Variables, Data types, Input and Selection

Variables, Data types, Input and Selection

This lesson is ideal for helping students use Flowgorithm. It introduces the concepts of variables and data types in Flowgorithm. This can be used at KS3 and KS4 as an introduction to programming. The students will create two flowcharts during this lesson: 1) A very simple one that uses inputs 2) A grade calculator that takes input from the user. Once students have completed this lesson they will be able to use Flowgorithm to: Get the user to enter an input. Use concatenation. Make decisions based on user input. This includes a paper based exercise for the students to use in class or it can be used as homework.
Rethink_Education
Compass Points and Grid References - Interactive Activity - KS1/KS2 Geometry

Compass Points and Grid References - Interactive Activity - KS1/KS2 Geometry

KS1/KS2 Geometry - Compass Points and Grid References - Interactive Activity This interactive uses co-ordinates, compass points and directional arrows. Pupils use the compass arrows to move the boat around the grid. This activity provides an opportunity to introduce simple grid references, asking pupils to move the boat to certain locations. Pupils can also be tasked with giving direction instructions using coordinates.
Tes_elements
Creating Fun Games using Scratch - Bundle

Creating Fun Games using Scratch - Bundle

This photocopiable resource has been produced to provide KS2 and KS3 students with exciting and engaging opportunities to learn coding concepts using Scratch in a series of 4 fun standalone projects. The projects are: Game 1 - Burst that Balloon- Students create a balloon game. They must burst the balloons to score points. Game 2 – Pong - Students create the traditional one player game of Pong. Game 3 – Frog Fun - The frog has to catch the butterflies to score points and must avoid the ladybirds. Game 4 - Catch the Birdy - The Scratch cat is being chased by an angry dog. The cat must catch the birds that are flying by whilst at the same time avoid the dog. Each project takes about an hour to complete and all of them include a series of challenges.
edulitolearn
Creating Fun Games using Scratch -Catch the Birdy

Creating Fun Games using Scratch -Catch the Birdy

This resource has been produced to teach KS2/KS3 students about programming concepts by creating fun games using the visual programming language Scratch. The activities and challenges have been designed to provide a stimulating, engaging and effective way of improving students knowledge of the core programming concepts. In this game students create a chase game where you must catch the birdy but avoid the dog. Students learn about sequences, selection using IF, variables and the use of iteration (Conditional and Count Controlled loops).
edulitolearn
Creating Fun Games using Scratch - Frog Fun

Creating Fun Games using Scratch - Frog Fun

This resource has been produced to teach KS2/KS3 students about programming concepts by creating fun games using the visual programming language Scratch. The activities and challenges have been designed to provide a stimulating, engaging and effective way of improving students knowledge of the core programming concepts. In this game students program a frog to catch insects, but some insects are poisonous and must be avoided. Students learn about sequences, selection using IF, variables and the use of iteration (loops).
edulitolearn
Creating Fun Games using Scratch -Pong

Creating Fun Games using Scratch -Pong

This resource has been produced to teach KS2/KS3 students about programming concepts by creating fun games using the visual programming language Scratch. The activities and challenges have been designed to provide a stimulating, engaging and effective way of improving students knowledge of the core programming concepts. In this game students create a one player version of the game Pong. Students learn about sequences, selection using IF, variables and the use of iteration (loops).
edulitolearn
Creating Fun Games using Scratch - Burst that Balloon

Creating Fun Games using Scratch - Burst that Balloon

This resource has been produced to teach KS2/KS3 students about programming concepts by creating fun games using the visual programming language Scratch. The activities and challenges have been designed to provide a stimulating, engaging and effective way of improving students knowledge of the core programming concepts. In this game students create a balloon sprite and then learn how to move it around the stage. When they click on the balloon it bursts and this increases their score. Students learn about sequences of code, variables and the use of iteration (loops).
edulitolearn
Crumble Resources: Lighthouse Project

Crumble Resources: Lighthouse Project

Contains the resources needed to produce a Crumble Controlled lighthouse. It’s a great cross-curricular lesson, with the potential for a lot of research into lighthouse, and how the pattern of lights is unique. LO: To use an input to control an output Success criteria: All children will create a light sequence for a lighthouse; Mastery: children will use a toggle switch to control when the light shines; Greater depth: children will use an LDR to sense when the lighthouse should become active. For this project you will need: One Crumble with USB lead; A computer with the Crumble software installed; One battery pack with batteries (not rechargeable); One Sparkle; One toggle switch or one light-dependent resistor; Seven croc-leads. For the lighthouse build you will need: Card; A clear plastic cup; Tin foil; Scissors/craft knife; Glue/tape; Coloured pens/pencils or paint. Links to the curriculum (KS2): Computing: Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; Solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts; Use sequence, selection and repetition in programs; work with various forms of input and output. Design and technology (if making own models): Apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products. Potential geography link: Use fieldwork to present the human features in the local area using a range of methods, including digital technologies.
RedfernElectronics
Crumble Resources: Countdown Clock

Crumble Resources: Countdown Clock

Contains the resources needed to make a countdown clock, using the Crumble Controller and a servo. It’s a great lesson for understanding how a servo works, and using an input to control an output. It also brings cross-curricular links with maths and possibly D&T. LO: To use sequence, selection and repetition Success criteria: All children will create a visual 30 second timer Mastery: children will control their timer using a push-to-make switch Greater depth: children will add in buzzer beeps, which increase in frequency near the end of the timer Difficulty: Intermediate For this project you will need: One Crumble with USB lead; A computer with the Crumble software installed; One battery pack with batteries (not rechargeable); One servo (and Crumbliser); One buzzer; One push-to-make switch; Nine croc-leads. To make the clock you will need: Card and pens or Printed template; Scissors; Tape; Glue; Two split-pins/paper fasteners. Links to the curriculum (KS2): Computing: Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; Solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts; Use sequence and repetition in programs; work with various forms of input and output. Design and technology: Apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products. Maths: Know the number of seconds in a minute (year 3); Recognise angles as a property of a shape or a description of a turn (year 3); Draw given angles and measure them in degrees (if drawing a clock face)(year 5); To see step-by-step instructions, visit here
RedfernElectronics
Crumble Resources: Police Lights Project

Crumble Resources: Police Lights Project

The resources needed to make a Police car using the Crumble Controller. This makes a nice starting project, as it is simple to achieve. By adding motors and wheels, you could really go to town making your own vehicle - perfect for a KS2 D&T project. Difficulty Rating: Beginner For this project you will need: One Crumble with USB lead; A computer with the Crumble software installed; One battery pack with batteries (not rechargeable); Two sparkles; Eight croc-leads. If making the police car model, you will also need: Printed template; Scissors; Coloured pens/pencils; Glue; Masking tape. Links to the curriculum (KS2): Computing: Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; Solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts; Use sequence and repetition in programs; work with various forms of input and output. Design and Technology (if making own models): Apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products. To see step-by-step instructions, visit here
RedfernElectronics
KS3 Computing Scratch Project - All About Me (2 hours)- Teacher Presentation & Tools

KS3 Computing Scratch Project - All About Me (2 hours)- Teacher Presentation & Tools

The second of six KS3 practical programming tasks which guide students through the basic concepts of programming whilst introducing design through decomposition and abstraction, and developing their evaluation skills. In this teacher presentation, students return to the basic concepts of inputs, outputs, whilst adding selective statements and investigating how selection changes the outputs of a program. To support the practical aspects of this 2 hour task, students continue to spend specific time on investigating how to break down a seemingly simple program into a set of detailed steps. Used in combination with Student Design Notebook (inlcuded)
hbillinghurst
KS3 Computing Scratch Project - My Band (2 hours)- Teacher Presentation & Tools

KS3 Computing Scratch Project - My Band (2 hours)- Teacher Presentation & Tools

The first of six KS3 practical programming tasks which guide students through the basic concepts of programming whilst introducing design through decomposition and abstraction, and developing their evaluation skills over 2 hours of lesson time. In this teacher presentation, students are introduced to the basic concepts of inputs, outputs, and loops whilst spending specific time on investigating how to break down a seemingly simple program into a set of detailed steps. Used in combination with Student Design Notebook (included)
hbillinghurst
Makey Makey Combination Cards

Makey Makey Combination Cards

Some quick Makey Makey combo cards I’d use to generate ideas for pupils who need support or more structure. Used with the Makey Makey inventors kit. Pick one card from each part: a project, material type and an action (see the preview). Pupils can cut out and combine the cards to rapidly generate and evaluate ideas. I’ve used in secondary (secondary computing NQT), but I’ve used similar in a primary code club. Provided in PDF and Word so you can edit if needed.
frasermckay
App Inventor Alluring Audio - (Lesson 4)

App Inventor Alluring Audio - (Lesson 4)

