose you’ve got a whole line up of squeaky clean characters for us today? Just got one word to say to that – BORING! Narrator: And you are? (Pauses) Oh, don’t tell me – Horrid Henry! (Aside to Audience) A shame he had to start us off today! Definitely not one of our more likeable characters! (To Henry) Now, if you don’t mind, I do have a lot of other, shall we say ‘more wholesome characters’ to introduce! Horrid Henry: (Scowling) Please yourself! (Exit Horrid Henry, giving exaggerated ‘yawns’) Narrator: (To Audience) Oh dear! Sorry about that! Let’s see if we can ‘raise the bar’ a little! (Peter Pan ‘flies’ onto the stage) Narrator: Ah! Peter Pan! How nice to meet you! Peter Pan: The pleasure is all mine! (Enter Wendy and Tinkerbell) Peter Pan: I’d like you to meet Wendy: (Curtseying) Wendy (looking at Peter Pan adoringly) Darling! Tinkerbell: (Trying to ‘swoosh’ Wendy out of the way) And Peter’s favourite, Tinkerbell! Peter Pan: (Laughing) Now, now Tinkerbell! We have spoken about that jealousy thing! (Tinkerbell pulls a face, sulking) Wendy: Oh but she’s so adorable! You can’t be cross with her for long! (Enter Horrid Henry) Horrid Henry: What was I saying about those yukky sugary-sweet characters? Time to introduce some more interesting ones! (Horrid Henry beckons to Captain Cook and Crocodile) (Enter Captain Cook and Crocodile, snapping at Narrator’s heels) Narrator: (Angrily) Who let this beast on here? (Glaring at Horrid Henry) Oh I might have known you’d be up to no good!
Baghdad Early Islamic Civilisation Assembly or Class Play
suesplayssuesplays

Baghdad Early Islamic Civilisation Assembly or Class Play

(1)
Baghdad Early Islamic Civilization Assembly Cast size: 30 - easily adaptable up or down as, besides the Narrator, the speaking parts are just numbered 1 - 29. Duration: Around 15 minutes reading time (not including music suggestions) This assembly is intended as a celebration of learning and toleration. And it is to this end that the focus is on the work of the individual scholars, working in unison in Baghdad, during this Golden Age. Included is a brief comparison of ‘East and West’– comparing London and Baghdad. Also available from Sue Russell: • Baghdad Early Islamic Civilisation Guided Reading Scripts 5 scripts, 6 speakers each, plus quiz for each script. Approximately 5 minutes reading time for each (not including the quiz) 1. When? 2. Where? 3. The Story of Muhammed 4. Beliefs of Islam 5. World Religions And • An Assembly on Islam which tells the story of Muhammed and gives a brief outline of Islamic beliefs Sample Text: Music 1 Golden Years – David Bowie; or Imagine – John Lennon (Children file in, taking places along two rows of 15, facing the audience) Narrator: Good morning and welcome to our assembly on Whole cast: (Together) Baghdad and Early Islamic Civilisation (Child 1, 2 and 3 stand up with 3 banners: Golden Age, Learning and Tolerance) Narrator: Aha! And when was this Golden Age? Child 1: It was between the seventh and thirteenth centuries. That is, around six to twelve hundred A.D. Narrator: That’s a long time (looking towards Child 2 and 3) to be learned and tolerant! Child 4: Oh. You’d be surprised what mankind is capable of when the conditions are right! Narrator: (Looking at cast) Well. I think we need to find out what these ‘conditions’ were, don’t you? (Narrator ushers Child 2 and 3 with banners Learning and Tolerance to front of ‘stage’) After all, aren’t Learning (Child 2 waves banner) And Tolerance Child 3 waves banner) Two of the most important ingredients to a happy and stable society? Child 4: And a happy and stable school! Child 5: Yes, we (gesturing to cast) have all learned a huge amount about the importance of Learning and Tolerance Child 6: Just by doing this assembly! Narrator: How so? Child 7: Well, we’ve learned all about this amazing civilisation that we knew nothing about before Child 8: And we’ve learned how it actually was, and is, possible to work together for the greater good.
Stone Age to Iron Age Assembly or Class Play
suesplayssuesplays

