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Python Programming–Jumbled Code Task Cards (Beginner) Coding Unplugged Activity

Python Programming–Jumbled Code Task Cards (Beginner) Coding Unplugged Activity

This resource is a brilliant way to get students to begin coding in Python! A set of 12 different Jumbled Code Python Task Cards which can be cut out, laminated and distributed to students. Instructions: Students need to look at the code and read the English statements (pseudo code) in order to put the jumbled python code in the correct order. These have been brilliant in my classroom and I have used them for starter and review activities. I have even used these as an introduction to coding in Python. These task cards also test students understanding of the following programming concepts: 1) syntax errors 2) logical errors 3) variables 4) print() function 5) input() function 6) int() function 6) if statements 7) while loops 8) lists 9) sorting & reverse sorting data in lists. Each task card also allows you to question students further on their knowledge of Python i.e: • “why was the data type string and not integer?” • “what is the difference between the input() and print() functions?” • “why did we need to use the int() function?E • Etc… Python software can be downloaded for free from: https://www.python.org/downloads/ There are also many online platforms in which Python can be used such as codeacademy.com
balsamgr8
Introduction to Creating Algorithms!

Introduction to Creating Algorithms!

The aim of this resource is to introduce students to the basic concepts of algorithm design. This resource is aimed at absolute beginners of algorithm design and takes you through the following parts: 1. Understanding algebra 2. Understanding Boolean 3. Using Variables 4. Introduction to Algorithm Design i. Sequence ii. Selection (IF, ELSE, ELSE IF) iii. Variables iv. Looping (WHILE and REPEAT) v. Functions Each section includes activities to develop student understanding of the concept. The work finishes with a differentiated consolidation challenge, applying the concepts learned throughout the unit. ***Please leave a Review!***
RobbotResources
Introduction to Computer Science Unplugged - Cup Stacking!

Introduction to Computer Science Unplugged - Cup Stacking!

The aim of this lesson is to introduce students to writing their first ever code! Students will not need to use a computer! Starter - Which job would you rather do: Formula 1 Driver or a Formula 1 Mechanic? Introduction to different types of IT users: Formula 1 Driver is the expert user of software while the Mechanic is the creator of the software. Task 1: Robots and Programmers - Get your Robot to a specific location and back using the given commands. Main task: Cup stacking - use the symbols available and create the differentiated structures as shown. For the lesson you will also need: Plastic cups Poster paper Pens to write code Print out the resource packs for each group of students. I have used this lesson for students between years 5 and 9, all of which have thoroughly enjoyed it! ***Please leave a review!***
RobbotResources
Computational Thinking and the Digital Competence Framework

Computational Thinking and the Digital Competence Framework

My latest poster shows how the understanding of Computational Thinking underpins all concepts of the Digital Competence Framework (DCF). I have given examples of how each concept can be applied to primary strands of the framework. Feel free to download and use as part of CPD sessions! ***Please leave a review!***
RobbotResources
Computing - HTML and CSS Web Development SOW

Computing - HTML and CSS Web Development SOW

This 10 lesson SOW teaches students what HTML and CSS do and how the are used together to develop website content. Through the 10 lesson scheme of work, students are taken through the basics of HTML and CSS and provided with the opportunity to develop their own website. All teaching materials, HTML/CSS code samples, end of unit assessment and marksheet provided.
HeatonMoorDigital
Y7 Computing Algorithms Unit

Y7 Computing Algorithms Unit

This is the unit of work I created to introduce my Y7 students to Algorithms, Problem Solving, Pseudocode and Computational Thinking. In the unit, there is the Activity Sheets which introduce: Grid References, Loops, Problem Solving, Trace Tables amongst others. The students trace code as it executes, keeping track of automated buses as they drive. Variables are brought in to track fuel, as well as booleans etc. This unit has been incredibly successful at boosting students understanding of developing and writing algorithms and when we move onto our units in Scratch coding / Python coding, they much better understand the terminiology All in, this can be 'rushed' in 6 lessons, or taking more time to delve into the Computing Acts can take it to 8 and beyond. With new GCSE and IGCSE courses covering some of the material, it is also something that could easily be expanded for students to undertake some of their own investigations into some relevant areas in AI etc.
PaperAirplane
KS2 / KS3 Scratch superunit - introduction and follow-up unit

KS2 / KS3 Scratch superunit - introduction and follow-up unit

This bundle contains two units of work for Scratch, including at least 14 lessons in total (some may take longer, depending on programming speed). It can be broken down into two units, or potentially completed in one go. I have completed these with the same students over two years - the introductory unit in Y5 and then the second unit in Y6. However, this could be used with older children with little Scratch experience. The lessons conatined are as follows: Unit 1 Introduction to Scratch - algorithms Joke - sequencing Disco - sequencing / iteration Etch-a-sketch - controlling sprites Maze - Selection / iteration Assessment Unit 2 Flowcharts - algorithms Chatbot - sequencing / selection Scrolling maze - variables Falling fruit - indefinite iteration / variables Breakout - Variables / subroutines Rock, Paper, Scissors - Definite iteration / subroutines Assessment
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Scratch intermediate unit

KS2 / KS3 Scratch intermediate unit

This unit is designed to be used after the initial Scratch unit, and contains lessons on flowcharts, sequencing, selection, iteration, variables and subroutines. The games that will be made through this unit include: A chatbot A scrolling maze Falling Fruit game Breakout Rock, paper, scissors Following the flowcharts lesson, the students will complete the other lessons to create the above programs, and then finish with an assessment. The assessment says Y6 at the top as this was the year group I have used it with, but that is because my Y5s completed the introductory unit and so moved onto this in Y6. However, this could be used for KS2 or KS3, depending on programming and Scratch experience.
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Scratch Assessment

KS2 / KS3 Scratch Assessment

This assessment is similar but more advanced than the introductory Scratch unit assessment in my shop, and includes questions on subroutines and variables as well as algorithms, sequencing, selection and iteration. This is aimed at students who have completed two units of Scratch.
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Rock paper scissors tutorial - subroutines

KS2 / KS3 Rock paper scissors tutorial - subroutines

This lesson is for students who have completed the introductory unit of Scratch, or have other experience in Scratch or other programming languages. The lesson focuses on creating a game using subroutines, and includes a presentation which introduces the task, the complete code for demonstration purposes and starter code for the students. There is also a tutorial for the students to complete the creation of the game following the demonstration.
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Scratch Breakout Game - subroutines

KS2 / KS3 Scratch Breakout Game - subroutines

This resource is for students who have experience in Scratch or other programming languages, including those who have completed the introductory unit of Scratch. The resource contains a powerpoint presentation to introduce subroutines, and a tutorial for students to create the game. It also includes the full game for demonstration and debugging purposes.
MrHawes8