Whole-school urban and rural areas resources

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OCR A Level Geography - Structural Economic Change Case Study: South Wales

OCR A Level Geography - Structural Economic Change Case Study: South Wales

For the OCR A Level Geography specification, this handout details case study information on South Wales to meet the criteria set out in the Changing Spaces Making Places topic of the Human Interactions paper. The content covers structural economic change in the South Wales region, and includes more specific local detail on the planned closure of the Tata Steelworks in Port Talbot. The case study detail covers each of the sections given in the specification in detail (over 30 pages), including maps, statistics, photographs and written text. The specification content included is: - BEFORE: the demographic, socio-economic, cultural and environmental characteristics of South East Wales before structural economic change - DURING: the economic change that took place, and the role of the players involved in driving that change - AFTER: the demographic, socio-economic, cultural and environmental impacts of economic change on people and place We decided to give out this handout to our students (rather than them researching the information themselves) so that we could spend more time on evaluating the content in the classroom.

By ve209

Fieldwork in Lewisham, London for OCR A Level Geography - Social Inequality

Fieldwork in Lewisham, London for OCR A Level Geography - Social Inequality

Fieldwork handout (whole day) for Deptford and Blackheath in Lewisham, London to meet the requirements of the OCR A Level Geography specification - Changing Spaces Making Places topic from the Human Interactions paper. The day begins in Blackheath with background information to the area (including a brief history and some census data) and then guides students through several fieldwork tasks, including questionnaires and retail diversity surveys. The afternoon session is in Deptford, and follows the same outline of background information and data collection tasks. This is in order to introduce students to data collection methods (with discussion included on ethical implications of research and sampling strategies) ahead of their NEA Independent Investigations - our students found this day very useful and did come back to using/adapting some of these techniques for their own projects in different locations. A follow up evaluative task is included to encourage students to evaluate various indicators of social inequality in order to meet the following criteria from the specification: o the types of evidence of social inequality that can be found there such as housing, environmental quality, crime rates, digital divide o the range of factors that influence people’s social inequality such as income, gender, age, health, personal mobility, ethnicity and education o how social inequality impacts upon people’s daily lives in different ways.

By ve209

PaperWorks: KS3 Geography – Pack 3: Paper, Sustainability and Recycling

PaperWorks: KS3 Geography – Pack 3: Paper, Sustainability and Recycling

PaperWorks Pack 3 is an interactive resource designed to support Geography teaching at Key Stage 3, and some GCSE and A Level courses. It helps students to understand how the UK paper industry is a sustainable industry, and encourages them to consider how the principles of sustainability employed in the UK could be used in developing countries. The pack looks particularly at energy and water use. The paper industry requires large amounts of energy and water in the production of paper. In order to minimise the amounts used, paper mills employ modern Combined Heat and Power plants to maximise energy efficiencies and recycle much of the water used in papermaking. This is a complete lesson project with whiteboard presentation (including two videos and an interactive game), background information, a student project, and links to the online Study Area and further useful information. Students will discover paper as a real life contemporary case study. They will meet curriculum requirements by researching geographical issues in the news, such as sustainability and recycling and the implications for humans. Students at GCSE level will learn about sustainable development through researching renewable energy in the online study area and fulfil Edexcel’s requirement to study the management of forests. At A Level, students will use the online study area to explore the potential of sustainable energy and biodiversity and look at recycling on a local scale and how recycled material is used. PaperWorks Pack 3 also offers students the opportunities to: • understand … the key processes in: • human geography relating to: population and urbanisation; and the use of natural resources • understand how … human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems * The student project-related PDFs can be downloaded from TES. The accompanying presentation and videos are easy to find in the Secondary KS3 area at: http://www.paperworks.school. * These are the curriculum links for England but links for Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, together with the links for EdExel/AQA at GCSE and AS/AS level, are also available on the PaperWorks website.

By PaperWorks

Castleton Rural Fieldwork

Castleton Rural Fieldwork

New Edexcel A (9-1) fieldwork in a rural environment. Case study used was Castelton and there is a pre-visit powerpoint and workbook, field work booklet and post-visit workbook. There are also some blank data presentation graphs to complete and then be used for analysis

By a1mcl

Where do people live in Africa? - Population Distribution (Outstanding Lesson)

Where do people live in Africa? - Population Distribution (Outstanding Lesson)

This lesson has been observed several times and has always been rated as outstanding. This lesson introduces the concept of population distribution and the factors that influence it. It uses Africa as an example and gets the students to look at the wide variety of climates across Africa and why the population distribution is so uneven. A fantastic lesson for a unit of work on Africa, on Population or on Development. Download now!

