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150 Python Challenges

150 Python Challenges

A single location to download all of our Python challenges (previously sold as separate downloads). Includes a single 149 page book outlining the challenges giving helpful instructions including how to install Python and SQLite3 as well as including sample code to help you and your classes complete all of the challenges. Screenshots of each solution included along with the original Python file so you can demonstrate the working solution to your class and talk through the code with them. Includes ready-to-use challenges to practice with and 5 larger chunky challenges to help pupils prepare for their NEA coursework and ideal to be used for the NEA resource bank. Suitable for KS3, GCSE and A Level Computer Science pupils. Covers: • Inputting and displaying data • Strings • Maths • If statements • For and while loops • Random • Turtle • Tuples • Lists • Directories • Numerical Arrays • 2D lists and directories • Reading from and writing to an external text file • Reading from and writing to an external .CSV file • Functions • TKinter • SQLite3 A complete, ready to use resource that will prove invaluable to your pupils to help them learn Python as a reference guide as they progress with their programming. For more high-quality resource visit www.nicholawilkin.com

By nwilkin

Python Harry Potter Sorting Hat Lesson

Python Harry Potter Sorting Hat Lesson

Overview: In this lesson, students will create a Harry Potter style sorting hat using lists in Python. Learning Objectives: - Understand and use sequence in an algorithm - Understand and use iteration in an algorithm (FOR and WHILE loops) - Understand and use selection in an algorithm (IF, Else and Else if)​

By Wolves_CLC

Python Magic 8 Ball Lesson

Python Magic 8 Ball Lesson

Overview: In this introduction to programming using Python, students will create a “Magic 8-Ball” game. The game will work by asking the user to input a yes / no style question and will respond with one of it’s classic predictions such as: “Yes”, “Most likely” and “Outlook not so good”. Learning Objectives: - Understand and use sequence in an algorithm - Understand and use selection in an algorithm (IF, Else and Else if) - Understand and data structures in an algorithm (for example, Lists, Tables or Arrays) - Understand the importance of comments in code

By Wolves_CLC

How to make a Mad Libs game in Python

How to make a Mad Libs game in Python

Overview: In this lesson, students will code a “Mad Lib” game in Python. The game will work by prompting the user to enter some words (e.g. person’s name, noun, adjective, place, object etc.) and substitute these with blanks in a story. Learning Objectives: - Understand and use sequence in an algorithm - Understand and use iteration in an algorithm (FOR and WHILE loops) - Understand and use data structures in an algorithm (for example, Lists, Tables or Arrays)

By Wolves_CLC

Python Shakespearean Insult Generator

Python Shakespearean Insult Generator

Overview: In this lesson, students will learn how to create a 'Shakespearean Insult Generator' using Python Learning Objectives: • Understand and use sequence in an algorithm • Understand and use iteration in an algorithm (FOR and WHILE loops) • Understand and use selection in an algorithm (IF, Else and Else if) • Understand and use data structures in an algorithm (for example, Lists, Tables or Arrays)

By Wolves_CLC

Computational Thinking

Computational Thinking

Purchase my three comprehensive guides to computational thinking within one bargain package! Includes: Computational thinking for KS3 Computational thinking for KS4 Problem Solving for KS3

By RobbotResources

Object Orientation - OCR - Alevel - Python - Package

Object Orientation - OCR - Alevel - Python - Package

This package includes 3 powerpoints that introduce object orientation to students. On top of the object orientation powerpoints, there are worksheets that help students build on the skills that they have learnt. The first activity sheet shows how to set up a class in python and how to call on it. The second shows how to pass parameters into your class using constructors. There is theory supported in the powerpoint. The third lesson shows how to design a class and is a good introduction to class diagrams.

By r_chambers

How do you teach coding?

How do you teach coding?

How do you teach coding? Who is this for? For primary teachers who teach programming - for both non-specialist and specialist computing teachers. What is it? This is a 15-minute research questionnaire by researchers at Queen Mary University of London. Why might you do this? Just doing the questionnaire, will help you think about your own planning and how you teach coding. If you are interested in taking part in the research to improve how we teach programming, pop your email at the end of the survey. Please help us find out more about how we teach programming so we can improve what how we teach our primary pupils how to code! Here is the research questionnaire. https://goo.gl/forms/4nWlR1kQ2r8mnFud2

By jlisaw8

Computational thinking starters and plenaries

Computational thinking starters and plenaries

This set of computational thinking starters and plenaries will support the teaching of all aspects of computer science. Ranging from simple to difficult, a great way to develop students ability to think and prepare for new computer science curriculum.

By chris_vidal

GCSE Computer Science 9-1: Think - Make the Link (Unit 2 Exam and Unit 3 NEA)

GCSE Computer Science 9-1: Think - Make the Link (Unit 2 Exam and Unit 3 NEA)

OCR GCSE Computer Science Think - Make the Link A presentation developed from the OCR Specification to demonstrate to students how the knowledge and understanding for the new Unit 2 exam correlates with the skills required for the Unit 3 Non-Exam Assessment. By drawing the parallels between the content for the two assessments, I hope to develop stronger students with greater clarity in computational thinking as they approach the NEA in the Autumn term 2017, and prepare for the exam in Summer 2018. Scheme of work and lesson plans currently under development, and will follow.

By Pipjen77

Algorithms in Scratch

Algorithms in Scratch

A great scheme of work to introduce KS2 and KS3 students to coding, learning fundamentals of computer programming. Exercises, keyterms, examplars, guidance notes, assessments, student self evaluation and medium term plan supplied. This scheme of work is based on the new national curriculum for computer science.

By chris_vidal