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Stasiland - Talking Germany. Talk with Roland Jahn, Head of Stasi Archives

Stasiland - Talking Germany. Talk with Roland Jahn, Head of Stasi Archives

Worksheet for the Deutsche Welle video clip, Talking Germany. Talk with Roland Jahn, Head of Stasi Archives. The interview looks at Roland Jahn’s role as a journalist and dissident in East Germany, his expulsion from the country, work to expose former-Stasi officers since the reunification of Germany and his work managing the Stasi archives. Excellent resource for teh teaching of Stasiland.
WayneWoods
World Book Day Lesson

World Book Day Lesson

Starter quiz Introduction to the books offered for teenagers on World Book Day (with tokens) Activity based on Patrick Ness’ The Knife of Never Letting Go
marshc3
KS3, class reader "Skellig" chapter 6, foreshadowing, close reading, analysis, effect of language

KS3, class reader "Skellig" chapter 6, foreshadowing, close reading, analysis, effect of language

This lesson goes alongside chapter 6 of “Skellig” and introduces the idea of foreshadowing to the class (at least, when I taught this to year 8 they had not previously encountered the term). First of all, the idea of foreshadowing is embedded using images and then there is a close focus on the description of Skellig in chapter 6 of the novel. The pupils are then asked to select three pieces of evidence and, for each one, explain how it foreshadows what it does.
knapster
KS3, class reader, "Skellig" chapter 5, reading skills, deduction and inference.

KS3, class reader, "Skellig" chapter 5, reading skills, deduction and inference.

Planned for a year 8 class studying “Skellig”, this lesson is taught once the pupils have read up to and including chapter 5. The lesson builds the skill of inference through questioning. There is a focus on what can be inferred from the nicknames used in the novel. Pupils are asked to do some thought-tracking to demonstrate what they have inferred about Michael’s feelings. The lesson culminates with the pupils being asked to write a short diary entry, using the thoughts and feelings that they’ve inferred during the course of the lesson. This diary entry could be extended into homework.
knapster
KS3, "Skellig", LESSON ONE, chapter 3, language, mood of fear, analysis, create a teaching resource

KS3, "Skellig", LESSON ONE, chapter 3, language, mood of fear, analysis, create a teaching resource

Planned for a year 8 class as part of their study of “Skellig”, this lesson opens with an analysis of a couple of paragraphs from ‘Hunted’ by Kevin Crossley Holland. The focus of the lesson is on how a writer uses language to create a mood of fear. The pupils are asked to do some text marking as the paragraphs are read and then to match some given annotations with the evidence that they’ve underlined. For more able pupils, these annotations could be omitted and the children asked to provide their own annotations. The lesson then takes the pupils through the reading of chapters 1 and 2 and pauses on chapter 3 when Michael enters and begins to explore the garage. The pupils are then asked to apply what they’ve learned about the way in which language can create a mood of fear by making a teaching resource. Some suggestions are given: cloze passages, card sorts and so on.
knapster
KS3, KS4, non-fiction reading, language, structure, effect, analysis, Marathon des Sables, lesson hw

KS3, KS4, non-fiction reading, language, structure, effect, analysis, Marathon des Sables, lesson hw

I planned this for a year nine class as part of a unit of work on non-fiction, specifically journeys. The lesson uses a recount text by Mark Hines who has run the Marathon des Sables and guides the pupils through the spotting and then the analysis of various language and structural features. Once they have read the full text, they are then asked to provide all the elements of a P.E.E response but in grid format. Pupils who don’t need the scaffolding of the grid could be asked to write their response in prose. The homework task is a second recount of the Marathon by a female runner with some multiple choice questions intended to consolidate pupils’ reading skills. Though planned for KS3, this could also be used with KS4 students who are in need of practice when it comes to their reading of non-fiction.
knapster
KS3, KS2, poetry, creative writing, W.H.Davies, "Leisure", close reading, analysis, effect

KS3, KS2, poetry, creative writing, W.H.Davies, "Leisure", close reading, analysis, effect

Created for a year 8 class but suitable at the top of KS2 as well as KS3, this lesson uses the poem “Leisure” by William Henry Davies and asks the pupils to update the poem for their own context. Prior to that, however, the pupils are asked to explore and comment on the effect of the long vowel sounds and the simile used in the poem, being able to explain what is Davies’ message in the poem. My own class worked in pairs to create their own poems and I was genuinely impressed by many of the outcomes! They seemed to find that matching their ideas to Davies’ structure worked as a scaffold.
knapster
KS4, AQA GCSE Eng Lang, paper 2, question 2, question 3, CHILDHOOD, inference, synthesis, language

KS4, AQA GCSE Eng Lang, paper 2, question 2, question 3, CHILDHOOD, inference, synthesis, language

Planned for my year 11 class, whose mock exam had revealed weaknesses in their approach to English Language paper 2, this lesson uses two texts about childhood - Henry Mayhew’s description of the watercress girl and an abridged extract from the Guardian - ‘Living Dolls’ about child beauty pageants. The lesson begins by using images to help the students hone their skills of inference and synthesis. Moving onto question 3, the lesson uses the mark criteria to reinforce for the students the shape and content of their response. The intention is that the students will write their response to question 2 in class and will work on the response to question 3 for homework.
knapster
KS2, KS3, "War Horse", onomatopoeia, writing poetry, creative writing, animals at war

KS2, KS3, "War Horse", onomatopoeia, writing poetry, creative writing, animals at war

Planned for a year 7 class who were entering a poetry creative writing competition, this lesson focuses on writing using onomatopoeia to evoke the experience of an animal at war. The lesson begins with some discussion about the role of animals in warfare. Then the focus turns to an extract from “War Horse” and there are three questions to focus pupils on the effect of Morpurgo’s writing here. Having seen how Morpurgo uses onomatopoeia (and other strategies) to evoke the experience of war for an animal, the pupils are then given the story of Jack, a terrier who served on the Western Front during the first World War. They are then asked to write a poem about Jack’s experiences, using onomatopoeia. Though planned for KS3, this would work at KS2 and would be be effective alongside a reading of Morpurgo’s novel.
knapster
KS4 GCSE AQA Eng Lang Paper 2 Q 3 Language Analysis Effect Non Fiction "The Places In Between"

KS4 GCSE AQA Eng Lang Paper 2 Q 3 Language Analysis Effect Non Fiction "The Places In Between"

Planned for a year 11 class with target grades of 4 and 5, this uses an excerpt from Rory Stewart’s “The Places in Between” and the lesson is a methodical walkthrough of the skills required for success on paper 2, question 3, the analysis of language. The lesson uses the bullet points from the mark scheme as the success criteria for a step-by-step addressing of the skills that need to be demonstrated by the students in their response. There is also a homework text - also from Rory Stewart’s book - with 11 multiple-choice questions that focus on the same reading skills as the lesson.
knapster