Stone Age to Iron Age Assembly or Class Play

(0)
Stone Age to Iron Age Class Play Cast of 30 – easily adjustable up or down Duration: 15 to 20 minutes not including music suggestions This is one of two scripts written by Sue Russell and was written for upper Key Stage II (9 – 11 year olds). The second, Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age - also available off this website - was written as a simplified version of this one, for lower Key Stage II i.e. 7 – 9 year olds. This script has a truly wide-ranging cast that includes a hunter gatherer, a farmer, some guys with ropes from Stonehenge, a 'Rolling Stone', a caveman, ape, cast of Ice Age, a Celt, Iron Man ... and a Narrator and Archaeologist that just can't seem to get on! Starting 9 million years ago and running through all three 'ages': Stone, Bronze and Iron (yes, the play does take 'ages'!) this is an informative but, as usual, fun romp through history - with one long-suffering narrator! I chose to try to explain a little about evolution and how Stone Age Man 'came about' so as to put the aforementioned Ages into context. There is a phenomenal amount of information to cover in this 'Unit' but I hope I have covered the most important changes in this class play. The guided reading scripts, which can be read in the classroom, to accompany this class play, will I hope offer a more comprehensive coverage of the subject, with the usual quizzes to assess knowledge gained. Sample Text: Whole Cast: (Together) The Stone Age! Narrator: Ah! There we are! Now, that’s progress for you! (Enter Hunter Gatherer) (Narrator looks him up and down) Narrator: Hmm. Well, maybe not that much progress! (Exit Hunter Gatherer, shrugging his shoulders) Child 9: (To Narrator, angrily) Patience! Evolution takes time! It doesn’t just happen overnight, you know! Narrator: (Looking at his watch) I’m beginning to realise that. Now, where are we on that timeline? Child 8: (To Narrator, impatiently) Around 2 and a half million years ago! Weren’t you listening? When man starting using stone tools! That’s why it’s called Whole cast: (Together) The Stone Age! Narrator: OK! We got that! But how do we know that’s when stone tools were used? (Enter Archaeologist) Archaeologist: (To Narrator) You asking more questions again? Narrator: Well, Archaeologist: (Interrupting) That’s OK! That’s why I’m hired to do my job! To give people like you evidence!
Superheroes Assembly for Key Stage I
suesplayssuesplays

Superheroes Assembly for Key Stage I

(0)
Superheroes Assembly for Key Stage I Duration: Around 10 – 15 minutes depending on how many ‘superhero demonstrations’ there are. The first ‘speaking’ part of the assembly is around 5 minutes reading time. The rest of the assembly is down to the teacher in charge as explained in Production Notes. Cast: Written for cast of 30 but easily adaptable up or down. The cast comprises class teacher as narrator plus children 1 – 30. This assembly or class play is in roughly two parts - the first deals with the qualities of a superhero and how a superhero would change the world; the second is a demonstration of 'superpowers' by different 'superheroes'. It is very much a 'movable feast' - the children can make their own choices re: how they'd change the world; and likewise choose which superheroes they'd like to portray - they can even make up their own. I have thus provided a 'template' which can be adapted according to class numbers and 'members'. Sample Text: Narrator: Good morning and welcome to our assembly on Whole cast: (Together) Superheroes! Narrator: So, for the benefit of our audience, what makes a superhero? Or maybe I should ask the question, what makes a hero super? Child 1: Super powers, of course! Child 2: You can’t do much without them! Child 3: Especially against those horrible baddies! Narrator: So. Let me get this straight. Heroes are always good? Child 4: Right. They fight for what is good in the world Child 5: Against all that is bad! Narrator: That must take a lot of courage! Child 6: That’s why they’re superheroes! Child 7: Brave! Child 8: Strong! Child 9: And determined! Child 10: It’s not always easy being a superhero! Narrator: (To cast) So. If you had the powers of a superhero, what would you do to make the world a better place? Child 11: I would take food to everyone who was hungry. Child 12: I would give shelter to everyone without a home. Child 13: I would hug everyone who feels unloved. Child 14: I would drive around in a Ferrari! Narrator: (Snorting) Oh really! And how is that going to improve the world? Child 14: Well, it would certainly improve mine!
Wind in the Willows Play or Set of Guided Reading Scripts
suesplayssuesplays

Wind in the Willows Play or Set of Guided Reading Scripts

(0)
Wind in the Willows Play or Set of Guided Reading Scripts This script is suitable for use as Guided Reading (Readers Theater) or for performance. Instead of being sold as two separate products, it is in effect 2 for the price of 1 – as the customer can use it for either purpose. Guided Reading: The 5 scenes can be used by 5 groups of 6 children i.e. a total of 30 altogether and simply read in the classroom, ‘around the table’. In this format, the music suggestions and ‘extra cast’ would obviously be dropped. Duration Around 25 to 30 minutes (about 5 minutes for each script) Play - for Performance Purposes: Use of the entire cast of 30: 6 speakers plus Woodland Creatures and Law Force, along with music suggestions. The length of performance can be reduced from 45 minutes plus to around 20 minutes by less use of music and the omission of one or more scenes. · Play/Performance: 30 minutes plus time for inclusion of music/routines – of around 15 minutes. Total: around 45 minutes – probably a bit longer. · Assembly or Class Play. The length of the play could be reduced to around 20 minutes by omitting one or more of the scenes. Sample Text: Badger: (Exploding) Toad learn his lesson? I don’t think so! Not with his Mole: (Interrupting hurriedly) More sandwiches, anyone? Badger: (To Mole) You’re way too soft on him, Mole. Toad: (Indignantly) Hello! I am still here you know! (Toad continues to fill his mouth with food) Badger: Taking advantage of your friends, as usual! (Badger helps himself to some sandwiches) Toad: Well, you don’t seem to be doing so badly, yourself! Good sandwiches? Badger: Indeed they are! You certainly know how to put together a fine picnic, Ratty! Ratty: Well, thank you. This ol’ brain of mine does have its uses! Mole: Such a clever animal! Badger: And just as well, some of the scrapes you lot got yourselves into! Gaoler: Oh, we know all about those! Stealing a car and driving it with no thought for the safety of others! Badger: That’s Toad, to a T! Toad: (Indignantly) Whatever do you mean? Badger: Just that, nine times of ten, you think of number one first! Toad: (Scratching head) Woah! Wait a minute! That’s way too many numbers! Badger: OK. Let me put it to you simply. (Pauses) You are one selfish, conceited creature! (Everyone gasps) Mole: Oh Badger! Must you? It’s such a lovely day and we were having such a fine time here by the river
Australia Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

