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Computational Thinking Bundle

Computational Thinking Bundle

Purchase my three comprehensive guides to computational thinking within one bargain package! Includes: Computational thinking for KS3 Computational thinking for KS4 Problem Solving for KS3 Also includes my popular poster resources to help promote computational thinking within your classroom
RobbotResources
Computing Skills Progression Grid KS1 and 2

Computing Skills Progression Grid KS1 and 2

A document that charts all the key skills within Computing across all age groups within KS1 and 2. Taken from the National Curriculum Document; all areas have been broken down and some expanded upon to build a progressive system of skills and abilities that children should exemplify within specific year groups in order to achieve the National Expectation within the subject. Useful for supporting planning across all year groups and for assessing the level of children at any point in the year. Covers Digital Literacy, Computer Science, Programming and E-Safety. What is also good about this document, is that its based on general equipment and resources that are free to use or stocked by almost all primary schools.
duncanjhmacdonald
Intro to Computational Thinking, Sequence & Variables with the Sandwich Robot

Intro to Computational Thinking, Sequence & Variables with the Sandwich Robot

Introductory lesson to Computational Thinking, sequences of instructions and variables, through the 'Sandwich Robot' activity. Lesson PPT includes instructions on how the teacher should perform the Sandwich Robot, questions that should be asked and introduction of key concepts. The PPT includes extensive notes which are helpful to non-specialist teachers, and timings on each slide. Also included are a 'bell work' slide to get students settled as they come in, and clear Learning Objectives.
DonDino
Kodu Game Planning Sheet

Kodu Game Planning Sheet

A planning sheet that pupils can use to plan their own platform game in Kodu. I use with my Year 5 pupils. I find that the second sheet enables them to plan out their algorithms first, as it prompts them to think about what they want each bot or object to do before then requiring them to write down their predicted algorithm.
Jamie160
Algorithm for Learning display

Algorithm for Learning display

This display uses the context of Algorithms (in the computing curriculum) to demonstrate the process of learning a new skill. This can be referred to in class to boost resilience, independent learning (the 'find help' instruction could refer to teacher, but also peers, books, research etc), but also to remind, refresh and teach the importance of the clear, precise and chronological nature of algorithms. It can also be a teaching point for decision diamonds, and how they only ever have 2 outcomes (yes, no). Included in the download is a picture of what it looks like, and the master file with all the parts separate for you to edit/ print. Let me know if it works for you! (You may need to download the free font "VCT Scream it loud 2" if you want it to edit the word doc, otherwise just use the pdf!)
PhilWickins
7 Fun Problem Solving Activities for Web Coding

7 Fun Problem Solving Activities for Web Coding

These 7 lessons were written to be delivered as part of a Scottish Qualifications Authority workshop to discuss with Computing Science teachers alternative ways to deliver web coding. They are designed to introduce fun problem solving exercises (some paper-based, some practical) and are intended to be used as lessons starters or simply to break up longer coding exercises. The lessons cover: 1. Basic Tags/Elements (h1, h2, p, title) Pupils are given cut out pieces of web content and code and must arrange the pieces on a blank A3 HTML template printout. 2. Coding Basic Tags (h1, h2, p, title) Pupils are given an HTML file with page content (as a single paragraph of text) but no elements. They must separate the text out and add tags to format the content. They are also asked to research how to create the bullet point list required by the task. 3. Division Tags (div) Similar to lesson 1 but introducing the concept of sectioning off a page using division tags. 4. Adding In-line Styles (text colour, text size, background colour, fonts) Pupils are given an HTML file, printed on A3 paper, with spaces for styles to be added. They must arrange a number of cut-out styles on the HTML file to match a screenshot of a finished page. 5. Adding In-line Styles Pupils are given an screenshot of a finished page with annotations showing colours, fonts and text-sizes used. They must edit the styles in a given file to match the finished page. 6. External Style Sheets Pupils are shown the same site implemented using in-line and then an external stylesheet. This is used to discuss the advantages of external styles. Their task this time is to edit, delete and add to the stylesheet to alter the look of the website to match a fnished example. 7. Cascading Order Pupils are given 5 A3 sheets each which shows an HTML file, a CSS file and a screenshot of the page when shown in a browser. These examples must be examined carefully and used to research the precedence order used when a browser interprets styles (i.e. In-line over-rules external, ID overrules external). This a a difficult task requiring a lot of code reading and problem solving. Level: (Beginner / Intermediate) Duration: (Around 3 to 4 hours in Total) Teaches: (See above)
snegreid
MicroBit Help Sheet (for MicroPython)

