Secondary English language learning resources: texts

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A Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come!

A Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come!

This engaging and informative lesson enables students to make insightful and developed interpretations of Dickens’ use of language in describing ‘The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come’ in A Christmas Carol. In particular, they explore how the descriptive language used to describe the appearance, mannerisms, and movements aid the haunting portrayal of the ghost. The lesson follows a step-by-step learning journey, in which children learn through: - Reading and understanding the key plot elements of stave 4 - in which The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come appears; - Identifying and exemplifying the key language features used by Dickens in describing the ghost, including its appearance, actions, and mannerisms; - Analysing the extent to which the language used creates a haunting and imposing image of the ghost; - Peer assessing each other's learning attempts. Included is: - Whole lesson PowerPoint - colourful and comprehensive; - Extract - Stave 4 of A Christmas Carol; - Dickens' Language: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Worksheet (and completed answer sheet for teachers); - Analysis template with success criteria for creating well-structured responses; - Comprehensive lesson plan. There are also opportunities for group learning, peer assessment, and whole class discussion. This was originally taught to mixed ability year 10 groups, but can easily be differentiated for groups of different ages and abilities. All images are licensed for commercial use, and image rights are listed on the last page of the presentation.

By TandLGuru

A Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Present!

A Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Present!

This engaging and informative lesson enables students to make insightful and developed interpretations regarding ‘The Ghost of Christmas Present’ in ‘A Christmas Carol.’ In particular, they explore the key messages about generosity and human kindness that Dickens aims to get across through his portrayal of the ghost. The lesson follows a step-by-step learning journey, in which children learn through: - Reading and understanding the key plot elements of stave 3 - in which The Ghost of Christmas Present appears; - Identifying and exemplifying the key features of the ghost, including its appearance, actions, and mannerisms; - Analysing the extent to which the ghost represents Dickens' message about generosity; - Peer assessing each other's learning attempts. Included is: - Whole lesson PowerPoint - colourful and comprehensive; - Extract - Stave 3 of A Christmas Carol; - Features of The Ghost of Christmas Present Worksheet (and completed answer sheet for teachers); - Analysis template with success criteria for creating well-structured responses; - Comprehensive lesson plan. There are also opportunities for group learning, peer assessment, and whole class discussion. This was originally taught to mixed ability year 10 groups, but can easily be differentiated for groups of different ages and abilities. All images are licensed for commercial use, and image rights are listed on the last page of the presentation.

By TandLGuru

A Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Past!

A Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Past!

This engaging and informative lesson students to make insightful and developed interpretations of The Ghost of Christmas Past in Charles Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol.’ In particular, they explore the ghost’s physical appearance, actions, and mannerisms, and analyse the extent to which the ghost symbolises the power of memories. The lesson follows a step-by-step learning journey, in which children learn through: - Reading and understanding the key plot elements of stave 2 - in which The Ghost of Christmas Past appears; - Identifying and exemplifying the key features of the ghost, including its appearance, actions, and mannerisms; - Analysing the extent to which the ghost represents the power of memories; - Peer assessing each other's learning attempts. Included is: - Whole lesson PowerPoint - colourful and comprehensive; - Extract - Chapter 2 of A Christmas Carol; - Features of The Ghost of Christmas Past Worksheet (and completed answer sheet for teachers); - Analysis template with success criteria for creating well-structured responses; - Comprehensive lesson plan. There are also opportunities for group learning, peer assessment, and whole class discussion. This was originally taught to mixed ability year 10 groups, but can easily be differentiated for groups of different ages and abilities. All images are licensed for commercial use, and image rights are listed on the last page of the presentation.

By TandLGuru

A Christmas Carol: The Context of Victorian Britain!

A Christmas Carol: The Context of Victorian Britain!

This engaging and informative lesson students to make sustained and developed links between Dickens’ A Christmas Carol and its social and historical context. In particular, students learn about the harsh treatment of the poor in Victorian society, the selfishness and cruelty of those in power, and attitudes towards sin, religion, and the supernatural. The lesson explores how Dickens explores these ideas through the allegorical nature of the text. The lesson follows a step-by-step learning journey, in which children learn through: - Understanding key information about Charles Dickens, his life, and influences; - Researching and sharing key contextual understanding about the rich, poor, healthcare, and religion in the 19th Century; - Reading Stave 1 of 'A Christmas Carol' and identifying evidence of contextual influences; - Analysing how Dickens presents his views about the cruelty of 19th Century life through the opening of the text; - Peer assessing each other's learning attempts. Included is: - Whole lesson PowerPoint - colourful and comprehensive; - Extract - Chapter 1 of A Christmas Carol; - Template for researching 19th Century life (and completed answer sheet for teachers); - Analysis template with success criteria for creating well-structured responses; - Comprehensive lesson plan. There are also opportunities for group learning, peer assessment, and whole class discussion. This was originally taught to mixed ability year 10 groups, but can easily be differentiated for groups of different ages and abilities. All images are licensed for commercial use, and image rights are listed on the last page of the presentation.

By TandLGuru

Cinderella-the sequel. A play for young English learners

Cinderella-the sequel. A play for young English learners

This is a short play I wrote for an English summer camp concert. It's suitable for learners up to about 12 or 13 years of age. It takes about 7 to 10 minutes. The main aim is to give them a chance to use their English in a fun setting. There are 13 characters in the play but it would be easy to add or remove characters. I've included a Word document for those of you who would like to edit the play for your class or group. My 11- to-13- year-olds loved doing this play, which was easy enough for them to learn in about 4 days. I hope yours enjoy it too!