Australia Assembly

(0)
Australian Assembly In celebration of Australia Day - joint narration by Pom and Swagman - an interesting mix of language and culture! tapping into this great country's history, geography and culture. Cast Size 24 but easily adjustable up or down (information can be split up between several more children taking cast size to 30) Duration Around 10 minutes reading time – this does not include music suggestions and ‘song performances’ Following is a review from publisher contact: A short play giving a lot of information about the land down under: some history, some wildlife, some music and some facts and figures to round it all out. This is another well-presented assembly from Sue Russell. There is the usual large cast size to accommodate a class group, with the many, small parts offset by having the two main characters who are onstage for the majority of the production. There are regular musical interludes to add interest, and any passages that contain recitation of facts, figures or histories are balanced by changing the speakers or having the characters react – I particularly liked the Swagman complaining there was too much dry information. To conclude: a bright, fast overview of a big, big country and a good introduction to a school topic. Sample Text Narrator: Good morning and welcome to our assembly on Australia. (Swagman strolls nonchalantly onto stage, looking around and ‘sizing' everyone up, before going over to Narrator, who is eyeing him cautiously) Swagman: G'day, mate! So what's all this about? Narrator: (Politely) Begging your pardon .. Swagman: (Interrupting) Ah! A Pom! Now how did I guess? Narrator: (Defensively) Something to do with me speaking the Queen's English? And as one of her loyal servants Swagman: (Interrupting) Don't tell me! You're gonna tell all these good folks about life ‘Down Under'? Well, allow me to help out a little. (Turning to Cast) What says you to us livening things up a little around here? (Whole cast nods enthusiastically, relaxing former ‘standing on ceremony' posture) (Swagman walks over to CD player and turns on ‘Down Under' - chorus, children singing and dancing, whilst Narrator looks on in horror) Music 2 - Down Under by Men at Work Narrator: (To Cast) Cut! (To Swagman, irately) Hey! Just what do you think you are doing? I'm in charge here! Swagman: No worries, mate! No need to chuck a wobbly! I was only trying to help. (Pointing to Cast) These guys and Sheilas just looked like they'd enjoy a little taste of the real Oz. Narrator: What? As delivered by a .. by a ... Swagman: Swagman, that's me! And here (taking off bag from his back) .. Meet Matilda!
Awe and Wonder Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

Awe and Wonder Assembly

(0)
Awe and Wonder Assembly This KS II class play is on awe and wonder – and there’s plenty of that about in the awesome world of nature! Scoring a ‘WOW!’ proves a bit of a challenge for this particular set of children – it seems to take a lot to impress the ‘awe-full-not’ teacher who is taking the assembly! Cast of 30 (easily adaptable up or down) Duration - around 15 minutes not including music suggestions This script is the first in a series of Awe and Wonder Assemblies – the second one being on Man Made Wonders – loosely based on the Seven Wonders of the World but probably with a lot more thrown in! There will be ‘parallel’ simpler scripts for Key Stage I children on this theme. Sample Text Narrator: So. Let us make sure this assembly is (pauses) awesome! What have you got for me? Child 12: Well, we thought we’d start with all the most awesome places in the world. Child 13: Aside from our school, of course! Narrator: (Smiling) Of course! Child 14: So, what about (Each child in turn holds up a picture of the place they are describing) Child 14: This great lump of rock! Narrator: Great lump of rock? What’s so awesome about that? Child 14: (Indignantly, to Child 10) What were you saying about adults? This lump of rock just happens to be Uluru – otherwise known as Ayer’s Rock, in Australia. Narrator: Well, it does have a pretty amazing colour. Child 14: Red sandstone! Formed six hundred million years ago! Narrator: Wow! (Whole cast cheers) Child 10: Wow! We got a wow! Narrator: Well, I’m not that hard to impress! Child 14: Difficult not to be impressed by the world’s biggest monolith – that’s a single rock, by the way! Narrator: Yes, yes. I knew that! Child 14: And that it’s some nine kilometres in circumference? Narrator: Hmm. Of course! I am a teacher, you know! Child 15: Well. What about this. The Grand Canyon! Narrator: More rocks? Child 15: (Indignantly) Yes but these rocks form one of the deepest gorges on Earth!
Lent Assembly or Class Play
suesplayssuesplays

