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Follow paper friendly resources on instagram: Paperfriendlyresourcesuk These resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Follow paper friendly resources on instagram: Paperfriendlyresourcesuk These resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-Types of reproduction-B13.1
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AQA new specification-Types of reproduction-B13.1

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Types of reproduction lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.1 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 196-197. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should understand that meiosis leads to non-identical cells being formed while mitosis leads to identical cells being formed. Sexual reproduction involves the joining (fusion) of male and female gametes: • sperm and egg cells in animals • pollen and egg cells in flowering plants. In sexual reproduction there is mixing of genetic information which leads to variety in the offspring. The formation of gametes involves meiosis. Asexual reproduction involves only one parent and no fusion of gametes. There is no mixing of genetic information. This leads to genetically identical offspring (clones). Only mitosis is involved. Biology only-6.1.3 Advantages of sexual reproduction: • produces variation in the offspring • if the environment changes variation gives a survival advantage by natural selection • natural selection can be speeded up by humans in selective breeding to increase food production. Advantages of asexual reproduction: • only one parent needed • more time and energy efficient as do not need to find a mate • faster than sexual reproduction • many identical offspring can be produced when conditions are favourable Good luck with your lesson!
Pearson BTEC -Sample assessment material - Unit 1 Principles and Applications of Science I
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Pearson BTEC -Sample assessment material - Unit 1 Principles and Applications of Science I

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Attached is the sample assessment material on UNIT 1 For the NEW (2016) BTEC applied science specification. I have given my students each a copy of the sample paper (w/o mark scheme) for an open book assessment, in preparation for their mocks but you can use it is as a class test. For ease of use i converted the PDF file into a word document which i have also attached. It was very fiddly to find this on the pearson website and i dislike editing pdf documents so i hope it has saved you some hassle. Please leave a review to let me know if it was useful or how you used it in your lesson.
AQA new specification-Principles of hormonal control-B11.1
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AQA new specification-Principles of hormonal control-B11.1

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Principles of hormonal control lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and practice questions with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 5.3.1 Relevant chapter: B11 Hormonal coordination. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 160-161. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the principles of hormonal coordination and control by the human endocrine system. The endocrine system is composed of glands which secrete chemicals called hormones directly into the blood stream. The blood carries the hormone to a target organ where it produces an effect. Compared to the nervous system the effects are slower but act for longer. The pituitary gland in the brain is a ‘master gland’ which secretes several hormones into the blood in response to body conditions. These hormones in turn act on other glands to stimulate other hormones to be released to bring about effects. Students should be able to identify the position of the following on a diagram of the human body: • pituitary gland • pancreas • thyroid • adrenal gland • ovary • testes.
AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4
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AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4

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DNA and the genome lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.4 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 202-203. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the structure of DNA and define genome. The genetic material in the nucleus of a cell is composed of a chemical called DNA. DNA is a polymer made up of two strands forming a double helix. The DNA is contained in structures called chromosomes. A gene is a small section of DNA on a chromosome. Each gene codes for a particular sequence of amino acids, to make a specific protein. The genome of an organism is the entire genetic material of that organism. The whole human genome has now been studied and this will have great importance for medicine in the future. Students should be able to discuss the importance of understanding the human genome. This is limited to the: • search for genes linked to different types of disease • understanding and treatment of inherited disorders • use in tracing human migration patterns from the past.
Pearson BTEC New specification-Applied science-Unit 1-C1 complete bundle
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Pearson BTEC New specification-Applied science-Unit 1-C1 complete bundle

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This bundle includes the BTEC Physics C1-unit for the new Pearson BTEC applied science specification. C1-Working with Waves. Everything you need to teach the C1 module has been included in this bundle. All lessons have been created in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 25% by purchasing this bundle. Lesson 1-Introduction to waves Lesson 2-Displacement and phase difference Lesson 3-Longitudinal and transverse waves Lesson 4-Diffraction gratings and path difference Lesson 5-Quantum physics-photon Lesson 6-Emission spectra Lesson 7-Stationary waves and resonance Lesson 8-Musical instruments
AQA new specification-Infertility treatments-B11.8
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AQA new specification-Infertility treatments-B11.8

