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Marnti Warrajanga – A walk together

Marnti Warrajanga – A walk together

Explore milestones of the Indigenous journey of democracy in Australia and consider their relevance to today. The information and activities support the online exhibition - www.marnti-warajanga.moadoph.gov.au/ This resource contains background information, discussion questions and class activities to enhance student learning and engagement with the Marnti warajanga – a walk together exhibition. Deceased person’s warning: Please note: Indigenous Australians are advised that this exhibition may contain images and voices of deceased persons.

By MoADLearning

Where I Belong Booklet

Where I Belong Booklet

This is written with Australian teachers in mind but can be used by all cultures. This resource makes up an 18 page booklet for children to learn about where they belong and to learn about others. Australian Curriculum—Foundation Year Humanities and Social Sciences Personal and family histories ACHHK001 and ACHHK002 The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity - Children develop knowledgeable and confident self identities Outcome 2: Children are connected with and contribute to their world - Children respond to diversity with respect

By TeachEzy

The Value of Sports: Unifying a Community - Lesson Plan & Film

The Value of Sports: Unifying a Community - Lesson Plan & Film

Students watch a film, "I am Yup’ik" by Daniele Anastasion and Nathan Golon, about a 16-year-old basketball player from the tiny village of Toksook Bay in Alaska. The film explores the power of basketball, which unites the community and creates hope and pride throughout the young team, family members, and the community-at-large. In this lesson, students explore the themes of identity, resilience, and youth awareness and empowerment. In a class discussion, students make a list of the main character’s struggles and challenges and discuss the qualities and characteristics of the Yup’ik culture. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story. English and Spanish versions of the lesson plan are available for download.

By Global_Oneness_Project

The Education of Little Tree Reading Comprehension

The Education of Little Tree Reading Comprehension

‘Gramma said when you come on something good, first thing to do is share it with whoever you can find; that way, the good spreads out where no telling it will go. Which is right.’ Little Tree narrates his own story, the tale of a unique upbringing in the near-wilderness in the 1930’s with his Cherokee grandparents as loving teachers. ‘The Education of Little Tree’ by Forrest Carter is a book that many readers turn to again and again. It is suitable for students age 11 and up who are ready to read about a time and lifestyle that differ from their own, and are able to take an interest in larger, challenging themes of life (the passage of time, spiritual beliefs, the natural world, money and government affairs, history, etc.) This eBook contains reading comprehension sheets to go with the novel. (Still protected by copyright, the book must be purchased or borrowed separately.) For each chapter there are three short assignments: 1) to summarize a lesson learned from the chapter 2) to examine the language used in the chapter 3) to explain how a suggested ‘main theme’ is relevant to the chapter. WARNING: The story does not paint a flattering picture of the Christian religion, and students who are Christian should be prepared; parents should read the book first, to be sure that their student is ready for this material. It also contains swear words and references to drinking alcohol, among other mature themes. The novel is presented as an autobiography, but it is a work of fiction.

By canadianwinter

Essay Writing: Survival & Rescue

Essay Writing: Survival & Rescue

Compare and contrast! Here are two true stories of survival and rescue. With detailed guidelines suggesting how to proceed, the student will read the texts, choose an essay topic from several suggested, take notes, organise those notes, and write an essay. This assignment will take at least one week to complete. Stories: Tracks In The Bush An Australian ranch-worker goes missing, and three Europeans, along with six blacks, trek through the bush to rescue him. The tracking abilities of the blacks consistently astonish the narrator. He also describes the intense natural surroundings and the challenges, on a human level, that are faced by all involved. The Marvellous Ice-Drift of Captain Tyson This early attempt to reach the North Pole failed. The voyage nonetheless left its mark on history when the captain and crew were forced to abandon ship and live on an ice floe for 196 days in the middle of the Arctic winter. German sailors, an American cook, and a group of Inuit faced deadly conditions together. Under the leadership of Captain George E. Tyson, not one person perished. Note: To the best of my understanding the use of the word ‘black’ to refer to the indigenous peoples of Australia is preferable to them to the word ‘Aborigine’. Thus, the original term has been left unaltered in the text. If I am mistaken and have caused offense, please let me know! TIP! This may be a good choice for a student with an interest in outdoor adventures such as hiking, camping or rock-climbing.

By canadianwinter

Naya Nuki: A True Story (Reading Comprehension)

Naya Nuki: A True Story (Reading Comprehension)

Naya Nuki is an excellent adventure and survival novel based on true and remarkable events. It is suitable for students age 9 and up. The main character is a real person, a Shoshoni girl who quite incredibly escaped capture by an enemy tribe and made her way alone on foot back to her family. The book relates how she successfully journeyed 1000 miles (just over 1609 kilometres) across what is now the northern United States. She safely navigated a wide variety of terrains, found food, coped with wild animals, avoided capture by hostile tribes, and fended of loneliness. Her story is known thanks to a surprising coincidence – she was best friends with the renowned Sacajawea. The story of Naya Nuki has been retold by Kenneth Thomasma, an expert on wilderness survival. It is a good choice for young readers because the descriptions of wilderness and survival tactics within it are accurate. In addition, Naya Nuki is portrayed as a brave, resourceful and inspiring person. Her story is uplifting and interesting. Contents • reading comprehension questions for each of 15 chapters and the epilogue • images of a buffalo hides for each chapter, both small and large, labelled and plain • instructions for multiple ways to use both the questions and the hides A map showing Naya Nuki’s route is included in the published book, which must be purchased or borrowed separately as it is protected by copyright. Contact information for the author is included which will enable you to purchase the book at a reduced rate, procure signed copies, and enjoy free shipping!

