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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-Trophic levels and biomass transfers-B18.8-9
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AQA new specification-Trophic levels and biomass transfers-B18.8-9

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Please note that I have merged the content of two lessons into one resource. Trophic levels and biomass transfers lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, past paper questions, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.4; 1, 2, 3 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 300-301 Students are required to know the following; 7.4.1 Students should be able to describe the differences between the trophic levels of organisms within an ecosystem. Trophic levels can be represented by numbers, starting at level 1 with plants and algae. Further trophic levels are numbered subsequently according to how far the organism is along the food chain. Level 1: Plants and algae make their own food and are called producers. Level 2: Herbivores eat plants/algae and are called primary consumers. Level 3: Carnivores that eat herbivores are called secondary consumers. Level 4: Carnivores that eat other carnivores are called tertiary consumers. Apex predators are carnivores with no predators. Decomposers break down dead plant and animal matter by secreting enzymes into the environment. Small soluble food molecules then diffuse into the microorganism. 7.4.2 Pyramids of biomass can be constructed to represent the relative amount of biomass in each level of a food chain. Trophic level 1 is at the bottom of the pyramid. Students should be able to construct accurate pyramids of biomass from appropriate data. 7.4.3 Students should be able to: • describe pyramids of biomass • explain how biomass is lost between the different trophic levels. Producers are mostly plants and algae which transfer about 1% of the incident energy from light for photosynthesis. Only approximately 10% of the biomass from each trophic level is transferred to the level above it. Losses of biomass are due to: • not all the ingested material is absorbed, some is egested as faeces • some absorbed material is lost as waste, such as carbon dioxide and water in respiration and water and urea in urine. Large amounts of glucose are used in respiration. Students should be able to calculate the efficiency of biomass transfers between trophic levels by percentages or fractions of mass. Students should be able to explain how this affects the number of organisms at each trophic level.
AQA new specification-Sustainable food production-B18.12
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AQA new specification-Sustainable food production-B18.12

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Sustainable food production lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, past paper questions, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.5; 3, 4 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 308-309 Students are required to know the following; Fish stocks in the oceans are declining. It is important to maintain fish stocks at a level where breeding continues or certain species may disappear altogether in some areas. Control of net size and the introduction of fishing quotas play important roles in conservation of fish stocks at a sustainable level. Students should be able to describe and explain some possible biotechnical and agricultural solutions, including genetic modification, to the demands of the growing human population. Modern biotechnology techniques enable large quantities of microorganisms to be cultured for food. The fungus Fusarium is useful for producing mycoprotein, a protein-rich food suitable for vegetarians. The fungus is grown on glucose syrup, in aerobic conditions, and the biomass is harvested and purified. A genetically modified bacterium produces human insulin. When harvested and purified this is used to treat people with diabetes. GM crops could provide more food or food with an improved nutritional value such as golden rice.
AQA new specification-Global-warming-B17.5
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AQA new specification-Global-warming-B17.5

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Global warming lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, homework, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded video’s and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.3.5 Relevant chapter: B17 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology for combined science textbook-Page 240-241 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe some of the biological consequences of global warming. Levels of carbon dioxide and methane in the atmosphere are increasing, and contribute to ‘global warming’.
Certificate of Achievement and Effort for Biology
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Certificate of Achievement and Effort for Biology

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Every year we have students that have gone above and beyond within our classes however, they aren’t always acknowledged in reward assemblies because of the large pool of students they are competing against. Most of the certificate templates I found online were either over complicated, childish or both. Students in secondary school wish to be treated as young adults hence, I have created a sophisticated certificate, one that students would be proud to take home. Reward the students in your biology classes for their achievement and effort using these certificates, download for free and edit away! If you like this certificate but don’t teach biology, edit away! P.S I have attached PDF and Word doc versions, I recommend you print your certificates as PDF.
Certificate of Achievement and Effort for Chemistry
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Certificate of Achievement and Effort for Chemistry

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Every year we have students that have gone above and beyond within our classes however, they aren’t always acknowledged in reward assemblies because of the large pool of students they are competing against. Most of the certificate templates I found online were either over complicated, childish or both. Students in secondary school wish to be treated as young adults hence, I have created a sophisticated certificate, one that students would be proud to take home. Reward the students in your chemistry classes for their achievement and effort using these certificates, download for free and edit away! If you like this certificate but don’t teach chemsitry, edit away! P.S I have attached PDF and Word doc versions, I recommend you print your certificates as PDF.
AQA new specification-mitosis and meiosis past paper questions-B2, B12/B13
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AQA new specification-mitosis and meiosis past paper questions-B2, B12/B13