This is the forth lesson in the ‘App Inventor’ scheme of work. This lesson combines practical and theory to teach the “representing sound” concepts covered in the Computer Science 9-1 GCSE specifications, (including; sample rate, sample resolution & calculating audio file size.) All lessons within the scheme are targetted at KS3/KS4. Each slide includes detailed notes to support teacher understanding and have been based on a lesson plan structure. There is no prior knowledge required from the class teacher as the guides provided are step-by-step & all code is catered for in the documentation provided. For this lesson a video tutorial is available to support learners with the design of their app. The lesson includes a minimum 45 minute assessment (electronic & paper based included) with mark scheme both of which are custom made, this will truly test learner’s understanding. Using the ‘App Inventor’ emulator or a mobile device with the 'MIT App Inventor app’ installed will allow learners to practically use the apps they build. The app can be downloaded freely from the ‘Google Play’ store.
beef_keefe
App Inventor FortuneT --- (Lesson 3)

App Inventor FortuneT --- (Lesson 3)

This is the third lesson in the ‘App Inventor’ scheme of work. This lesson introduces programming concepts including; Variables, data structures & the randomise method in a completely interactive manner. All lessons within the scheme are targetted at KS3/KS4 and appropriately mapped to elements of the Computer Science 9-1 GCSE. Each slide includes detailed notes to support teacher understanding and have been based on a lesson plan structure. There is no prior knowledge required from the class teacher as the guides provided are step-by-step & all code is catered for in the documentation provided. Using the ‘App Inventor’ emulator or a mobile device with the 'MIT App Inventor app’ installed will allow learners to practically use the apps they build. The app can be downloaded freely from the ‘Google Play’ store.
beef_keefe
Greenfoot crab tutorial

Greenfoot crab tutorial

This resource takes your students through the crab tutorial step by step and also gives them some challenges along the way. A perfect resource to introduce Greenfoot with. I used this with my students for the WJEC/Eduqas GCSE specification
livef
Programming Using Kodu

Programming Using Kodu

Students will understand the term ‘programming’ whilst using Kodu. Students will use Kodu to create a world and program Kodu to move. Students will then design and create their own game whilst providing evidence. Lesson One-Six Kodu Lesson Seven Revision Lesson Eight Assessment Lesson Nine Feedback and Improvements This unit has a lesson presentation for every lesson that includes a starter activity, main activity and plenary. Resources also include homework, worksheets, helpsheets and an overall assessment sheet that can be used for self, peer and teacher assessment. A full Scheme of Work is also provided. This unit of work is suitable from Years 6-8 depending on ability.
samoliver368
App Inventor Drawing Tools -- (Lesson 2)

App Inventor Drawing Tools -- (Lesson 2)

This is the second lesson in the ‘App Inventor’ scheme of work. This lesson introduces learners to being able to apply drawing tools in ‘App Inventor.’ Learners will code a solution to a given problem and will apply computational thinking skills. All lessons within the scheme are targetted at KS3/KS4 and appropriately mapped to elements of the Computer Science 9-1 GCSE. Each slide includes detailed notes to support teacher understanding and have been based on a lesson plan structure. There is no prior knowledge required from the class teacher. Using the ‘App Inventor’ emulator or a mobile device with the 'MIT App Inventor app ’ installed will allow learners to practically use the apps they build. The app can be downloaded freely from the ‘Google Play’ store.
beef_keefe
Introduction To App Inventor ---  (Lesson 1)

Introduction To App Inventor --- (Lesson 1)

This is the first lesson in the ‘App Inventor’ scheme of work. This lesson is aimed at giving learners an introduction to app development and within this lesson learners will have scope to build their first app. All lessons within the scheme are targetted at KS3/KS4 and appropriately mapped to elements of the Computer Science 9-1 GCSE. Each slide includes detailed notes to support teacher understanding and have been based on a lesson plan structure. There is no prior knowledge required from the class teacher. Using the ‘App Inventor’ emulator or a mobile device with the 'MIT App Inventor app ’ installed will allow learners to practically use the apps they build. The app can be downloaded freely from the ‘Google Play’ store.
beef_keefe
End of year Computing Summer Quiz 2018