Lent Assembly or Class Play

(0)
Lent Assembly or Class Play So, what are you giving up this Lent? As usual, our poor narrator has dubious task of coaxing sensible - make that, any - sort of response out of his reluctant cast! And as for even thinking about giving up chocolate - well, let's just say, the devil knows better! Although there is the usual high quotient of humour in this play, the subject matter is serious - and there is a clear explanation covering what Lent is all about. Duration: approximately 10 minutes reading time - longer with inclusion of mixture of beautiful and comical music. Written for cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down. Sample Text Child 5: Lent covers a period of forty weekdays – that’s approximately six weeks but not including Sundays. Child 6: During this time Christians traditionally devoted themselves to fasting, abstinence and penitence. Child 7: In other words, leading a less extravagant lifestyle and reflecting on how they could improve themselves. Child 8: You mean, recognising their faults and doing something about it? Child 7: That’s right. Child 9: Hmm. Fair enough. But going without food for forty days? I’m not sure about that one! Child 6: Nah! You remember I used the word ‘traditionally’? Well, Christians have become a lot more relaxed about fasting these days. Most people today just give up something like, well, chocolate for example! Child 10: (Exclaiming indignantly) Chocolate? Going without chocolate for forty days? Are you serious? Narrator: Oh come on! Surely you could survive without chocolate for forty days? Child 10: (Emphatically) I don’t think so! Narrator: Forty hours? Child 10: No! Narrator: Forty minutes! Child 10: (Hesitantly) Hmm, maybe Narrator: (Impatiently) Forty seconds? Child 10: (Triumphantly) Done! Narrator: So let’s talk about what this Lent is all about. (To Child 10) And then we might have some ideas about what to do with you! Why, for example, does Lent last for forty days? Child 11: This was the period of time Jesus spent in the wilderness, fasting and praying, before beginning his public ministry. Child 12: The wilderness? Sounds like a pretty scary place to be! Child 13: It was! Let’s see just how scary it was and how Jesus dealt with it!
History of the Olympics Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

History of the Olympics Assembly

(0)
Olympic History Class Play (one of collection of 10 scripts) This assembly, written by Sue Russell, covers the history of the Olympics, starting with its origins in Ancient Greece. All the host nations are presented in a fun coverage of both events and stars. Featuring the 18 countries that have so far hosted the Olympic Games, plus Brazil (2016 host), each gives a brief summary of their 'contribution' to the Games' history so far. Sample Text: 1. Simply the Best - Tina Turner (Children file in, waving flags triumphantly) Coubertin: Good morning and welcome to our class play on The History of the Olympics - when nations compete against each other, in the most sporting manner. (19 nations stand up with flags, cheering loudly) (Zeus plus 3 Ancient Greeks stride onto stage, folding their arms in front of them, taking up an aggressive stance) Coubertin: ‘Course, it wasn't always like that. Back in 776 BC it was only athletes from across Ancient Greece who competed. Zeus: In my honor! Sostratos: 5 days Leonidas: 7 events Kallipateira: (Scowling) And no women! Coubertin: Ah! The good old days! When men were men, and women were women! Kallipateira: I thought you were here to represent the Modern Olympics? Coubertin: Indeed I am. And you're about to see just how many changes took place over the years Zeus: Not necessarily for the better! (Looking around) I can't see any of this lot paying me homage! And what are those women doing, mingling with the men athletes? Coubertin: (In disgust) They're competing too! Other scripts available: 1. Brazil - Host Country to 2016 Olympics 2. Olympics PRIDE Assembly (PSHE 'team spirit' script) 3. Olympic Games 2016 Leavers Assembly 4. Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly - covering all 28 sports 5. Rio 2016 Olympic Games Assembly: history and events - combined script including Olympic Ode 6. Olympics Assembly for Key Stage 1 Rio 2016 7. Paralympics 2016 Assembly GUIDED READING SCRIPTS 1. A Complete History of the Olympic Games Guided Reading Scripts plus quizzes - set of 8 scripts, plus quizzes 2. Olympics PRIDE Guided Reading QUIZ Rio 2016 Olympic Games Quiz - 100 questions and answers! plus OLYMPIC ODE
International Day of Happiness Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

