Primary ancient greek language and literature resources

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Harry Potter characters and their links to classical (Roman & Greek) mythology

Harry Potter characters and their links to classical (Roman & Greek) mythology

Did you know that most of the names of characters and magical creatures in the Harry Potter series have roots in classical mythology and Latin and/or Ancient Greek? Do your students love Harry Potter? This is a ready to use, editable Powerpoint presentation with slides of 24 different characters and creatures from the Harry Potter series, where possible with images from the movie. In the notes for each slide you will find the description of that slide: the connection between that specific Harry Potter character and Latin or Ancient Greek language and/or mythology. Let the students recognise the characters and teach them about the links with the classics, to let them discover once again that the classics really are all around us, if only we learn to see them!

By CreativeClassics

Homer's Odyssey - Book I: Athene Visits Telemachus

Homer's Odyssey - Book I: Athene Visits Telemachus

This bundle consists of everything a teacher needs to teach Book I of Homer's Odyssey. 1) Who were the Greek Gods 2) Book I: Athene visits Telemachus: Key events 3) Book I: Athene visits Telemachus: characters & themes. This bundle consists of 3x PowerPoint 3x Worksheets 1x Greek Gods information cards All of the lessons are differentiated and accessible for all ability ranges. But they also encourage the most able to extend themselves and link to Ancient Greek society.

By matthew_nolan

Who were the Greek Gods? (whole lesson)

Who were the Greek Gods? (whole lesson)

Who were the Greek Gods? (Whole Lesson) This resource contains: 1x PowerPoint Lesson 1X Olympian Gods information cards The lesson introduces students to the Greek Gods first by using information cards. It then encourages the students to make inferences about Ancient Greek Society from the Gods that they worshiped. It is an effective way to getting students to link actions people took to religion. This is especially beneficial when studying Homer's Odyssey, Iliad or Greek Tragedies.

By matthew_nolan

Ancient Greece Bundle

Ancient Greece Bundle

Save 79% This creative and time saving bundle includes independent learning, a display, listening and sorting and writing! The Greeks - An Introductory Page. Encourage independent learning by asking your class what they would like to learn about Ancient Greece or the Greeks. Then, as a group or in small groups, get them to brainstorm what they already know. Fantastic start to any Greek Project! Whip up a display in an instant! This PowerPoint of images & a title will save your hours of searching. Just press print. Three titles to go with the display above. The title to choose from read: 'Ancient Greece', 'The Greeks' and 'Greek Gods' Greek Patterns and a Greek Vase Template. Encourage creativity and manual dexterity with the Greek Vase template which is all ready to add pattern to. My popular Pandora's Box Listening and sorting Activity. Read the story and then ask your students to sort the facts into true or false. A wonderful stimulus for discussion! An excellent planning sheet for your class to plan a letter to a Greek God or Goddess.

By BubbleResources

Designing Greek Monuments in 3D

Designing Greek Monuments in 3D

In the Designing Greek Monuments in 3D lesson, students design new monuments to honor events in Greek history, Greek gods, or another aspect of Ancient Greece. After sketching their design on paper, students create their designs in 3D using the web-based modeling tool TinkerCad. Finally, students explain their creations in a short essay to accompany their designs. Topics addressed: Architectural style of monuments in Ancient Greece Historical and cultural significance of Greek monuments Primary CT concept: abstraction. Students distill information about a Greek god or an event in Greek history into a relatively simple 3D design that symbolizes their chosen topic. Students will be able to: Design an architectural structure to represent a Greek god or event in Greek history Create a monument in 3D using TinkerCad Explain how their monument symbolizes their chosen topic Materials: PowerPoint presentation Student worksheet TinkerCad Prep: Create a Google Doc assignment in Google Classroom where students can write their short essay and share the link to their monument in TinkerCad Familiarize yourself with TinkerCad for thirty minutes or so, to better support students who have questions while learning how to create models in 3D Suggested lesson breakdown: This activity can be run in one longer period, or split over two shorter periods. 10min – activity introduction with PowerPoint presentation 15min – students (individually) select a topic for their monument and draw their 2D sketch on the worksheet 5min – walk students through logging into TinkerCad 10min – students (individually) work through TinkerCad introductory lessons 40min – students create their monuments using TinkerCad 10min – students write a short two-paragraph essay explaining how their design relates to their selected topic

By eli17

Modernizing Myths from Ancient Greece

Modernizing Myths from Ancient Greece

In the Modernizing Greek Myths lesson, students read and summarize a classic myth from Ancient Greece. Working in teams, they then brainstorm ways to bring that myth into the modern age. Teams write three minute plays based on their modern ideas, performing their work in front of the class to complete the project. The source myths for this activity were written by Lin Donn, and the King Midas radio play embedded in the PowerPoint presentation was created by the BBC. Topics addressed: Cultural and religious significance of Ancient Greek myths Primary CT concept: abstraction. Students identify the central theme and/or moral from their myth and create an entirely new story that symbolizes the same tenet. Students will be able to: Identify the central theme and moral of a specific Greek myth Write and perform a modern adaptation of a Greek myth of their choosing Materials: PowerPoint presentation Student worksheet Original myths Lined paper for students to write their short plays Prep: Print enough copies of each original myth such that teams will have at least a few options to choose from Suggested lesson breakdown: 2min – activity introduction with PowerPoint presentation 15min – class listens to King Midas myth radio play (in PowerPoint presentation) 5min – finish introducing activity with PowerPoint presentation 15min – teams of three students read and summarize their selected Greek myth 30-60min – teams write their modern adaptations in play form 20-30min – teams present their plays to the class

