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Kodu Game Lab Tutorial Series

Kodu Game Lab Tutorial Series

Kodu is an excellent tool to teach pupils the basics of programming and algorithms. In my video tutorial course, I have broken down a wide range of skills and put them into short, easy to follow videos. Whilst the videos are part of a greater package I use for teaching Kodu and in particular programming, algorithms and problem decomposition / solving, I am happy for everyone to use the videos free of charge. I upload new videos each week, with the aim of creating a 12 - 14 lesson series. This tutorial series is aimed at KS3 pupils and has wide ranging differentiation opportunities.
staffgca
KS3 Computational Thinking Bundle

KS3 Computational Thinking Bundle

This bundle combines all my KS3 focused computational thinking resource. This bundle includes the following resources: 1. Computational thinking for KS3 2. Computational thinking problem solving 3. Application of computational thinking - create an interactive story 4. Computational thinking classroom ideas posters
RobbotResources
Application of Computational Thinking - Create an Interactive Story

Application of Computational Thinking - Create an Interactive Story

This unit of work introduces students (I use this with year 7) to the concepts of computational thinking and logical thinking. It is split into three fully differentiated sections: 1. Design an interactive story using a flowchart to identify the key decision points within your story. 2. Create an interactive story using PowerPoint, hyperlinking the slides to the correct locations. 3. Test and evaluate your story and make improvements where required. I have included some slides to provide additional assistance, for example hyperlinking auto shapes, removing the on mouse click advancements, etc. Alongside developing computational thinking skills, this unit is also an opportunity for students to develop their graphic design skills. I have also included an example interactive story so students can get an idea of what they could create themselves, while considering what they could make even better themselves. This resource is a perfect continuation from my Introduction Computational Thinking for KS3 resource! ***Please Leave a Review***
RobbotResources
OCR GCSE Computer Science NEA task preparations (J276)

OCR GCSE Computer Science NEA task preparations (J276)

This 3-lesson unit introduces GCSE students to the rules surrounding their conduct in the NEA element of the OCR GCSE Computer Science (J276). Includes teachers guide, practice tasks, lots of practical activities and class discussions and attractive PowerPoint presentations to help the pupils feel prepared before they tackle the NEA task themselves. It helps them become familiar with the following: • how they must act during the NEA • what they are and are not allowed help with • finding resources in the resource bank • reminder of writing flowcharts and pseudocode • understanding the marksheet and what is expected for each element to get the highest marks possible • how to approach the topic It is recommended that this unit is delivered directly before they start the NEA or alternatively you can always stop the NEA and give the lessons when you think they are relevant.
nwilkin
Scratch Complete Scheme of Learning - Game Design

Scratch Complete Scheme of Learning - Game Design

A Full scheme of work for Scratch. In this scheme students will design, implement and test a game. The objectives for the students are to gain a knowledge of Scratch to allow them to gain a knowledge of programming In this pack is a Full Scheme of learning for 12 lessons, Lessons in 2 separate packs, resources linking to the lessons and a homework sheet. This scheme would be suitable for Upper KS2/ Lower KS3.
niall-
Using functions and creating a Tkinter GUI interface in Python

Using functions and creating a Tkinter GUI interface in Python

21 quick, simple challenges covering using functions and two documents on how to use Tkinter to create a GUI interface. Includes explanation, example code and suggested possible answers. A BONUS “Chunky Challenge” included allowing your students to practice these skills in a larger task to prepare for more complex tasks that involve computational thinking skills. In order to get the most out of these documents I recommend you use them in the following order: functions, GUI part 1, GUI part 2 and finally the chunky challenge. From my experience in teaching Python and other programming languages, I feel it works best when pupils only learn about using functions when they are starting to create more advanced programs that require them. For this reason, this document does assume a lot of previous confidence with using Python's basic programming structure before they tackle this section. If you are a teacher who likes to introduce functions early on in the pupils programming experience, then the functions document will not work in your classroom as it assumes pupils have a confidence with the basic programming skills already in order to complete the challenges. The skills the pupils must already have confidence with include: • input • print • if statements • loops (for and while) • strings • mathematical operators • tuples and lists • saving to and reading from a text file • saving to and reading from a .csv file For more lessons and complete units of work visit www.nicholawilkin.com.
nwilkin
MORE Python Challenges - The Basics

MORE Python Challenges - The Basics

Includes a handout giving example code and 7 NEW challenges to try out. Python files also included to allow you to demonstrate one possible answer for each challenge to your class. Pupils will use the following programming features to complete the challenges: • input • print • line breaks • integer and floating-point numbers • basic mathematical functions (+, -, *, / and //) Ideal for a NEA resource bank or to use for starter or plenary activities or use them for homework tasks. Easy to use and integrate into your lessons and handy to have around for pupils who finish other challenges early and need something to do. For more high-quality, ready to use computing and ICT resources visit www.nicholawilkin.com
nwilkin
GCSE Bitmap Image File Size Calculator Programming Lesson

GCSE Bitmap Image File Size Calculator Programming Lesson

This lesson is based around programming skills and knowledge, as the students work through the worksheet (on the computers is best a they can copy and paste code snippets into the other document). Once they have answered the questions on the worksheet they should also have the Bitmap Calculator Code document containing the code snippets required to create the program. Then they can go onto Visual Basic to write the program, and test it to see if it is working correctly. There are also a couple of extension tasks at the bottom of the worksheet. I have also included the final code that I used to demonstrate the program working at the start of the lesson, and the PowerPoint which I used to outline the task and give them instructions on how to complete the tasks.
MrHawes8
Microbit Offline Programming Homework

Microbit Offline Programming Homework

This homework is intended for students to complete without having to use a computer (useful if they don't have one at home). The instructions are given on the left hand side of the sheet, and they can cut and stick the code blocks onto the right hand side. If students wish to complete on the computer then they can, and this also allows them to test their code to see if it works. Answers also included in the form of an image.
MrHawes8