By canadianwinter

iPad Card Sorts: American West

iPad Card Sorts: American West

These outstanding resources have been written and field tested in the classroom by experienced teachers using the Thinking Kit software for the iPad. These iPad card sorts cover the key topic of the American West and are designed to fun, engaging and used by the full spectrum of learners. To find out more, click on each resource for a full description of its aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and how to use it with your students. If you like these resources then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

iPad Card Sort: How did Native Americans survive on the Great Plains?

iPad Card Sort: How did Native Americans survive on the Great Plains?

This outstanding iPad card sort has been designed to help students understand how Native Americans survived on the Great Plains? It can be used as a starter, plenary, revision, homework or assessment activity and is part of a series that I have uploaded on the American West. When you download this resource you will receive a hard copy of the card sort as well as a PowerPoint with the aims, objectives, instructions, task codes and the password you will need to activate the activity on https://www.thinking-kit.com/. The resource includes seven challenges and their matching solutions that need to be matched up. Once complete students can then discuss and feedback their answers before saving them into a PDF version which can be saved, submitted for marking or printed off. You can get your students to extend their answers further by prioritising the problems by placing them into their order of importance. The final result should make an excellent plan for writing an extended answer on this topic. When you download the hard copy you will receive a single sheet, Microsoft Word document that you can easily customise. The document includes aims, instructions and seven challenges that Native Americans faced and the matching solutions that they came up with. Once students have cut out the cards and correctly sorted them under the heading cards for challenges and solutions, they can extend their understanding further by sorting them into their order of importance before sticking them into their books and attempting the extended question. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: What was the American West? Know: What challenges faced Native Americans on the Great Plains? Understand: How did the Plains Indians overcome these challenges? Analyse: How suited was the lifestyle of the Native Americans to their environment? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: What challenges faced the Plains Indians? Explain: How did Native Americans adapt to meet these challenges? Analyse: How successfully did Native Americans adapt to suit the challenges in their environment? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

iPad Card Sort: What were Native American attitudes towards warfare?

iPad Card Sort: What were Native American attitudes towards warfare?

This great iPad card sort is designed as a quick kinaesthetic, collaborative exercise, which can be used as either a plenary or mini plenary on this topic. It has been created as part of a series on the American West which can be downloaded from my TES shop. When you download this resource you will receive a hard copy of the card sort as well as a PowerPoint with the aims, objectives, instructions, task codes and the password you will need to activate the activity on https://www.thinking-kit.com/. The resource includes 8 statements that can be dragged and dropped onto their matching headings. Once complete students can then discuss and feedback their answers before saving them into a PDF version which can be saved, submitted for marking or printed off. This resource the makes an excellent plan for writing an extended answer on this topic. When you download the hard copy of the card sort, you will receive a fully customisable Microsoft word document, which includes nine key ideas associated with Native American warfare with their definitions mixed up. You could cut these out and keep them in an envelop or just give out this single sheet and give your students 10 minutes to cut them, sort them, peer assess their results and then stick them in their books. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The American West Know: What were the key features and weapons of Native American warfare? Understand: Why did warriors count coup and display feathers and scalps? Evaluate: How did Native American beliefs affect their attitude towards warfare? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: The key features of Native American warfare? Explain: Why did warriors count coup and display feathers and scalps? Evaluate: How did Native American beliefs affect their attitude towards warfare? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Aboriginal Identity -Research an Indigenous Australian

Aboriginal Identity -Research an Indigenous Australian

This resource supports students to research an Indigenous Australian and make a PowerPoint presentation (or other format) about their research. A selection of famous Indigenous Australians from a range of fields are provided for initial discussion. A 'questions to answer'page is provided to scaffold the student's research. A modelled example about fast bowler Eddie Gilbert is also provided.

By martinesmith81

The first Australians and the settlers: An exposition writing prompt

The first Australians and the settlers: An exposition writing prompt

The first Australians and the settlers: An exposition writing prompt allows students to write an argument about whether the Aboriginal clans of the Sydney region had the right to engage in resistance against the settlers . This writing prompt uses the resistance provided by Aboriginal warriors such as Pemulwuy and Windradyne . Students are asked to respond to the question 'Some people say that Aboriginal warriors such as Pemulwuy and Windradyne were pests who had no right to fight for their land settled by the colonists'. Eight points to support the first Australians engaging in resistance are provided. Students can research this topic further using resources such as 'First Australians' series http://www.sbs.com.au/firstaustralians/ .

By martinesmith81