Zombie Apocalypse Brainiac Smorgasbord

Zombie Apocalypse Brainiac Smorgasbord

A.C.T.S. (Assessing Content in Theatrical Scenes) for Zombie Apocalypse Brainiac Smorgasbord Goal Students use theatre to identify scientific concepts Objectives: 1. Students divide into groups of five to read-through and perform scene as readers' theatre. 2. Students complete assessment following their performances, then check answers with script. 3. Students will research science to find the one premise mentioned in the script that is not valid. 4. Student group that identifies the invalid premise first will learn lines and perform the scene as a roving drama group performing in other classes/schools. 5. Student group with the highest scores on the assessment given to each group will understudy the actors while the remaining groups will also go to other classes with to set up the set and props. 6. Students in other classes will complete assessment individually or in groups. 7. Students in other classes will rate performance and scene using a survey. SCRIPT PROPS LIST Pizza box Plastic flower pots Bag of Sand Tealight containers (used) Cheesecloth or thin white or brige scarf Generator Small plastic bottle with yellow water Simulated trap
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Solar Bird Bath: Class Project and Scientific Study

Solar Bird Bath: Class Project and Scientific Study

Goal: To facilitate understanding of solar energy and its uses and develop an appreciation on how animals depend on humans during cold weather, as well as undertaking an engineering project and conducting an informal scientific study Objectives: 1. Students will learn how to use passive solar energy to melt ice in a bird bath so the birds can have a water source for drinking during the winter 2. Students will create the schematics to use in constructing a passive solar bird bath with assistance and/or guidance from an adult expert. 3. Students will use the schematics to build the passive solar bird bath with expery adult assistance. 4. Students will install the passive solar bird bath with expert adult assistance and present the project to parents, peers, and school staff. 5. Students will conduct and present the results of an informal scientific study. This unit project can be used at any grade level; however, the informal scentific study should be conducted by older children and gifted students Younger children and students with special needs can learn to observe and count/record data with teacher assistance.
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BULLIES, PINS, & SAFETY

BULLIES, PINS, & SAFETY

This unit for children in grades 5-7 helps students understand how important it is to support other children whose safety is at risk. Goal: To help students become empathic and able to express empathy by supporting students who are being bullied or feel unsafe by developing strategies to create safe school climates. Objective: Students will increase and/or develop empathy toward peers who are bullied and/or feel unsafe at school through discussion to assess their understanding, awareness, and empathy; interactive role-playing activities; reading and using critical thinking skills to debate whether or not the "safety pin" campaigns are effective in making people that are harassed feel more supported or just another trend that will soon pass; and creating products and activities that go beyond wearing a safety pin that potentially will change the school climate by forming a support network that helps students who are victims of bullies feel safe and empowered. All Graphics Are From Google Images
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Columbus Day Learning Ideas for Investigation and Discussion

Columbus Day Learning Ideas for Investigation and Discussion

After watching the History Channel video about Christopher Columbus, have students watch the following video and discuss the similarities and differences in the two videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aF_unlvjccA Link to Columbus Day Resource: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2015/10/11/why-is-columbus-day-still-a-u-s-federal-holiday/?utm_term=.96db7274ccc2
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Straws, Sticks, and Strings

Straws, Sticks, and Strings

CCSS for PreSchool*/Kindergarten** 3. Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0–20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects). *Typical students **Special Needs The objective of these activities is to help students visualize numbers through instruction and sensory/visual interaction using simple, familiar materials with which they interact and use to create tangible representations of numbers using their tactile, visual, and auditory senses. Typical students in pre-school and students with special needs enrolled in Kindergarten will benefit mostly from this hands-on lesson. However, older students with severe developmental disabilities may be able to learn numeration from this activity, as well.
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CHAPBooks: Using Skills Learned Through Reading Books to Write Books

CHAPBooks: Using Skills Learned Through Reading Books to Write Books

The Common Core asks students to read stories and literature, as well as more complex texts that provide facts and background knowledge in areas such as science and social studies. Students will be challenged and asked questions that push them to refer back to what they’ve read. This stresses critical-thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills that are required for success in college, career, and life. http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/ From Reading to Writing: CHAPBooks Using ELA CSCC Skill Development, Students Will Transition From Reading Books to Writing Books With Skills Acquired The goal of this extensive reading, comprehending, and writing literature using the ELA CSCC, students will learn how to identify story elements, language usage, how to summarize and re-tell the stories and/or information, distinguish different genres, recognize books by title and author and illustrator, analyze structure and theme is various types of literature, along with the other standards, as well as choose genres that appeal most to them when they get the opportunity to write their own poetry chap books (Assignment 1) and other types of books: non-fiction, storybooks, novels, science books, art books with descriptions of illustrations, how-to-books, cookbooks, etc. which will be available to check out in the classroom’s library. From Library to BookStore Students in higher grades (5-6-elementary, 7-8-middle school, and 9-12, high school) might want to create a bookstore and invest in having a few books printed, along with a poster advertising their book with illustrations created by the author or an artist commissioned to illustrate the cover.
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The First Memorial Tribute to Union Soldiers After Winning the Confederate War

