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Population

Population

Full KS3 unit of work for Population. This unit explores World Population, from population growth to ageing populations and anti-natalist policies. All lesson are suitable for 50 minutes to 1 hour of teaching time. Includes supporting worksheets for lessons - no additional resources are required. All lessons have a starter and learning objectives. All PowerPoints in the same signature style. For more resources visit thisisgeography.co.uk Lesson sequence: 1 – World population 2 – World population distribution 3 – Population explosion 4 – Population pyramids 5 – Comparing pyramids – Brazil 6 – Impact of growing populations 7 – Ageing populations 8 – Japan 9 – The green revolution 10 – China 11 – How can we encourage more people to reproduce? 12 – Singapore and India 13 – Migration 14 – Jelly Baby population 15 - Assessment Also includes Geography Literacy mat and Geography Numeracy/Map Skills mat.
thisisgeography
Who Lives On Mount Kilimanjaro?

Who Lives On Mount Kilimanjaro?

The Chagga people have lived on the slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro for hundreds of years, they believe the mountain is holy and treat it with respect. However, since the area was given National Park status in 1970 there has been a sharp increase in hikers. With 18,000 hikers a year and 54,000 porters the Chagga people and their mountain are starting to feel the strain. The students imagine they help run a primary school in the countryside of Tanzania. Many families living in the area find it difficult to afford school uniforms, shoes, books and lunches which results is children skipping days at school or not coming at all. The students have been tasked with trying to double the attendance at the school with the aid of an additional £15,000. What would they spend this money on and why?
WillsonEducation
How do we View Migrants? - Intro to Migration/Critical Thinking Skills

How do we View Migrants? - Intro to Migration/Critical Thinking Skills

A lesson I used as an introductory lesson about migration and the different types of migrant and as a way of highlighting biases present in the media and our individual world view. Best used with new groups of students of any year 7-11 as most of the tasks are reflective and discussion based and involve random pairings and a main carousel activity. Very engaging and easy to manage lesson. Could definitely be used in a Tutor time/Citzenship lesson also and possibly for English to alert students to journalistic bias and to help them read texts more critically.
sheppard2011
Rounding numbers

Rounding numbers

The wavy line worksheets are a useful resource for children to visualise rounding numbers easier, by picturing a marble rolling backwards (rounding off) or rolling forwards (rounding up). For example, ask the pupils to find the biggest number possible that would roll back to 100, or to find the first number that would roll forwards to 200. There are wavy lines with different numbers from 100 to 10 million to allow for differentiation. There is also a task where pupils find the population of some British cities rounded to the thousand's number place. The task can be done by asking the pupils to estimate the size of the city first and then using this website to found the populations http://www.citypopulation.de/UK-Cities.html, or alternatively there is a worksheet with the populations written, if you do not want to use the website. As an additional geography task pupils could locate the cities on a map. There is also a 'How to round numbers' advice sheet. This can be printed and put in pupils' books to remind them of how to round numbers. It gives the rounding maths task a real context and links to geography.
AWalkerEducation
Kent, England

Kent, England

A collection of photos from my visits to the county of Kent, in England. This collection will be added to during my solo ocean row around the coast of Great Britain. Please leave me a review and I will send you any other resource of your choice for free (contact me: office@oceansproject.com). Check out my other resources at my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/sarah277 Let me know if you have any resource requests and I will tailor make a resource for you.
sarah277
NEW A-level Geog (human)- Contemporary Urban Environments  revision notes

NEW A-level Geog (human)- Contemporary Urban Environments revision notes

Hand-typed detailed revision notes on all topics in New AQA A level human geography contemporary urban environments (chapter 9). Notes on chapters 9.1-9.8. Content from Hodder Education, Geography A-level and AS Fourth edition text book, exam board specification and additional sources. Please note there may be some accidental typing errors.
ebrook_
Oral History: Population Movement 1750 - 1900

Oral History: Population Movement 1750 - 1900

This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying population movement 1750 - 1900. It had been field tested and refined many times and is a really fun and engaging lesson, which has a really big impact of students. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability as it includes a range of tasks and activities which can be selected in whole or part to suit your students. You will need access to You Tube in order to be able to access the song. When you download this lesson you will be able to access a Microsoft Word document which contains the lyrics to the song 'Dalesman's Litany' and PowerPoint. There is enough work to fully engage a normal class of students for at least one lesson. The PowerPoint facilitates the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, a snowballing starter. The next couple of slides set the scene and explains why Britain's population was on the move. This is followed up by two source activities which could be print off and completed as an investigation or used as part of a class discussion to help set the scene for the main activity. The next slide is a pro and con thinking skills organiser on the problems facing historians when they use oral history as evidence. This could be competed as an activity or as a plenary. I have included a completed version at the end of the presentation. The next activity involves playing the song by clicking on the hyperlink in show mode. I personally would give students a copy of the lyrics to annotate but if you are short on the photocopying budget then you can get around it by getting them in pairs or groups to write down the jobs / places that the person in the folk song has done / lived to help illustrate the impact of the changes on peoples lives.. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did Britain have an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? Know: Why was Britain’s population on the move 1750 – 1850? Understand: What factors caused this change? Evaluate: How useful is oral history as evidence about the past? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Why was Britain’s population of the move? Explain: What factors caused this change? Analyse: How useful is oral history as historical evidence? If you like this lesson then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. I have unloaded this one for free as its my favourite lesson of all time. If you wish you can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins