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10 x Famous Cartoon Characters Wordsearches Starter Settler Activity Homework Cover Wordsearch

10 x Famous Cartoon Characters Wordsearches Starter Settler Activity Homework Cover Wordsearch

10 x Wordsearches on the theme of ‘Famous Cartoon Characters’. Wordsearches are: Aladdin Angry Birds Frozen Looney Tunes Ninja Turtles Pinocchio Snow White Wacky Races Wombles Woody Woodpecker Powerpoint so can be used on the board or printed as a worksheet. Includes space for students to explain the keywords and suggested extension activities. Can take 10 minutes or an hour, depending on which activities the students complete. Ideal for the start of a lesson, a quick filler, a homework, part of a cover lesson or as a plenary on the board with a whiteboard pen. The idea behind these is to get students to become more literate and think independently about the words that could be used to describe the topic being taught. The repetition of the word over and over as they look for the word is useful in remembering the terms. Often the students will pick up on things that you would not normally expect!
mikedean
Theory of Knowledge - starter activity

Theory of Knowledge - starter activity

‘To infinity and beyond’ Words from the cartoon philosopher spaceman, Buzz Lightyear. Is the 1960s space race narrative still relevant to popular culture in the 21st century, with the International Space Station demonstrating collaboration in action across world powers?
hayley_winton
Plurals in Hungarian - A többesszám

Plurals in Hungarian - A többesszám

Plural form is a complicated thing to learn in Hungarian. Let me show what I mean. Plurals are created with suffixing the letter k to both nouns and adjectives. It seems simple given you have a (good) word which ends properly to a vowel (and to a proper vowel… but to that later). Lets see an example. The world futó means runner in English. So futók means runners. What could be simpler, right? No. Most words usually end with a consonant in Hungarian, so we have to insert an extra vowel between the word and the letter k. Rules governing what vowel is where the issue lies. Given the adjective vörös (red). The extra vowel here can be e if the color red was used literally or ö if it was used symbolically. For example multiple red objects would be vörösek, but a team playing in red in football would be called the vörösök. … stay tuned :)
PeterZentai