International Day of Happiness Assembly

(0)
International Day of Happiness Assembly A play to make you smile - I hope! Cast of 26 - easily adaptable up or down Duration - around 20 minutes depending on number of quotations, jokes and music suggestions included. Sample Text: Music 1 What a Wonderful World - Louis Armstrong (Enter 2 grumpy young girls, alias GYGs, and 2 grumpy young boys, alias GYBs, holding their hands over their heads) GYG1: What a din! GYB1: Somebody turn off that music! GYG2: Yeah! I’ve got a headache! GYB2: Me too! And it’s getting worse by the minute! (Enter Narrator) Narrator: (Coughing) Er excuse me! But hasn’t anybody told you what day it is today? GYG1: Not Monday, I hope. Worst day of the week! GYB1: Nah! Every day of the week’s bad … when you’re having to spend it at school! Narrator: Enough! Where did you lot crawl from? The wrong side of bed perhaps? (Falls about laughing) GYG2: (Sarcastically) Oh! I see we have a joker in our midst! GYB2: (Sarcastically) Oh! What fun! Narrator: Now, come on, you miserable lot! This really won’t do! (Pauses and looks towards rest of cast) Looks like we’re gonna have to tell them what day it is. Let’s hear it … Cast: (Shouting) International Day of Happiness! (Everyone holds up a smiley face) Narrator: And what do we do on International Day of Happiness? We Cast: (Shouting) Smile!
Anti Bullying Assembly or Class Play
suesplayssuesplays

Anti Bullying Assembly or Class Play

(0)
Anti-Bullying Assembly or Class Play Michael Jackson’s You Are Not Alone is used as its title and final song. Its Children’s Mental Health Week 3 - 9 February. So I am reducing a number of my ‘mental health related’ scripts to mark the occasion Some useful tips on looking out for others - and yourself. This class play identifies different types of bullying and suggests strategies for both prevention and dealing with the problem when it arises. It looks at the problem of bullying from 2 perspectives - that of the ‘bully’ and the ‘bullied’, examining why bullies behave as they do and what it feels like to be on the receiving end. The most important message is that we are all special, that we should like ourselves the way we are, and that if we ever find ourselves being bullied, we should get help/talk to someone - never bottle it up inside and ‘put up’ with it. I wrote this at a time when my own daughter (then 9) was being bullied. I learnt many lessons from the experience which I would like to pass onto others. This script comes in two versions - First one being longer at around 15 minutes (not including music suggestions); second one shorter at just under 10 minutes. I have identified the text that has been left in and taken out from versions I and II respectively. This gives you as a teacher the choice of what length play you wish to use. Another resource for use within the classroom is a script in the Bible Stories section of the website on David and Goliath - cast of 10 and with discussion pointers on bullying at the end. Sample Text: Child 19: You have to believe in yourself. And be your own best friend! (Child 21: Lollipop lady walks to centre of stage - lifts STOP sign each time it’s spoken) Narrator: What are you doing here? I can’t see any traffic? Lollipop Lady: No, but there are lots of things that need to stop, apart from cars. We’re here to tell you about the things we should stop doing! Child 1: STOP feeling everything that goes wrong is your fault! It isn’t! Child 2: STOP thinking you have to be perfect at everything! It’s not possible - you’re not superman! Child 3: STOP letting what you can’t do get in the way of what you can do! Child 4: STOP trying to be everybody’s friend. You can be liked by some of the people some of the time but not all of the people all of the time! Child 5: STOP jumping to conclusions. If someone doesn’t say Hi to you, don’t think ‘Hey! They’re ignoring me. They don’t like me anymore!’ They might not have seen you. Don’t assume the worst! Child 6: Stop labelling yourself. Feeling sad one day doesn’t make you a wimp! Child 7: Getting your sums wrong another day doesn’t make you a loser! Child 8: Having a spot on your nose one day doesn’t make you ugly! Child 9: Having an extra chocolate bar doesn’t make you wicked! Child 10: Stop telling yourself you should be this, and you shouldn’t be that.
Back to School Be Inspired Class Play or Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