The First Memorial Tribute to Union Soldiers After Winning the Confederate War

THE ONGOING DEBATE ABOUT THE ORIGINS OF THE FIRST DAY OF REMEMBRANCE FOR THE UNION SOLDIERS THAT GAVE THEIR LIVES TO PRESERVE THE UNION AND END SLAVERY http://usslave.blogspot.com/2011/05/slaves-started-memorial-day.html DISCUSSION FOR K-2 Explain why the compelling question is important to the student. Read the article to students in K-2, then have them listen to some of the songs mentioned while marching as if they are in a parade. Have them use inquiry to understand the article. DISCUSSION FOR 3-6 Explain why compelling questions are important. Instruct students in grades 3-5 to read the article in pairs and allow time for them to ask inquiry questions to further understanding. Use open-ended questions to assess students. *Use the article to make your own plan for celebrating Memorial Day or reenact the first Students in Grades 7-12 will research two articles that supports one of two debate topics, prepare for debate by developing questioD1.1.3-5. Explain why compelling questions are important ns and prepare arguments, and participate in the debate. COMMON CORE STANDARDS: D1.1.K-2. Explain why the compelling question is important to the student. D1.1.3-5. Explain why compelling questions are important D1.1.6-8/D1.1.9-12. Explain how a question represents key ideas in the field.
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Types of Soil: An Inquiry Study

Types of Soil: An Inquiry Study

Students in grades 3-8 will locate types of soil using several resources provided in the lesson plan: Students will engage in ten methods of inquiry to study the various types of soil collected. Soil is an important part of our ecosystem and various types of soil are useful for specific reasons. Using inquiry students will discover the differences in the types of soil and how each type interacts within the environment, how various types of soil provide things needed for our survival, and how we can preserve and care for our soil. While engaged in observation, collection, and interaction with various types of soil and their properties, students will engage in scientific inquiry as specified in the standards. "Science as inquiry is basic to science education and a controlling principle in the ultimate organization and selection of students' activities. The standards on inquiry highlight the ability to conduct inquiry and develop understanding about scientific inquiry. Students at all grade levels and in every domain of science should have the opportunity to use scientific inquiry and develop the ability to think and act in ways associated with inquiry, including asking questions, planning and conducting investigations, using appropriate tools and techniques to gather data, thinking critically and logically about relationships between evidence and explanations, constructing and analyzing alternative explanations, and communicating scientific arguments. The science as inquiry standards are described in terms of activities resulting in student development of certain abilities and in terms of student understanding of inquiry. " https://www.nap.edu/read/4962/chapter/8#105
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Flash Mob Challenge For Your School!

Flash Mob Challenge For Your School!

GOAL: Help students create their own flash mob dance to an oldie or current song and challenge every classroom to learn the dance and meet in the gym at a specific day and time to perform the flash dance to promote physical fitness. OBJECTIVES: 1.Students will suggest songs for the flash mob based on popularity and rhythm (could be an oldie or current hit song, hip-hop song, or popular jingle). 2. Students will create movement in rhythm with music with guidance from gym, music, and/or drama teacher (if available) using vintage dance move or current ones. 3.Students will rehearse the dance each day until they master it. 4. Students will be recorded on video performing their flash dance. 5. Students as a class will challenge every classroom and all staff to learn the dance by a specific date and time when the school gym or other space is available. 6. Students will continue to perfect their movements every day, increasing physical activity. 7. Students will join with students in other classes that accepted the challenge on the appointed day and time. There are links to flash mob videos. Here's a link one that focuses on bullying: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmDId5UPhIM
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Rabbit Research Project

Rabbit Research Project

Goal Students will be able to research facts about rabbits and compare fact with fiction, then use their creativity to create their own bunny stories or plays. Objectives 1. Students will learn that rabbits do not lay eggs, but give birth to living children 2. Students will learn how rabbits became part of Easter traditions. 3. Students will use information gathered to decide if they want to have a rabbit in the classroom. 4. Students will work together in groups to research the following information about caring for rabbits a. What is the best place to house a rabbit? b. What rabbits eat and how much? c. How to breed a bunny and care it's babies. 5. Students will use their creativity to act out or write stories about rabbits 6. Students will use cover illustrations of rabbit stories to create their own. 7. Students will browse the library for stories and/or books for more rabbit stories. The following video can be used to demonstrate how rabbits are born, but it may not be appropriate for some children. Use discretion. Watch "Rabbit giving birth-baby bunnies" on YouTubehttps://youtu.be/9ohMZF5C-i8
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PORCH STORIES: "Where Is My Big Toe?"

PORCH STORIES: "Where Is My Big Toe?"

A Story is a Great Way to Engage Students. This story is an old one that was handed down through many generations, told usually while sitting on a front or back porch. The goal for this lesson is to allow students to discover the role language, math, history, science, and art have in storytelling and to get them to create their own stories using skills they learn in the classroom.
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Pennies and Dimes

Pennies and Dimes

Goal: This unit teaches students in grades K-1 (2-4 remedial) about ones, tens, hundreds, etc. Objectives: 1. Students will understand that ten pennies are equal to one dime or ten cents. 2. Students will make and defend choices regarding spending and saving. 3. Students will generalize the relationship between pennies and dimes to that between dimes and dollars, pennies and nickels, and nickels and dollars. 4. Student inquiry questions and discussion will be used to determine student understanding and need for individualized instruction when applicable. 5. Students' knowledge will be assessed before and after activities using open-ended questions and friendly debates. (NOTE: GRADES 2-4, use dimes and dollars)
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