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I have designed a mitosis and meiosis revision exam question pack, total marks /20. Contains a range of short and longer answer questions also requires students to interpret diagrams. This is a great piece of homework or mini class test, that can allow you to determine whether your students can distinguish between these two processes. I've attached the mark scheme separately as it's a great self/peer-assessed activity (reduce the marking load).
AQA new specification-Selective breeding-B13.3
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AQA new specification-Selective breeding-B13.3

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Selective breeding lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability (trilogy/combined) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.2.3 Relevant chapter: B13 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 182-183. Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain the impact of selective breeding of food plants and domesticated animals. Selective breeding (artificial selection) is the process by which humans breed plants and animals for particular genetic characteristics. Humans have been doing this for thousands of years since they first bred food crops from wild plants and domesticated animals. Selective breeding involves choosing parents with the desired characteristic from a mixed population. They are bred together. From the offspring those with the desired characteristic are bred together. This continues over many generations until all the offspring show the desired characteristic. The characteristic can be chosen for usefulness or appearance: • Disease resistance in food crops. • Animals which produce more meat or milk. • Domestic dogs with a gentle nature. • Large or unusual flowers. Selective breeding can lead to ‘inbreeding’ where some breeds are particularly prone to disease or inherited defects. WS 1.3, 1.4 Explain the benefits and risks of selective breeding given appropriate information and consider related ethical issues.
Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Professional practice
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Professional practice

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Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim D: Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work. How did i teach this? This assignment allows students to review the skills they attained in this unit. It also reiterates the importance of H&S as well as professional practice. Before setting the assignment i first taught three lessons covering the content in Pearson BTEC national-Applied science-Student book 1. Due to the complexity of this assignment i provided my students with a template which covered the P/M/D criteria (download the free template). This prevented students from going off on a tangent and also ensured they had mentioned the key skills for both assignment B and C. NB: Professional practice is the third lesson of the three. Worksheets attached and videos embedded for ease of use.
AQA new specification-Competition in animals-B16.4
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AQA new specification-Competition in animals-B16.4

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Competition in animals lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.1.1 Relevant chapter: B16 Adaptations, interdependence and competitions. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 264-265 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe: • different levels of organisation in an ecosystem from individual organisms to the whole ecosystem • the importance of interdependence and competition in a community. Students should be able to, when provided with appropriate information: • suggest the factors for which organisms are competing in a given habitat • suggest how organisms are adapted to the conditions in which they live. An ecosystem is the interaction of a community of living organisms (biotic) with the non-living (abiotic) parts of their environment. To survive and reproduce, organisms require a supply of materials from their surroundings and from the other living organisms there.
AQA new specification-Maintaining biodiversity-B17.6
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AQA new specification-Maintaining biodiversity-B17.6

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Maintaining biodiversity lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability trilogy class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, circus activity, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com ***Paper friendly tips: Print slides 16-23 as two slides per handout, you will only need two copies and can place these around your laboratory. Also print slide 11 approx 1 between 2-3. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.3.6 Relevant chapter: B17 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology combined science trilogy edition textbook-Page 242-243 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe both positive and negative human interactions in an ecosystem and explain their impact on biodiversity. Scientists and concerned citizens have put in place programmes to reduce the negative effects of humans on ecosystems and biodiversity. These include: • breeding programmes for endangered species • protection and regeneration of rare habitats • reintroduction of field margins and hedgerows in agricultural areas where farmers grow only one type of crop • reduction of deforestation and carbon dioxide emissions by some governments • recycling resources rather than dumping waste in landfill. WS 1.4, 1.5 Evaluate given information about methods that can be used to tackle problems caused by human impacts on the environment. Explain and evaluate the conflicting pressures on maintaining biodiversity given appropriate information.
AQA new specification-Global-climate-change-C13.4
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AQA new specification-Global-climate-change-C13.4

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Global climate change lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.2.3,4
AQA new specification-Atmospheric pollutants-C13.5
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AQA new specification-Atmospheric pollutants-C13.5

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Atmospheric pollutants lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.3.1, 2