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Infertility treatments lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and practice questions with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. *Note-For higher tier only* AQA spec link:5.3.6 Relevant chapter: B11.8-Infertility treatments . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 174-175. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the use of hormones in modern reproductive technologies to treat infertility. This includes giving FSH and LH in a ‘fertility drug’ to a woman. She may then become pregnant in the normal way. In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) treatment: • IVF involves giving a mother FSH and LH to stimulate the maturation of several eggs. • The eggs are collected from the mother and fertilised by sperm from the father in the laboratory. • The fertilised eggs develop into embryos. • At the stage when they are tiny balls of cells, one or two embryos are inserted into the mother’s uterus (womb). Although fertility treatment gives a woman the chance to have a baby of her own: • it is very emotionally and physically stressful • the success rates are not high • it can lead to multiple births which are a risk to both the babies and the mother.
AQA new specification-DNA structure and protein synthesis-B13.5
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AQA new specification-DNA structure and protein synthesis-B13.5

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DNA structure and protein synthesis lessons created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). NB: BIOLOGY ONLY. I taught this topic in two lessons as it's a topic that's a difficult concept and can be taught effectively as opposed to being rushed. This resource is designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheets and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.5 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 204-205. Students should be able to describe DNA as a polymer made from four different nucleotides. Each nucleotide consists of a common sugar and phosphate group with one of four different bases attached to the sugar. DNA contains four bases, A, C, G and T. A sequence of three bases is the code for a particular amino acid. The order of bases controls the order in which amino acids are assembled to produce a particular protein. The long strands of DNA consist of alternating sugar and phosphate sections. Attached to each sugar is one of the four bases. The DNA polymer is made up of repeating nucleotide units. (HT only) Students should be able to: •• recall a simple description of protein synthesis •• explain simply how the structure of DNA affects the protein made •• describe how genetic variants may influence phenotype: a) in coding DNA by altering the activity of a protein: and b) in non-coding DNA by altering how genes are expressed. (HT only) In the complementary strands a C is always linked to a G on the opposite strand and a T to an A. (HT only) Students are not expected to know or understand the structure of mRNA, tRNA, or the detailed structure of amino acids or proteins. (HT only) Students should be able to explain how a change in DNA structure may result in a change in the protein synthesised by a gene. (HT only) Proteins are synthesised on ribosomes, according to atemplate. Carrier molecules bring specific amino acids to add to the growing protein chain in the correct order. (HT only) When the protein chain is complete it folds up to form a unique shape. This unique shape enables the proteins to do their job as enzymes, hormones or forming structures in the body such as collagen.
AQA new specification-Vaccination-B6.1
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AQA new specification-Vaccination-B6.1

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Vaccination lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher tier class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 4.3.1.7 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating disease. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 98-99 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain how vaccination will prevent illness in an individual, and how the spread of pathogens can be reduced by immunising a large proportion of the population. Vaccination involves introducing small quantities of dead or inactive forms of a pathogen into the body to stimulate the white blood cells to produce antibodies. If the same pathogen re-enters the body the white blood cells respond quickly to produce the correct antibodies, preventing infection. Students do not need to know details of vaccination schedules and side effects associated with specific vaccines.
AQA new specification-Making the most of photosynthesis-HT ONLY-B8.4
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AQA new specification-Making the most of photosynthesis-HT ONLY-B8.4

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Making the most of photosynthesis lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class and HIGHER TIER ONLY students. You will require access to computers/tablets for this lesson as it is heavily research based. You may decide to set this part of the spec as homework although my students thoroughly enjoyed designing the most affordable greenhouse. * NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. Enjoy this lesson for free as a token of appreciation for all the hard work you've done this term :) AQA spec link: 4.4.1.2 Relevant chapter: B8 Photosynthesis. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 128-129 Students are required to know the following; Limiting factors are important in the economics of enhancing the conditions in greenhouses to gain the maximum rate of photosynthesis whilst still maintaining profit.
AQA new specification-Dialysis worksheet-B12.4
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AQA new specification-Dialysis worksheet-B12.4