By mbrizz

Features of Creative Writing

Features of Creative Writing

This is a lesson where students identify features of writing and then try and write down some similes, personifications and metaphors of their own.

By ruizmatt9

The Woman in Black Huge Bundle!

The Woman in Black Huge Bundle!

THIS HUGE RESOURCE PACK CONTAINS ALL OF THE POPULAR WOMAN IN BLACK LESSONS, AND ALSO THE WOMAN IN BLACK COMPREHENSION BOOKLET AND THE WOMAN IN BLACK POINTLESS GAME! This engaging, varied, and informative scheme of learning is designed to help students gain understanding, assessment skills, and key interpretations of Susan Hill's ghost story 'The Woman in Black.' Made up of a wide-range of interesting and exciting lessons, students should complete this scheme having gathered vital skills in: interpreting the significant meanings of the text, understanding the writer's ideas within the text, analysing key characters, settings, and themes, and understanding Hill's language devices. Stimulating, visual, and easily adaptable, these lessons provide suggested learning objectives and outcomes for students of a wide-range of abilities - The vast majority of tasks are differentiated to allow for different abilities and needs in your classroom. Each lesson loosely follows this logical learning journey to ensure that students learn in bite-size steps: - Engaging - Defining/ Understanding - Identifying/Remembering - Analysing/ Creating - Peer or self evaluating. All of the lessons are interactive, employ a variety of different teaching and learning methods and styles, and are visually-engaging. Resources, worksheets, and lesson plans are all provided.

By TandLGuru

The Woman in Black Big Lesson Bundle!

The Woman in Black Big Lesson Bundle!

This engaging, varied, and informative scheme of learning is designed to help students gain understanding, assessment skills, and key interpretations of Susan Hill's ghost story 'The Woman in Black.' Made up of a wide-range of interesting and exciting lessons, students should complete this scheme having gathered vital skills in: interpreting the significant meanings of the text, understanding the writer's ideas within the text, analysing key characters, settings, and themes, and understanding Hill's language devices. Stimulating, visual, and easily adaptable, these lessons provide suggested learning objectives and outcomes for students of a wide-range of abilities - The vast majority of tasks are differentiated to allow for different abilities and needs in your classroom. Each lesson loosely follows this logical learning journey to ensure that students learn in bite-size steps: - Engaging - Defining/ Understanding - Identifying/Remembering - Analysing/ Creating - Peer or self evaluating. All of the lessons are interactive, employ a variety of different teaching and learning methods and styles, and are visually-engaging. Resources, worksheets, and lesson plans are all provided.

By TandLGuru

Three Little Pigs - Media/English/Fairy Tales/Adaptations/Newspapers

Three Little Pigs - Media/English/Fairy Tales/Adaptations/Newspapers

Using The Three Little Pigs as inspiration for this Media bundle, you'll find all you need to cover key terms such as adaptations and stereotypes. Please allow 3-5 hours to cover all material attached. Included: x3 PPTS Embedded videos (links in notes); sample sentence starts, differentiated activities - must,could, should approach. Students will consider the changing nature of how we view and interact with news stories today. Lessons will encourage speaking and listening. Students will also work on their writing skills, with a particular focus on their functional writing skills. I usually follow these lessons up with a segment on Fake News and I'm currently working on developing a bundle for that topic.

By LouiseLenihan

Three Little Pigs - L3 - Stereotypes and Letter to the Editor

Three Little Pigs - L3 - Stereotypes and Letter to the Editor

Building on the previous two lessons, lesson three aims to have students define and identify stereotypes. With this keyword in mind, students compose a scaffolded letter to an editor of a newspaper. I usually buy some newspapers the week of these lessons. Photocopying an article and a letter responding to these is a worthwhile activity in the lead up to this lesson. Students usually read the article/letter to the editor in groups. If these lessons have worked for you in the classroom, then please leave a review in the comments section below. It's always great to hear how a group progresses with these activities!

By LouiseLenihan

Exploring Tennyson's 'The Prelude' - Power and Conflict Poetry

Exploring Tennyson's 'The Prelude' - Power and Conflict Poetry

Perfect for mixed ability GCSE classes, this printable lesson helps pupils analyse Tennyson's 'The Prelude' by exploring its meaning (AO1) through language/structure (AO2) and considering how it presents wider ideas/issues (AO3). With model answers and differentiated questioning, this powerpoint can also be printed so pupils can independently explore the meaning (AO1), analyse the poem (AO2) and establish its links to wider context over 3 lessons. Pupils are given model answers for analytical and comparative writing so can then analyse the poem in prose and compare it to different poems in the anthology. In the final lesson, pupils are given the opportunity to write their own comparative essay following an exam answer.

By DeepaSabharwal

Power and Conflict Poetry - Hughes' Bayonet Charge

Power and Conflict Poetry - Hughes' Bayonet Charge

Perfect for mixed ability GCSE classes, this printable lesson helps pupils analyse Hughes' 'Bayonet Charge' by exploring its meaning (AO1) through language/structure (AO2) and considering how it presents wider ideas/issues (AO3). With model answers and differentiated questioning, this powerpoint can also be printed so pupils can independently explore the meaning (AO1), analyse the poem (AO2) and establish its links to wider context over 3 lessons. Pupils are given model answers for analytical and comparative writing so can then analyse the poem in prose and compare it to different poems in the anthology. In the final lesson, pupils are given the opportunity to write their own comparative essay following an exam answer.

By DeepaSabharwal