By eli17

Harry Potter spells and curses in Latin

Harry Potter spells and curses in Latin

Do your students love Harry Potter too? This small assignments helps them discover how much Latin (and some Greek!) is in the Harry Potter world, by teaching them the Latin origins of some of the spells, to discover that Harry Potter and his friends actually SPEAK a lot of Latin! Answer sheet is included. This is great in combination with another of my resources: Harry Potter characters and their links to classical mythology!

By CreativeClassics

Homework: Greek Mythological Hero

Homework: Greek Mythological Hero

This differentiated homework asks pupils to create, illustrate and describe their own Greek Hero. We used the hero in their stories the following week but this could equally be used as a stand alone homework related to your topic.

By Klein100

Year 1 proudness assembly

Year 1 proudness assembly

This was an assembly I carried out with my Year 1 class. This was a religious assembly based around the value of being proud. The assembly tells the story of Icarus. I have written the script including different parts and lots of narrators, ideas for songs and also a powerpoint presentation (of pictures) which is referred to in the script and shows when to change the slides. This assembly script can be easily adapted to suit different year groups as well as taking out the religious parts if it's not a religious assembly.

By jessmurray10

Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class Play This class play can be used as an assembly (for performance) or as a class play, to be read within the classroom. It is part of a set of scripts written on the Ancient Greek Myths which includes Guided Reading scripts plus quizzes. The poem - The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt - is included in the text. Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down Duration - around 10 - 15 minutes Sample Text: Narrator: Now, that’s better. (Ushering Incey Wincey Spider and Little Miss Muffet back to their seats) (To audience) You see how ridiculous this fear of spiders is? What do they call it? Arachn (Enter Arachne, scuttling on in spider costume) Arachne: Someone mention my name? Narrator: Ah! You’d be Arachne! As in Arachnophobia? Arachne: Well, I have no fear of spiders. I just am one! All thanks to (Enter Athene) Athene: Me! Arachne: Wretched goddess! (Athene scowls and raises her hand) Athene: (Menacingly) I’d be very careful what you say, if I were you Arachne! That tongue of yours has already got you into a whole heap of trouble! Arachne: (Gesturing at the spider outfit) Oh you mean this? Just because I said I was a better spinner than you! Athene: Foolish girl! What arrogance! You had to be punished! Arachne: That wasn’t quite the only reason I got punished, was it? Narrator: I’d say that was ample reason! Definitely too big for her boots, this one! Arachne: (Wailing) But I was brilliant at my craft. Athene: And didn’t you know it! You had to be taken down a peg or two.

By suesplays

Pandora's Box Assembly or Class Play

Pandora's Box Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Pandora's Box Assembly or Class Play This class play can be used as an assembly (for performance) or as a class play, to be read within the classroom. Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down Duration - around 15 - 20 minutes reading not including music suggestions. The Seven Deadly Sins plus all those Vices? No wonder our Narrator is worried! But as with all good stories, this one has a happy ending - well, maybe not for all those baddies! This is one of a collection of Ancient Greek Myth scripts – assemblies and guided reading scripts, sold as separate and combined products. This play could also be used as a PSHE resource – on resisting temptation, and the victory of good (hope) over evil (Seven Deadly Sins plus, in this case 19 Vices). Sample Text: Music 5 – You’re Beautiful – James Blunt (Epimetheus sings love song to Pandora) Narrator: (Indicating for music to stop) Yes, yes. We get it! Young love! Epimetheus: Oh come on! Look at this perfect woman? How could I possibly resist? Narrator: (To audience) Aha! Somebody else who couldn’t resist temptation! (To Pandora) No offence to you, madam. (To Epimetheus) But did you not look a little deeper? I mean, yes, she’s undoubtedly beautiful but (Optional burst of The Price You Pay – Bruce Springsteen) Pandora: (Angrily) Oh right! It’s the blond argument, right? The ‘well, if she looks that good, there can’t be much underneath’? No spirit, heh? Music 6 Missionary Man – Eurythmics (Pandora throws off her ‘pretty clothes’ displaying a much stronger image) Narrator: (Holding up hand for music to stop) Whoa! That’s not the Perfect Pandora I was expecting! Epimetheus: (Gasping) And that’s not a side of my wife I’ve ever seen before! Pandora: Of course not! You only ever wanted me to be that perfect ‘domestic goddess’ ��� sitting around, looking pretty, staring vacantly out to space! Epimetheus: Well, isn’t that what wives are supposed to do? Narrator: Not this one, I suspect! (Optional excerpt of Thorn in my Side – Eurythmics – Pandora strutting up and down) Narrator: (Holding hand up) OK. Yes, we’ve got it! So underneath all that sweetness was a whole heap of frustration! Pandora: More like mega boredom! I mean, what was I supposed to do all day? Epimetheus: Stay out of mischief?

By suesplays