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This worksheet requires students to complete unlabelled diagrams using the AQA Biology textbook (page 188-189). This resource has been created to support the lesson on dialysis (check it out). *Top tip-print 2 copies to 1 A4 page to save printing*. AQA spec link: 5.3.3 People who suffer from kidney failure may be treated by using kidney dialysis. Students should know the basic principles of the operation of a dialysis machine.
AQA new specification-Heart dissection practical-B4.3
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AQA new specification-Heart dissection practical-B4.3

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This is one of my all time favourite lessons to teach, i’ve had great feedback from my students and would love to inspire more it’s free for that reason alone. Heart dissection lesson in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. This is NOT a required practical lesson. This is well worth doing with a separate science group. You may decide to do this practical before theory i’ve taught the theory in a previous lesson. AQA spec link: 4.2.2.2 Relevant chapter: B4 Organising animals and plants. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 54-55 Students are required to know the following; Students should know the structure and functioning of the human heart and lungs, including how lungs are adapted for gaseous exchange. The heart is an organ that pumps blood around the body in a double circulatory system. The right ventricle pumps blood to the lungs where gas exchange takes place. The left ventricle pumps blood around the rest of the body. Knowledge of the blood vessels associated with the heart is limited to the aorta, vena cava, pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein and coronary arteries. Knowledge of the names of the heart valves is not required.
AQA new specification-Discovering drugs-B6.3
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AQA new specification-Discovering drugs-B6.3

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Discovering drugs lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides. EDITED-PPT has been edited noticed a few spelling mistakes! Included a crossword also. AQA spec link: 3.1.9 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating diseases. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 102-103 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the process of discovery and development of potential new medicines, including preclinical and clinical testing. Traditionally drugs were extracted from plants and microorganisms. • The heart drug digitalis originates from foxgloves. • The painkiller aspirin originates from willow. • Penicillin was discovered by Alexander Fleming from the Penicillium mould. Most new drugs are synthesised by chemists in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the starting point may still be a chemical extracted from a plant.
AQA new specification-Aerobic respiration-B9.1
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AQA new specification-Aerobic respiration-B9.1

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Aerobic respiration lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video's and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.4.2.1 Relevant chapter: B9 Respiration. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 134-135 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe cellular respiration as an exothermic reaction which is continuously occurring in living cells. The energy transferred supplies all the energy needed for living processes. Respiration in cells can take place aerobically (using oxygen) or anaerobically (without oxygen), to transfer energy. Students should be able to compare the processes of aerobic and anaerobic respiration with regard to the need for oxygen, the differing products and the relative amounts of energy transferred. Organisms need energy for: •• chemical reactions to build larger molecules •• movement •• keeping warm. Aerobic respiration is represented by the equation: glucose + oxygen carbon dioxide + water Students should recognise the chemical symbols: C6H12O6, O2, CO2 and H2O.
AQA new specification-The artificial control of fertility (contraception)-B11.7
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AQA new specification-The artificial control of fertility (contraception)-B11.7

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The artificial control of fertility (contraception) lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video and practice questions (homework) with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link:5.3.5 Relevant chapter: B11.7-The artificial control of fertility . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 172-173. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to evaluate the different hormonal and non-hormonal methods of contraception. Fertility can be controlled by a variety of hormonal and non-hormonal methods of contraception. These include: • oral contraceptives that contain hormones to inhibit FSH production so that no eggs mature • injection, implant, or skin patch of slow release progesterone to inhibit the maturation and release of eggs for a number of months or years • barrier methods such as condoms and diaphragms which prevent the sperm reaching an egg • intrauterine devices which prevent the implantation of an embryo or release a hormone • spermicidal agents which kill or disable sperm • abstaining from intercourse when an egg may be in the oviduct • surgical methods of male and female sterilisation.
AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6
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AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6

