Small Basic - Entire Unit Resources (easy to use!)

Small Basic - Entire Unit Resources (easy to use!)

An entire unit of work for use with the program Small Basic suitable for Key Stage 3 (we deliver this to Year 8). It is a great (and free!) program to use if you want students to progress from block-based programming (such as Scratch) onto text-based programming. This contains: 7 lessons work, including a DIRT lesson in the middle for students to work on an area they need to improve on A full and detailed scheme of work with information about numeracy, literacy and a lesson plan for each lesson A two-part workbook (the DIRT lesson goes in between) as two separate DOC files, and the complete workbook if that is preferred. Clear extension tasks for all students in all lessons. 3 Homework worksheets Powerpoint presentations for all lessons We have had a few non-specialists in the department so this unit of work was designed to be easily accessible and clear for everyone to use - you should (hopefully!) be able to pick this up and teach it without too much preparation beyond the amount you would usually do for a lesson.
tjra
Visual Basic Password Box Tutorial

Visual Basic Password Box Tutorial

Allows toy to teach the class how to set up and use a simple Visual Basic login screen. The code for the button event can be pasted in from the work document or the .PDF version can be made available on your network if you want the class to type in manually.
maxwell01782
Introduction to programming using Small Basic - (KS2-KS3) - Lesson 2 For loops and Variables

Introduction to programming using Small Basic - (KS2-KS3) - Lesson 2 For loops and Variables

A lesson with resources for Small Basic programming, introducing the concepts of For loops and variables. This worksheet introduces simple programming concepts in a fun and visual way by using the 'Turtle' to draw shapes. I have used these lessons with Year 5, 7 and 8, and they were very popular with pupils as well as colleagues who used them in their own lessons. I think the key to success is encouraging pupils to be creative and experiment with the commands they learn in these lessons. Before you know it they will be making all sorts of shapes and discoveries of what else can be done. This could follow on from use of 'Bee-Bots' or other similar tools pupils will be familiar with from KS1, or could be used independently to get pupils interested in the use of a text-based programming language. Small Basic is a good choice of programming language for KS2 or KS3 as there are very few commands to learn, yet quite advanced programmes can be designed. Further lessons will be available that follow the style of this lesson but introduce more programming concepts including subroutines (like 'teaching' the language a new command, e.g. to make it draw a square whenever you type 'square'), and even how to interact with the mouse (e.g. draw a square wherever the mouse is clicked). I have included a PDF and Word version as you may wish to edit parts of it, and a zip file containing an example solutions to the challenges.
scalesy
Turtle Graphics - Computer Language

Turtle Graphics - Computer Language

This resource package is intended for the teaching of Turtle graphics, a drawing application based on one of the high level language known as logo. Basically, a user can control a 'turtle' to trace out shapes of varying complexity by using a number of on-screen commands. This package consists of a presentation file (slides for going through the introduction to Turtle graphics and the method to identify the commands needed) as well as a practice worksheet with solution on identifying commands for various traced-out shapes.
shashariza_jupri
Look at Me! I'm Learning to Code!

Look at Me! I'm Learning to Code!

There's no doubt that my video game and educational resources are classroom favorites with my students. It is imperative (in my mind) to connect this medium with educational ideas, for our students are in dire need of developing 21st Century Thinking Skills. In fact, according to Michael Jung (Senior Consultant at McKinsey and Company), “Our old idea is that work is defined by employers and that employees have to do whatever the employer wants . . . but actually, you would like him to come up with an interpretation that you like—he’s adding something personal—a creative element.” Research has demonstrated that the human brain does much better in the long term if it is exposed to activities such as brain teasers, logical puzzles and thinking. In fact, research has shown some of the benefits regarding such activities: • Boosts brain activity • Provides emotional satisfaction and sense of accomplishment • Enhances memory and processing speed • Helps slow the decline and reduce the risk for dementia • Improves concentration The human brain is no different than any other muscle in the human body. If an individual wants developed bicep muscles, they need to do arm curls with weights (i.e. an arm workout). Henceforth, if one wants to develop and maintain a healthy brain, it too must be allowed to exercise, which is the foundation of this guide. The videos for these activities are from the phenomenal video game, Human Resource Machine, by the Tomorrow Corporation. So, have fun and get ready for some head scratching! Note: The goal is not necessarily to get all the every challenge correct . . . you may not. Regardless, the students are exercising their brains, and thereby reaping the benefits. Keep in mind . . . 1. I buy the game. 2. I play the game. 3. I make the videos while playing the game. 4. I create the educational activities, which correlate with the game's concepts. 5. I complete the unit guide. 6. I contact and talk to the game's creators to get their blessing on promoting my guides. The key, as an educator, is to be willing to go out of one’s comfort zone and be ready to try something new and innovative. If the results mirror my own classroom, you will be pleased at the student's ability to improve their thinking and writing skills. Total Pages: 64
bdalton1209