Back to School Be Inspired Class Play or Assembly

(0)
Back to School Be Inspired Class Play or Assembly Since releasing this originally as a New Year Script I have ‘tweaked’ it to produce this script – a celebration of the beginning of the academic year. There are now three versions of the script available • Be Inspired New Year Assembly (the original script) • Be Inspired Assembly (for any time of the year) • Back to School Be Inspired Assembly (beginning of the school year) Cast Size 30 – but this number can easily be adapted up or down. Duration Around 20 minutes. The performance can be extended by the addition of more jokes and poetry. Sample Text Music I – I’m So Excited – Pointer Sisters (Whole cast ‘dances’ in, seating themselves along two rows of fifteen seats, facing the audience) Narrator: (To cast) Welcome back! Another school year! Are we all feeling inspired, that is the question? (Everyone cheers) Narrator: Now, that’s how I like to start an assembly! Lots of enthusiasm, zest, passion Child 1: Yes, yes, we get all that! But where are we going with all this good feeling? Narrator: Well, I’m kind of hoping its going to last (pauses) at least until …tomorrow? Child 2: (Shaking head) Ooh, I wouldn’t count on it. I mean, a lot can happen in a day! Narrator: I know it’s a lot to ask but, well, it’s good to have things to aspire to – however long for! As to how we’re going to achieve such a goal Child 3: (Interrupting) Oh, that’s simple. We just have to get inspired! Child 4: We’ve been doing some research and we’ve come up with some pretty inspirational stuff! Narrator: (Clapping hands) Excellent! Then, take it away! Child 5: So, it’s all about behaving in the right way every day of our lives. Narrator: (Aside to audience, incredulously) Every day? Seriously? That would have to be seen to be believed! Child 6: I know. It seems like a tall order. So we thought we’d start with just one month! Maybe this one! You have to start somewhere! Narrator: You mean, you have actually managed to find ‘inspiration’ for every day of the month, for each of the thirty days? Child 7: Correct. Starting with the Day One. Here comes the first of the many inspirational quotations we found. Narrator: Let’s hear it! Child 7: ‘Character is doing the right thing when nobody is looking’ – that was written by a J.C. Watts . Narrator: Fine words especially as I think most of us would want to receive praise or maybe reward. Child 7: Which is why not looking for praise or reward is all the more impressive. Child 8: (Grunting) I’ll try and remember that next time I do something amazing and nobody notices! Child 7: But you’ll know and that should be enough! Child 8: You’re right. It shouldn’t be about looking to others for praise. I’ll pat my own back from now on! Narrator: (Applauding) Very good! Next! Child 9: Day Two ‘A life making mistakes is not only more honourable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing at all’ – that’s from St. Patrick.
Brothers Grimm Readers Theater Fairy Tale Collection
suesplayssuesplays

Brothers Grimm Readers Theater Fairy Tale Collection

(0)
A Collection of Seven Fairy Tales, adapted to Reader’s Theater, originally written by Brothers Grimm, and given a wee twist by Sue Russell. *As explained below, these scripts are available separately – but together, this collection offers a 60% discount. Rumpelstiltskin Rapunzel Little Red Riding Hood Hansel and Gretel Cinderella Sleeping Beauty Snow White These plays each have a cast of 6. Reading time varies between 10 – 15/20 minutes. With synopsis, teaching input, discussion and suggestions for further activities. *These scripts are available as separate plays (without Readers Theater adaption i.e. with music suggestions and stage directions). Sample Text from Rumpelstilskin: Narrator: Good morning. And welcome to one of our favourite fairy tales Rumpelstiltskin: Rumpelstiltskin! That’s me! Narrator: A veritable fiend! Villain! Crook! Rumpelstiltskin: (Interrupting) Er, wait a minute! Are we talking about the same fairy tale? Narrator: Well, I think so. Weren’t you the horrible little Rumpelstiltskin: (Interrupting) Could you be just a tiny bit less offensive? I mean, ‘horrible’, ‘little’. Aren’t there any rules on political correctness here? Narrator: (Apologetically) Oh I’m sorry. You’re right. I’ll try not to follow this script I have here, quite so much Rumpelstiltskin: Here! Let me take a look at that! (Snorting) Pah! As I thought! Those Brothers Grimm! The way they described their characters! They’d never get away with it today! ‘Little man’ indeed! How would they like to be vertically challenged? Narrator: You know, I do sympathise with you. I think you have a right to feel the way you do! Rumpelstiltskin: Well, thank you Narrator: But that doesn’t completely excuse your behaviour. Rumpelstiltskin: (Exploding) My behaviour? What about that of the king and the girl’s own father?
Comic Relief Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

Comic Relief Assembly

(3)
This assembly, to raise awareness of Comic Relief and its fundraising activities, could be put on any day during the week leading up to Red Nose Day March 15th. Written for a class of 30 (numbers easily adaptable up or down), around 10 mins reading time - optional inclusion of music suggestions including this years's single One Way or Another - its very easy to do and full of awful jokes! Enjoy! And good luck with any fundraising activities - I am wearing a red tutu for a week (in and out of the zumba classes that I teach) - including a night at the opera!! Sue Russell
Our School's Got Talent Leavers' Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

