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Campaign - Make An Impact

Campaign - Make An Impact

The Campaign! Make an Impact model follows a simple three step plan. The process engages young people with inspiring campaigns from the past, provides examples of campaign strategies and supports active involvement in planning and delivering their own campaign. The Tolpuddle Martyrs, Clerkenwell Fund, Bryant and May Strike and Mumia Abu-Jamal cover nearly two hundred years of campaign history. They are linked because of the way in which ordinary people have gathered to a cause born out of social injustice. Determination, resolute purpose and courage to stand against what seems like overwhelming opposition mark these campaigns out. The resources, drawn from archive material about each event, provide starting points to help young people gain insights into historical campaigns and to be inspired to create a campaign of their own.
versym
Classroom Poster Set: Positive Skills

Classroom Poster Set: Positive Skills

Have you practised kindness today? Can you tell the difference between a fact and an opinion? Can you remember how to have a respectful conversation? Download our free Positive Skills Classroom Poster Set and brighten up your classroom with some positive day-to-day reminders for your students. You can download our free PDF posters below and choose to print your posters in paper sizes: A0, A1, A2, A3 and A4.
thinkkind
Peace and Conflict Scheme of Work

Peace and Conflict Scheme of Work

A scheme of work which covers the causes of war, how it is justified politically and religiously, nuclear war, pacifism, north korea, 9.11 and terrorism, with an opportunity for an creative and analytical assessment. I've tweaked, modified and re-vamped these resources to maximise engagement and learning for 2018.
DavidFew
Peace and Conflict Assessment

Peace and Conflict Assessment

This assessment aims to be a creative one, where students research a war and try to apply the just war theory, jihad, religious attitudes, the approach of a peace making organisation and their opinion to it. It is an attempt to have students using their critical thinking skills in a project that fosters analytic, creative and original thought. I know. I’m an optimist. Sarcasm aside, I think our students are getting smarter all the time: they are exposed to more information than any preceding generation and deserve the opportunity to show off and really apply themselves.
DavidFew
The United Nations

The United Nations

A lesson to explore the UN and what it does. This lesson aims to give students an understanding of the organisation and the means to question if it is a reasonable use of resources, or a waste of them. Class debates included, as usual, with extension activities, youtube videos, and plenty of varied activities to bolster engagement. A SEND worksheet also attached here. Learning Questions What is the United Nations? What are its aims? Do you think it’s a good organisation?
DavidFew
Nuclear War

Nuclear War

This lesson explores Nuclear war: the affects of nuclear weapons, if they can ever be justified, if there are any specific examples students know of, and how Christians might respond to the idea of nuclear war using the just war theory. SEND worksheet included, and a variety of extension activities (including how to make a peace crane) are included. As well as this, youtube videos and plenty of discussion activities, as well as an online ‘nuke map’ which explains how a nuke would affect the area you are, anywhere in the world. I know, right? An amazing resource. Learning Questions: What do Nuclear weapons do? Can Nuclear War ever be just? Are there any examples you know? How may Christians respond to Nuclear war?
DavidFew
9.11, Terrorism, War and Peace

9.11, Terrorism, War and Peace

This lesson has been a long one in the making. Having found resources from all over the web, edited my own video compiling footage from 9.11 and interviews from Geroge Bush and Osama Bin Laden, this lesson aims to give as an impartial view of 9.11 as possible. It includes neo-conservative explanations for 9.11, to Noam CHomsky esque critique of American Foreign Policy that Michael Moore would be proud of, and even allows al-Qaeda to explain their opinion. Obviously it makes explicit that targetting civilians is never, under any circumstances, acceptable, but tries to explain that 9.11 was a complicated event with historical, cultural, social and religious causes using a redacted and edited document which summarises complicated historical commentary into a digestible PDF. It even includes a brief mention of conspiracy theories for those more inquisitive students. Above all, it encourages critical thought and human compassion. A wide range of differentiated and extension activities here. Learning Questions: What was 9/11? How did it cause a war? Why did the the USA and al-Qaeda say it happened? Ext: Why do you think it happened? Independent, group and whole class activities included to bolster engagement and learning. There’s enough for at least 2 lessons here. But I’m selling it as one, because I’m nice like that.
DavidFew
Pacifism

Pacifism

A lesson to explore what pacifism is, how it has been used in the past and if it is a reasonable attitude to take to war. Looking particularly at the Quakers and their use of pacifism in anti-war protests and campaigning, the lesson aims to engage students in active critical thought and improve their awareness of how belief manifests in the real world. Learning Objectives: What is Pacifism? What is a conscientious objector? How did people treat conscientious objectors in WWI and II? Why might a religious person refuse to fight? Should we ALL be pacifists? It also includes links to youtube videos on conscience and examples of conscientious objectors for students to explore. It also includes, for more able students, examples of people who ‘broke the mold’ such as Dietrich Bonhoeffer.
DavidFew
Jihad: Muslim Attitudes to War

Jihad: Muslim Attitudes to War

A lesson that explores Muslim attitudes to war through Jihad. It explores the greater and lesser jihad, and gets students to collaboratively piece together what Jihad actually is whilst debunking the myth that it means ‘holy war’. Closer to ‘righteous struggle’ this lesson aims to draw comparison with the Just War Theory and help to see how in some ways it is more progressive than the JWT (avoids hurting plants and animals) and in others more religious (must be ordered by a religious leader). It also compares modern conflicts to Jihad, and the ways it has been misused. Learning Questions include: What are Muslim views to war? What is Jihad? How might Jihad be misinterpreted? Extension tasks included, as is a wordsearch starter for students to have a quick win at the beginning of the lesson to build learning engagement.
DavidFew
Christian opinions to War

Christian opinions to War

A lesson which explores Christian Attitudes to War. Learning Questions include: What are Christian Opinions to War? Why do Christians disagree with each other? EXT: How do you think social background affects peoples opinions? This powerpoint looks includes extension activities, independent learning activities and joint discussion. It covers citizenship, PHSE, SEAL, SMSC and Religious Studies syllabi (I love that plural) and I have found it to be a fairly engaging lesson for many students. It also includes a link to a youtube video animation to the parable of the lost son, and links this to the topic of war and peace for students to consider how religious teachings may be applied to modern day dilemmas. Not dilemmi. Sadly.
DavidFew
The Just War Theory

The Just War Theory

A lesson designed to explore the Just War Theory in a collaborative, group work activity that emphasizes team work. This leads on to a creative activity where students create a poster, poem or rap to exemplify the Just War Theory’s 7 aspects. Learning Questions include: What is the Just War Theory? Do I agree with it? Why? Differentiated learning outcomes included, which evaluate why Christians may or may not agree with the Just War Theory. All activities are clearly explained in the Powerpoint, and a variety of extension activities for more able students are included.
DavidFew
The Investigatory Powers Act

The Investigatory Powers Act

Perfect for a form discussion or a PHSE/Citizenship lesson, this resource examines the investigatory powers act and gives students the opportunity to debate their opinions on mass surveillance. It also summarises human rights, and is designed to help develop students skills of critical thought and debate. It includes a short youtube video and SMSC objectives. Learning Questions include: What is the investigatory powers act? Should the government be able to see all of our online data? SMSC objectives met are: To learn and discuss what is right and wrong and respect the law; investigate moral and ethical issues and offer reasoned views. To appreciate diverse viewpoints and resolve conflict.
DavidFew