End of year Computing Summer Quiz 2018

NEW COMPUTER SCIENCE QUIZ FOR THE END OF YEAR / SUMMER TERM 2018! A fun whole class quiz, ideally suited to keep pupils engaged and settled for the final lesson of the summer term. Suitable for year 7 to year 11. The quiz includes computer science elements as well as other fun summer related questions getting them into the summer holiday spirit. Guaranteed to make the final lesson fun before they break up for summer. Print out the answer sheets (enough for 1 per team) and then run through the quiz on the whiteboard. After each section the answers are provided allowing the quiz to easily be cut shorter if you wish. Suitable for GCSE Computer Science classes and KS3 Computing and ICT classes.
nwilkin
Microbit- a lazy set of 6 problem-solving lessons

Microbit- a lazy set of 6 problem-solving lessons

This is a great set of lessons for microbit that require NO prep on the teacher, entirely student led, guaranteed to create engagement. Perfect for year 7 but could be extended to year 8 and 9 as well. my students love it! it gives opportunity for discussion,planning, pseudocode,flowchrt, testing. each lesson has a real life problem that the students need to solve using the microbit I used the microbit “let’s create” block editor online software (which will give simulation of the real microbit on days when i am too lazy to even get the microbits off the shelf!),though my higher students are asked to complete it in Python once they have solved the problem successfully in the block editor.
annetortue
Scratch UltraBundle - 3 Units

Scratch UltraBundle - 3 Units

This bundle includes the Scratch beginner’s bundle, intermediate bundle and expert bundle all in one. I have used this for Years 5-7, using one unit each year as they move up the school. This could be used for other year groups as they encounter and improve with Scratch. Each unit should take 6-8 lessons, which is why I have spread them out over three year groups. In total there are 18 different resources bundled together here.
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Scratch Expert Bundle

KS2 / KS3 Scratch Expert Bundle

This bundle is the third in a series of Scratch units, intended for KS3 or possibly high ability KS2 students. The first two lessons include looking at flowcharts and creating an algorithm using a flowchart, which then feeds into creating the game in Scratch. The third lesson involves creating a slug trail maze, which draws on what they might have done previously in creating mazes and drawing with the pen tool. The fourth lesson is more in depth with a look at variables and iteration, creating an endless scrolling flying game. The fifth lesson involves debugging and coding a Space Invaders-style game using starter code. This task includes subroutines and is the hardest of the unit. The unit ends with a project (3+ lessons) where the students create their own game based on some loose instructions. They then write about how they have made their game using a template in Powerpoint.
MrHawes8
KS3 Scratch Game Project

KS3 Scratch Game Project

This resource is a set of instructions for KS3 students to create their own game. Ideally they will be at or near to finishing with Scratch before moving on to more complex programming languages. This is intended for the end of my KS3 Scratch Unit of work. Included is the Word document which details what they will need to include in their game (and what they might want to include), as well as an example game evaluation written in Powerpoint to make it easy for them to write about. There is also a skeleton evaluation which describes what they need to include in their evaluation. As the students can create their own game and need to write about how they have made it, this is likely to take a minimum of three lessons.
MrHawes8
KS3 Scratch Space Intruders game tutorial

KS3 Scratch Space Intruders game tutorial

This resource includes a finished Space Invaders-style game made with Scratch, as well as a starter code version of the game and a tutorial/help sheet. This is intended for one lesson to help teach variables and subroutines. The finished version can be shown as a demonstration of how the game should work, then the students can be shown the starter code. This version does not work, and they will need to complete the tasks on the tutorial to get it working correctly. The tutorial includes screenshots of code snippets and explanations of how any why they work to get the game functioning correctly.
MrHawes8
KS3 Endless scrolling game scratch tutorial

KS3 Endless scrolling game scratch tutorial

This resource is a tutorial to help students understand how variables and iteration are used to create a simple scrolling game. The tutorial includes screenshots of code snippets and instructions on how and why the code works to create the finished version of the game. The resource also includes the finished version of the game, which I use to demonstrate the game before showing the first few steps in making it. The tutorial can be used as a help sheet for students who push on further with the game before the rest of the class, or who might need help in getting their game to work as intended.
MrHawes8
KS2/KS3 slug trail maze tutorial

KS2/KS3 slug trail maze tutorial

In this resource is a working version of a ‘slug trail’ maze game, and a Word document tutorial to go with it. The tutorial can be given to students as a help sheet once they have been given an introductory demonstration, or if they are pushing on further than the rest of the class. The tutorial help sheet includes screenshots of code and explains how and why this code is used to create the finished version of the game.
MrHawes8
KS3 Scratch Flowcharts 2-lesson mini project