Our School's Got Talent Leavers' Assembly

(0)
Our School's Got Talent Leavers' Assembly With a panel of judges drawn from teaching staff and school students, is there any possibility of justice - when it comes to judging the contestants?! Cast Size: 15 – 30 (For larger cast – up to 90 – see Production Notes) Duration: Around 20-30 minutes (to up to an hour – see Production Notes) Sample Text Music 1 - John Williams: Summon the Heroes (Everyone files in and takes up places) Head Teacher: Good morning and welcome to our Leavers Assembly for Year 6s. I have great pleasure in (Sound of ‘ranting’ from off stage, as Rant and Heck ‘explode’ onto stage) Rant: (Hysterically) Us? Today? Presenting a school version of Britain’s Got Talent? Heck: Why, yes! Oh heck! Didn’t I mention this to you? Rant: (Exploding) Didn’t I mention this to you? Well, of course you didn’t! Do you seriously think I would have agreed? Heck: (Spluttering) But… but… Rant: But… but… nothing! You’ve talked me into more than enough daft situations in the past – but not today! Heck: (Turning to Head Teacher) Oh heck! This probably isn’t what you were hoping for? Rant: And who’s this? Head Teacher: I’m the head teacher of …… Primary School. (Advances towards Rant with outstretched hand) So pleased to meet you! Allow me to introduce you, Rant (pointing to Rant) and you, Heck (pointing to Heck) to our audience assembled here today! You’re just in time to kick off our 2016 Leavers Assembly! Rant: (Incredulously) Kick off? Kick off, did you say? Well, if it’s Wayne Rooney … (pauses and mutters) …hmm, make that Lionel Messi - that you want to ‘kick off’ things today – you’re out of luck! Heck: No! No! He doesn’t need an international football star! He asked for us! Head Teacher: But if it’s too much trouble … Heck: Oh heck! Of course it’s not! Rant and Heck at your service! Other Leavers Assemblies by Sue Russell: • Olympics Leavers Assembly • School's Out Leavers' Assembly • It’s Good to be Me Leavers Assembly • Leavers Assembly for Year 6s
Second World War School Assembly or Class Play
suesplayssuesplays

Second World War School Assembly or Class Play

(1)
Second World War School Assembly or Class Play What was the Blitz? What was it like to be an evacuee? What did Morrisons have to do with bomb shelters? Why did Americans call the first 6 months the ‘phoney war’? (Also available, set of 5 guided reading play scripts, with quizzes - Background/Beginnings of War, The Course of the War, Evacuation, the Blitz and War-time Life/Rationing; plus a collection of First World War scripts - Remembrance Day Assembly, First World War Assembly and First World War Poets Assembly) SAMPLE TEXT Second World War or World War II Assembly Evacuee 5: I was lucky. Although I got separated from my brother, I was looked after by a very kind couple .. and didn’t want to go back to the grimy old city I’d left. Evacuee 1:I was so home sick. But my Mum said she could only visit once a month. Evacuee 2: I wanted to go home too. But it was for our own safety. (All walk off. Sound of bombs and air raid siren. Air Raid Warden rushes on). Warden: (grabbing child): Quick! It’s an air raid! If you’re not quick, you’re dead! Get yourself into a shelter now! Narrator: Yes, once those sirens went on, you really didn’t want to be out in the open. Best be (pointing at 2 adults and 2 children under table) snuggled together, indoors, under your Morrisons Shelter. Mum (brandishing Morrisons bag). Two for one, this week only! ________________________________________ TEACHING ‘COVERAGE’ 6. Unit 9 Second World War Assembly (i) Whose was to blame? (ii) Timeline: 1914 – 1945 - Origins in First World War - Chamberlain’s Appeasement Policy - Fates of different countries - Battle of Britain - Blitz - V.E. Day - Hiroshima/Nagasaki - V.J. Day (iii) Who was involved (location on map) (iv) Evacuees (v) Air Raids/Shelters (vi) Recreation (vii) Rationing (viii) Role of Army, RAF and Navy (ix) Women’s role (x) Anne Frank (xi) Remembrance Sunday (In Flanders Fields) (xii) Today’s World Situation (United Nations) (xiii) Lessons learnt. MUSIC 1. Land of Hope and Glory 2. Run rabbit, run rabbit, run run run 3. Dad's Army theme 4. Pack up your troubles 5. Imagine -John Lennon
School's Out Leavers' Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

School's Out Leavers' Assembly

(1)
School's Out Leavers' Assembly The cast size (30) can easily be adapted up (for a year group) or down, if necessary, to suit class size of less than 30. Duration: Reading time is only about 5 minutes. However, if all 12 songs are used, and say 2 minutes of each are performed, then this takes performance up to around 30 minutes. This is a rough figure depending heavily on how much of each song is used. What does it take to put a smile on those Year 6 faces? Maybe a large dose of great music and some equally great performances .... by the staff?! The lengths teachers will go to - or are we all really just frustrated rock stars underneath?! Easy to produce, great fun to do! Sample Text: Music 1 Yesterday – Beatles (Children file into places, singing as they come in and become seated; at the end of the song, all sit disconsolately, hanging heads in misery; group of teachers stand to one side, listening to their students) Teacher 1: What a beautiful song! Teacher 2: But why the long faces? Teacher 3: Why so sad? Teacher 4: What have you got to feel sad about? Teacher 5: This is your last day at school! Wouldn’t a better choice of music be …? Music 2 School’s Out – Alice Cooper (Teachers sing and perform really ‘over the top’ version of song; students look on in horror) Child 1: And they called us ‘sad’? Child 2: ‘Sad’ has to be the understatement of the year! Child 3: I’d say more like – ‘tragedy’! Teacher 6: (Beaming from ear to ear) Now you’re talking! Music 3 Tragedy – Steps or Bee Gees (Teachers again sing and perform totally ‘over the top’ version of the song; students increasingly alarmed) Child 4: Stop! Stop! Have you all taken leave of your senses? Teacher 7: Well, this is supposed to be a leavers’ assembly, isn’t it? (All teachers fall about laughing) Child 5: But guess what? It’s supposed to be our leavers’ assembly, not yours! Child 6: Yeah! You’ll all still be here this time next year! Child 7: Not like us! Child 8: We’re the ones leaving! Child 9: Not you! Teacher 8: So, why aren’t you celebrating? Other Leavers Assemblies by Sue Russell: It’s Good to be Me Leavers Assembly Leavers Assembly for Year 6s Our School’s Got Talent Leavers Assembly Olympics Leavers Assembly
Midsummer Night's Dream Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