MicroBit Help Sheet (for MicroPython)

A help sheet to be used as a MicroPython command reference by students engaging in independent work with the MicroBit. Most basic MicroPython commands and statements for KS3 are listed, in a visual format not dissimilar to Scratch, so KS3 students can be nudged to relate the two ("it's basically choosing the right commands and putting them in the correct order, you just have to type them instead of dragging them").
DonDino
How to get started with running a Scratch programming class - basics

How to get started with running a Scratch programming class - basics

This is a 3 page .pdf guide to help teachers who are new to running Scratch coding classes. It covers: timing, tips when following a project or steps, how to install or open scratch to start coding, how to start a new Scratch project, how to save a project, how to open a previously saved project, and different versions of scratch. I have also added a one-slide powerpoint which you can display on the board which sets some rules for your students before the class begins.
Mrs_ICT
Computational thinking presentation - getting pupils to think how a computer thinks

Computational thinking presentation - getting pupils to think how a computer thinks

This is a 17 slide powerpoint which contains everything to explain a widely used computer programming concept in simple language and give examples of how it can be used. The lesson doesn’t require any coding so doesn’t need to be run through with computers. It includes some questions to check the pupils’ understanding and a short exercise at the end. Some of the later slides could be removed to make it more suitable for younger children. The presentation covers: what is coding ("instructions for computers"), what is an if statement, how to structure an if statement, examples of if statements in normal language, examples in Scratch programming language, using if then else statements and using if then else with many options (nested if statements).
Mrs_ICT
Computing Lesson and Resources - Year 4  - Programming Variables (Scratch)

Computing Lesson and Resources - Year 4 - Programming Variables (Scratch)

I planned and taught this for an observed lesson and was graded outstanding for the subject knowledge and progress the children made. Included is the plan, 5 scratch files, a short lesson presentation and some printable Tool-kits. Objective: To program changes in a scratch animation using variables. Children learn how to utilise conditional statements and create their own variables within an animation in scratch. The scratch files include all the blocks required for each stage of modelling. Best taught in a computer suite with a display board for direct modelling of included resources. Covers many elements of LWKS2 Computing curriculum.
duncanjhmacdonald
Scratch Hour of Code Vocabulary Jeopardy Game

Scratch Hour of Code Vocabulary Jeopardy Game

This fun and engaging Jeopardy Style Game is the perfect way to bond with your class all year long and learn scratch. I typically put the class into small groups and ask a member of the group to choose a color and number. That is the question that they have to answer. If correct they get one point. Then I move to the next group. Alternatively the whole class answers and then we tally up the points to get a winner. I run it on an interactive whiteboard but would be equally successful on a projector, computer or TV screen. Alternatively it could be run for an individual student on their own device. When you start the game press the shuffle button to randomize the questions ensuring that no game is ever the same. This means that this Jeopardy game came be used multiple times with the one class as it is different every time. Once you have unzipped the file you will find a PowerPoint Macro Show. To run the game double click the file and make sure you say "yes" to running macros. If you do not the questions will not shuffle correctly. I have tested on a PC but it should work on other devices. If this is your first time with Macros let me know by personal message and I am happy to answer all your questions. Enjoy
Kiwilander
Python Iteration L5 - Introduction to while loops

Python Iteration L5 - Introduction to while loops

From Scratch to Python - While Loops (Iteration) Lesson 5 This series of lessons will prepare all students, particularly in KS3 to develop their computational thinking skills, which is required for most KS4 qualification. It is also aimed at students aiming to sit GCSE computer science, and will support, provide a thorough and secure understanding of loops, particularly condition controlled while loop. There is adequate practise at applying skills. Starter plenary and homework activities included. This lesson is aimed at all abilities, although lower ability may require more time to process content or additional lessons to complete all tasks. Lesson objectives are extracted from the new computing curriculum in England for KS2 and KS3. Although this lesson can be taught as stand alone, students who have already used algorithms in scratch series and from scratch to python will benefit from continuity and familiarity of keywords and exercises. Students will need knowledge of how to use input and output function with knowledge of variables in python. Or alternatively purchase introduction to python - from scratch to python series. They will also need the python IDLE environment which is available to download free at https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-350/. Please feel free to email chris_vidal2000@yahoo.com for feedback or further advice.
chris_vidal