KS3 Scratch Flowcharts 2-lesson mini project

Included in this resource is a Powerpoint which is helpful in recapping flowcharts and then leads into a programming task involving a number guessing game. The students should be aiming to make a flowchart based on the first two tasks in the project, which will help them move on to programming them in Scratch in the second lesson. There is a card sort which involves writing the instructions onto blank paper symbols to form the flowchart, and examples of each task as a flowchart and scratch game. This has been used with Year 7 following two previous units using Scratch, as a warm up for programming as well as a reminder of flowcharts and their usefulness in planning programs.
MrHawes8
Scratch [Modelling and Simulation]

Scratch [Modelling and Simulation]

My activity booklet for building a model of a the solar system in Scratch. Students complete some Internet research first (gives us a chance to look into searching techniques, fake news and logging data/information) We then spend a few lessons coding the solution to the model, getting the sun to rotate around the sun. Adding the moon to rotate around earth and then adding the other planets. This is a really fun activity that I use as a transition from talking about Internet safety, Internet skills to programing in Scratch, I have also included an example solution file, so you can learn how to code this particular solution, as well as demonstrate a working model the students.
PaperAirplane
Scratch Programming Fractal Tree Activity

Scratch Programming Fractal Tree Activity

One of the areas of the national curriculum that we should be introducing students to is RECURSION. This is an excellent activity to introduce that concept in a visual way with a simple task to create a fractal tree in Scratch programming. This activity I had a learning observation on. I had my students work in small groups to try and complete the main activity together. When they finished this, they were to research other fractal activities on-line and see what they could create. Students really enjoyed this activity at the end of the Scratch topic to introduce a very complex topic that is not part of GCSE, but that appears again at IB level and A level. I expect students to learn that recursion is a complex rule that simplifies programs, but is very difficult to understand and it is a function that uses itself to solve a problem.
PaperAirplane
Scratch Programming Test 2 + Answers

Scratch Programming Test 2 + Answers

End of section test (I use with Y8 students) to assess their comprehension of coding using Scratch (I have uploaded my unit of work which goes with this. This is used a long with the assessment activity uploaded in the other unit of work, to check student progress. This is a problem solving assessment which tests students abilities to read and interpret code, as well as explain it. Checks their logical and computational thinking skills and ability to spot and correct errors.
PaperAirplane
Scratch Programming Y7/8/9 Activities Booklet

Scratch Programming Y7/8/9 Activities Booklet

Depending on the skills of your class, this is an activity book which can be used to introduce a lot of the Computing/Computer Science Curriculum in a creative way. 8 separate activities with links to completed/example projects and instruction videos. Lesson 1: Mad Libs This provides a nice opportunity to cross some Literacy boxes and cross curricular activities. It also ensures that students are being introduced to arrays and lists. This may seem complex at this point, but the activity really allows students to get the ideas behind it. One lesson to introduce and complete, scope for taking it further. We branched out for another lesson and students designed and implemented an excuse generator. Lesson 2: Digital Binary Perfect lesson to introduce Logical and Computational Thinking and go into as much or as little depth in Binary as you like. Again, this lesson took us about two lessons, as I made some follow up activities for the alarm clock and logic which are mentioned in the task themselves. Lesson 3: Randomly Random Introducing random functionality and variables to create a random character based on different sprites and costumes. We spent a few more lessons on this, as we advanced onto some follow up activities which are mentioned in the activities. Lesson 4: Keepy Uppy This is the first games based task that students make. It is based off the similar Atari game. All explained within file. I have also included the video lessons that I use to support my weaker students who are struggling in this. again, great scope to go above and beyond what is here, limited only by time and students abilities. Lesson 5: Harry Potter Challenge I complete this activity in pairs for a change on some of the other tasks. Students work together taking turns to be coder and tester, swapping often. They really love this and we spent a while designing other parts for our game and having a class competition on them Lesson 6: Group Project Another group based learning activity. Swapping groups (not necessary) we look at some of the pseudocode and flowcharts (included for several tasks here) I have included some links to some excellent exemplar student work here. Again, introducing simulation to students and with scope to go beyond what is included in the activities. Lesson 7: Practical Assessment As part of moving to life beyond levels (I have left levelling info in this, but included the word file and you are welcome to edit) This I do over one lesson - students struggle to finish it, so it really does differentiated the different skill levels Bonus Activity: Recursion I have included a Fractal Tree Activity that I use to teach about recursion. Fun end of term challenge.
PaperAirplane