By laumorrow

Settlements in the UK Flip Learning

Settlements in the UK Flip Learning

Settlements in the UK Flip Learning gives the students pre-lesson knowledge that they are expected to read before each lesson. Each lesson of knowledge is provided allowing the teacher to conduct different activities with students prior knowledge allowing less teaching but more embedding of their understanding. It also creates revision before, during & after the lesson to improve results. Lesson 1: Investigate the economic, social, political and cultural processes that have transformed large urban areas in the UK with some urban areas growing fast. Lesson 2: Examine how these processes have led to variations in the quality of urban residential areas (including housing, services, amenities and recreational areas), and the levels of deprivation within large urban areas. Lesson 3: Identify different types of rural settlement, including remote rural communities in upland areas, retirement communities, commuter villages, and explain how these have developed. Lesson 4: Investigate two contrasting rural regions in the UK, e.g. the Highlands of Scotland and South West to explain the variations in the quality of life and levels of deprivation. Lesson 5: Examine the environmental, social and economic impacts of rising demand for residential areas in one urban area in the UK. Lesson 6: Evaluate the success of strategies to improve urban areas, e.g. ‘rebranding’ and urban regeneration. Lesson 7: Examine the role of rural development schemes and larger projects, e.g. the Eden Project in stimulating growth in the rural economy and arresting outmigration. Lesson 8: Evaluate the success of planning policies such as ‘green belts’ and National Parks in both conserving valuable landscapes, as well as allowing economic development.

By tiddtalk

Urban Environments Flip Learning

Urban Environments Flip Learning

Urban Environments Flip Learning gives the students pre-lesson knowledge that they are expected to read before each lesson. Each lesson of knowledge is provided allowing the teacher to conduct different activities with students prior knowledge allowing less teaching but more embedding of their understanding. It also creates revision before, during & after the lesson to improve results. Lesson 1: Examine urbanisation trends globally and across different regions, including reasons for growth (migration and internal growth). Lesson 2: Contrast the economic activities, spatial growth and population of ‘megacities’ (cities with more than 10 million people) in the developed and developing world. Lesson 3: Examine urban challenges in the developed world, including food, energy, transport and waste disposal demands that may lead to concentrated resource consumption. Lesson 4: Examine urban challenges in the developing world, including slum housing, the informal economy and urban pollution, that lead to low quality of life. Lesson 5: Investigate why eco-footprints vary from city to city and assess how one named city in the developed world is lessening its eco-footprint by reducing energy consumption and waste generation. Lesson 6: Analyse the potential for more sustainable transport in a named city in the developed world. Lesson 7: Consider the success of strategies to improve quality of life in cities in the developing world: self-help schemes, the work of NGOs, urban planning (e.g. Curitiba). Lesson 8: Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of attempts to develop less-polluted cities, e.g. Masdar City, Mexico City.

By tiddtalk

Shanty Towns: Push & Pull Factors

Shanty Towns: Push & Pull Factors

Lesson Objective: • L/O 1: What is a shanty town, slum, favela? • L/O 2: What are the reasons for people moving to a shanty town? • L/O 3: What is ‘informal employment’? CHALLENGE: Explain why people move to urban areas and the problems that occur (Exam Question)

By tiddtalk

A bank of (purple pen) MRI, gap bridging lessons. Human geography.

A bank of (purple pen) MRI, gap bridging lessons. Human geography.

A selection of activities that pupils can use mid-way through or at the end of a unit or to top up learning at any point during the course. Students watch a video clip/clips or DVD on the subject. They then add detail to the mindmap. The GCSE question in the centre of the page links all of the content back to a GCSE context. Pupils complete this in purple pen to top up learning & demonstrate understanding. Tricky SPaG has been identified & pupils copy it 3 times. The resources cover much of what schools are asking for, in terms of topping up learning.

By andymcstump

Sustainability

Sustainability

Lesson Objective: Assess how one named city in the developed world is reducing its eco-footprint by reducing energy consumption and waste generation. • L/O 1: What does sustainability mean? • L/O 2: What can we do to reduce our Eco- footprint? CHALLENGE: Using examples, explain how new developments can be made more sustainable (exam question)

By tiddtalk

Migration

Migration

Lesson Objective: What is migration and problems does it bring? Prior Knowledge: Why live in a city? • L/O 1: What does the term urbanisation mean? • L/O 2: What does internal growth and migration mean? CHALLENGE: What problems does migration bring to cities? (Exam Question)

By tiddtalk