Midsummer Night's Dream Assembly

(0)
Midsummer Night’s Dream Assembly This version of A Midsummer Night's Dream is directed, as a school assembly, by William Shakespeare's own son, Hamnet. Written for cast of 16-30, running time approx. 40 minutes, this play follows the original plot, but has some interesting twists along the way - to say nothing of how the 'play within a play' players are treated: a heroic Pyramus played by a 'large butt' Bottom; the lovely Thisby by a bushy bearded Flute; a wall by red-nosed sniffing Snout; Moonshine by 'starving' Starveling and not forgetting Snug's all important part - that of an asthmatic lion! And as if four confused lovers isn't enough to contend with on stage plus some very non-cooperative fairies - our poor director, Hamnet also has his playwright father to deal with! Also available: an alternative Midsummer Nights Dream - entitled Midsummer Nightmare, with Michael Jackson's Thriller taking us through the 'transitions'! There are three versions of this, with differing cast sizes and performance times. Sample Text Hamnet: Scene II Elsewhere in the wood (Group of very ‘out of tune/tone-deaf' fairies sing their idea of a lullaby to Titania, lying with her hands over her ears) Music 3 - All I Ever Do is Dream by the Everly Brothers Hamnet: Cut! Thank you! Can't you see the poor woman is trying to get to sleep? (Fairies exit, sulkily; Titania gives a sigh of relief and falls asleep) (Enter Oberon, sprinkling herb drops on sleeping Titania's eyelids) Oberon: There we go. Sleep tight, my dear. And wake when some vile thing is near. (Exit Oberon) (Enter Lysander and Hermia; Lysander struggling with a huge suitcase, Hermia limping along behind) Hermia: (Irritably) I told you we should have bought a map! Just look at my feet, all covered in blisters! Lysander: Ah quit complaining! At least you haven't been lugging this great case along behind you. So much for traveling light! Hermia: (Snatching suitcase) Well, let me relieve you of it! (Pulls out teddy bear and flings it at Lysander) There you go! Teddy can be your companion for the night! See you in the morning! (Hermia stalks off, with suitcase, to opposite side of stage. Proceeds to take out sleeping bag, pillow, and rugs - all of which make for a comfortable night's sleep; leaving Lysander to ‘cuddle up' with just the teddy. Both drift off to sleep)
FREE Sport Relief Assembly
suesplayssuesplays

FREE Sport Relief Assembly

(0)
FREE Sport Relief Assembly Every year I do something to raise money for Sport Relief - this generally in my capacity as a zumba instructor (guess what ‘sport’ is there in the script, representing Z on the sports list?!) This script is about as versatile as I can make it - any cast size, any duration, any number of songs/music suggestions. Good luck to everyone ‘doing their thing’ this year. My challenge is going to be ‘sitting still for one minute’ during each of my 15 zumba routines - a challenge beyond anything I have ever undertaken before! If you’ve ever been to a zumba class you’ll know what I mean! Simple message to accompany this script - ENJOY! Sample Text: Child 26: Volleyball Child 27: Weightlifting Child 28: Wrestling Child 29: Zumba! Narrator: (To Child 29) I beg your pardon? Child 29: Zumba! Would you like a demonstration? Music 2 – Zumba number/Latin American music (Child 29 ‘performs’) (Loud applause from cast and audience) Narrator: Magnificent! And I can see that dancing is just as energetic as all those other sports we’ve mentioned! Child 1: (Fanning him/herself) Phew! All that hot Latin American music! Child 2: But let’s not forget our winter sports! Child 3: We have only just had those fantastic Winter Olympics! Child 4: Who could forget Child 5: The skiing Child 6: Bobsleigh Child 7: Figure skating Child 8: Ice hockey Next big sporting event – THE WORLD CUP! Check out assemblies, guided reading scripts and quiz on this wonderful theme! All available off TES and