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Hormones and menstrual cycle lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and practice questions with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. *Note-For higher tier only* AQA spec link:5.3.4 Relevant chapter: B11 -Hormonal coordination . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 170-171. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the interactions of FSH, oestrogen, LH and progesterone, in the control of the menstrual cycle. Students should be able to extract and interpret data from graphs showing hormone levels during the menstrual cycle.
AQA new specification-Removing waste products-B12.2
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AQA new specification-Removing waste products-B12.2

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Removing waste products lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations and worksheet. AQA spec link: 5.3.3 Relevant chapter: B12.2-Removing waste products . ( Note: This topic is for BIOLOGY only not for combined science students). AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 184-185 *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the effect on cells of osmotic changes in body fluids. Water leaves the body via the lungs during exhalation. Water, ions, and urea are lost from the skin in sweat. There is no control over water, ion, or urea loss by the lungs or skin. Excess water, ions, and urea are removed via the kidneys in the urine. If body cells lose or gain too much water by osmosis they do not function efficiently. The digestion of proteins from the diet results in excess amino acids which need to be excreted safely. In the liver these amino acids are deaminated to form ammonia. Ammonia is toxic and so it is immediately converted to urea for safe excretion.
AQA new specification-Plant responses and using plant hormones-B11.9-B11.10
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AQA new specification-Plant responses and using plant hormones-B11.9-B11.10

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This lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). I taught this lesson after the required germination practical. Includes: slide animations, embedded video and practice questions with mark scheme. This resource is for separates ONLY. *NOTE-using plant hormones-Higher tier only* AQA spec link: 5.4.1, 5.4.2 Relevant chapter: B11.9/10- AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 176-179 *The new specification requires students to know the following; Plants produce hormones to coordinate and control growth and responses: to light, phototropism; and gravity, gravitropism (geotropism). Unequal distributions of auxin cause unequal growth rates in plant roots and shoots. Gibberellins are important in initiating seed germination. Ethene controls cell division and ripening of fruits. The mechanisms of how gibberellins and ethene work are not required. Students should be able to describe the effects of some plant hormones and the different ways people use them to control plant growth. Plant growth hormones are used in agriculture and horticulture. Auxins are used as: • as weed killers • as rooting powders • for promoting growth in tissue culture. Ethene is used in the food industry to control ripening of fruit during storage and transport. Gibberellins can be used to: • end seed dormancy • promote flowering • increase fruit size.
AQA new specification-Controlling body temperature (Thermoregulation)-B12
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AQA new specification-Controlling body temperature (Thermoregulation)-B12

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Thermoregulation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). This is a printer friendly resource it includes an: embedded video, slide animations and a mini exam question. AQA spec link: 5.2.4 Relevant chapter: B12-Homeostasis in action. ( Note: This topic is for BIOLOGY only not for combined science students). AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 182-183 *The new specification requires students to know the following; Body temperature is monitored andcontrolled by the thermoregulatory centre in the brain. The thermoregulatory centre contains receptors sensitive to the temperature of the blood. The skin contains temperature receptorsand sends nervous impulses to the thermoregulatory centre. If the body temperature is too high, blood vessels dilate (vasodilation) and sweat is produced from the sweat glands.Both these mechanisms cause a transfer of energy from the skin to the environment. If the body temperature is too low, blood vessels constrict (vasoconstriction), sweating stops, and skeletal muscles contract (shiver). Students should be able to explain how these mechanisms lower or raise body temperature in a given context.
AQA new specification-mitosis and meiosis past paper questions-B2, B12/B13
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AQA new specification-mitosis and meiosis past paper questions-B2, B12/B13

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I have designed a mitosis and meiosis revision exam question pack, total marks /20. Contains a range of short and longer answer questions also requires students to interpret diagrams. This is a great piece of homework or mini class test, that can allow you to determine whether your students can distinguish between these two processes. I've attached the mark scheme separately as it's a great self/peer-assessed activity (reduce the marking load).