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Columbus Day Learning Ideas for Investigation and Discussion

Columbus Day Learning Ideas for Investigation and Discussion

After watching the History Channel video about Christopher Columbus, have students watch the following video and discuss the similarities and differences in the two videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aF_unlvjccA Link to Columbus Day Resource: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2015/10/11/why-is-columbus-day-still-a-u-s-federal-holiday/?utm_term=.96db7274ccc2
Geoyce411
KS1 Dreamcatchers - Forest School

KS1 Dreamcatchers - Forest School

This was done in Forest School with a Year 2 class (they are half completed in the accompanying photo). We also read "The Crow's Tale" which is a Native legend with a nice moral and lovely pictures. Included are: Detailed Lesson Plan Examples (I printed these and stuck them on card to pass around in the forest) Dream Catcher History (to read to the class) Instructions on how to make a net (We didn't make proper nets with Year 2 but this could be used with older children)
CreativeClass13
The Adventures of Sajo and her Beaver People Reading Comprehension

The Adventures of Sajo and her Beaver People Reading Comprehension

In this Canadian classic, you will read about an Ojibwa brother and sister, 11-year old Sajo and 14-year-old Shapian, and their adorable pet beavers, Chilawee and Chikanee. One spring day, Sajo's father rescues two baby beavers from an otter attack and brings them home to their village. After one of the beavers must be traded for food, Sajo and Shapian set off to see if they can buy him back. Travelling by canoe and by train, they face various challenges on their trip to the City. They employ skills they have learned from their Ojibwa elders, and are also helped by a Missionary, American tourists, and an Irish policeman. Written in the style of old-fashioned classics like ‘Heidi’, this original tale by the renowned British-Canadian conservationist known as ‘Grey Owl’ is both informative and touching. Rich and reportedly accurate descriptions of the Eastern Canadian wilderness provide the backdrop to a story of caring people who triumph in their efforts to reunite two baby beavers with their family. Illustrations by the author provide added entertainment, as well as a glossary of Ojibwa terms. The book is divided into 23 chapters. Write your own definitions, answer reading comprehension questions, and research 22 topics (ranging from how otters and beavers hunt and eat, to how elevators and steamboats work). For each of these activities, you may go into great detail, or just scratch the surface – the material is adaptable to different students. Enjoy a trip into the past with a sincere story-teller and lovable characters! Research topics: Jacques Cartier, Ojibwa tea, beaver dams and lodges, how otters hunt, feeding human food to wildlife, Ojibwa/European trade, what beavers eat in the wild, what instinct is, the Hudson’s Bay Company, birch bark canoes, what ‘portage’ means, forest fires, steamboats, who are the Ojibwa, Native American spiritual beliefs, animals in zoos versus in the wild, travelling by train in Canada (in the past), how elevators work, the importance of saying thank you, what bannock is, autumn around the world, how dangerous wolves really are. Bonus! This title includes a set of Canadian Wilderness themed notebooking pages.
canadianwinter
iPad Card Sorts: American West

iPad Card Sorts: American West

These outstanding resources have been written and field tested in the classroom by experienced teachers using the Thinking Kit software for the iPad. These iPad card sorts cover the key topic of the American West and are designed to fun, engaging and used by the full spectrum of learners. To find out more, click on each resource for a full description of its aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and how to use it with your students. If you like these resources then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
GCSE American West Teaching Resources

GCSE American West Teaching Resources

This is your chance to buy all my outstanding American West resources bundled up for a massive saving. These resources are tried and tested. They are suitable for a wide range of abilities and will successfully engage your students. For more information, click on the resources.
Roy_Huggins
American West Teaching Resources

American West Teaching Resources

This is your chance to buy all my outstanding American West resources bundled up for a massive saving. These resources are tried and tested. They are suitable for a wide range of abilities and will successfully engage your students. For more information, click on the resources.
Roy_Huggins
Card Sort: How did Homesteaders survive on the Great Plains?

Card Sort: How did Homesteaders survive on the Great Plains?

This great activity is designed to help students studying how the Homesteaders survived on the Great Plains as part of a course on the American West. It can be used as either a revision, consolidation exercise or even as a plenary or starter. If you are looking for an accompany resource to cover this topic then please do check out my TES shop. The two page word document contains 14 problems with the solutions that the Homesteaders came up with mixed up. Students cut out the cards and match the problems and solutions under the two headings. Once they have peer reviewed or checked them during a class feedback session, students can then stick them into their books. Alternatively, you could create a class set that are kept in envelops and quickly matched and then put back as a quick starter or plenary. The aims and objectives for this activity are: Theme: How successful were the Homesteaders at settling on the Great Plains? Know: What problems did they have to overcome? Understand: How did the Homesteaders survive and build successful farms on the Great Plains? Evaluate: What impact did these solutions have on the Homesteaders, the environment and the Native Americans? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change, Continuity & Source Evaluation. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What problems did the Homesteaders have to overcome in order to survive? Explain: Did they try and solve these problems? Analyse: begin to make an overall judgement on how successful the Homesteaders were at settling on the Great Plains and at what cost? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Boomerang: Australian Science Activity

Boomerang: Australian Science Activity

As student studies medieval Australia and the Aborigines people they will love learning about and making their own boomerangs! This pack include: a close reading about boomerangs Reading comprehension questions copy-work how to make a paper boomerang link how to make a duct tape link
thesaylers
NAIDOC Aboriginal Editable Pack

NAIDOC Aboriginal Editable Pack

A collection of NAIOC Week editable templates to use in your child's portfolio/learning stories. Insert your own photos and write and edit your text. Print off and add to your portfolios.
edomain
Traditional products made by Aboriginal Australians

Traditional products made by Aboriginal Australians

This presentation contains images and brief descriptions of five traditional products made by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia. It can be used during a unit on indigenous cultures or on product design and technology in history. Suitable for all ages. The resource includes two filetypes: a MS Powerpoint file and a PDF file.
VanThom