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Bridges (Simple Linear Sequences)

Bridges (Simple Linear Sequences)

This simple investigation helps introduce linear sequences and use of formula. Pupils are prompted to use multilink to make bridges of a fixed height, draw their bridges, and record lengths and blocks used. This leads to a linear sequence and simple formula. The extension task asks pupils to consider bridges of different lengths and heights, leading to a more difficult, but still linear, formula. This has the potential to generate class discussion covering equivalent terms, BIDMAS etc.
sjwilk
The Pirate Game (Christmas Themed)

The Pirate Game (Christmas Themed)

I have used the resource shared by 'paulcollins' and adapted it slightly. Changed some of the questions and made it Christmas themed so its more appropriate for this time of year. Also includes a special appearance by the fearsome Blackbeard and terrifying Kraken! Enjoy and Merry Christmas!
mercbenzon
Finding patterns investigations. (Square numbers)

Finding patterns investigations. (Square numbers)

This is an investigation that my children loved it. I spread it over two lessons and the first lesson I let them try to solve it however way they wish. We started with a discussion on what makes a great mathematician and decided that finding the answer isn't what makes a great mathematician but making a start and exploring is. Some children used squared paper, multilink cubes, their Maths books, tables etc. In the second lesson I showed them how it would have been easier to look for patterns and record these using a table and introduce the word 'Systematic'. This investigation can be done even if you aren't covering square numbers. The notebook also includes hinge questions to begin the lesson to elicit children EXPLAINING their learning.
sid1913
Mathematics Worksheet generator

Mathematics Worksheet generator

This spreadsheet is set up to produce nine questions for students to answer on a variety of foundation topics. The spreadsheet also generates the answers. The generate a new list simply alter week 1 for week 2 etc and a new sheet is generated. That is the numbers are replaced or a different algebraic expression is generated. The topics on this sheet include: Dividing into a given ratio Multiplying fractions together nth term of a linear sequence collection of like terms solving simple equations decimal conversions metric conversions decimal multiplication
sjcooper
Pattern Sequences -Complete Lesson

Pattern Sequences -Complete Lesson

This is a complete lesson on ‘Pattern Sequences’ that is suitable for GCSE Foundation Tier students. The lesson is designed for the new GCSE specification. The pack contains a full lesson plan, along with accompanying resources, including a student worksheet and suggested support and extension activities.
tomotoole
Fibonacci Sequence (Interactive Whiteboard Game)

Fibonacci Sequence (Interactive Whiteboard Game)

This is a fun interactive whiteboard game, created in PowerPoint, with triggered animations. All my students have loved this activity ('Sir, can we play the chain-game?'). It is enjoyable for both high and low ability – it not only familiarises students with the Fibonacci Sequence, but they also need to remember where the numbers are hidden! -- I typically use this activity as a starter and then as a plenary at the end of the lesson. It gets the whole class involved – even when it's not a students turn, they are repeating the numbers in their head and they are desperate to say where the next number is! The way that I play the game: 1. I go through the members of the sequence and ensure that the students are familiar with each of the numbers; 2. When the board is revealed, I give about 15 seconds to ‘peek’ at the uncovered board so that the students can try to learn where the first few numbers are; 3. I then call up the students one-at-a-time to try an uncover as many numbers as they can before they go wrong. NOTES: I encourage the students to call out the number that they are looking for because this reinforces the learning. This activity works very well if you get two students to play against each other – either on the interactive whiteboard or on PCs.
Maths4Everyone
Triangle Numbers (Interactive Whiteboard Game)

Triangle Numbers (Interactive Whiteboard Game)

This is a fun interactive whiteboard game, created in PowerPoint, with triggered animations. All my students have loved this activity ('Sir, can we play the chain-game?'). It is enjoyable for both high and low ability – it not only helps familiarise students with the triangle numbers, but they also need to remember where the numbers are hidden! -- I typically use this activity as a starter and then as a plenary at the end of the lesson. It gets the whole class involved – even when it's not a students turn, they are repeating the numbers in their head and they are desperate to say where the next number is! The way that I play the game: 1. I go through the members of the sequence and ensure that the students are familiar with each of the numbers; 2. When the board is revealed, I give about 15 seconds to ‘peek��� at the uncovered board so that the students can try to learn where the first few numbers are; 3. I then call up the students one-at-a-time to try an uncover as many numbers as they can before they go wrong. NOTES: I encourage the students to call out the number that they are looking for because this reinforces the learning. This activity works very well if you get two students to play against each other – either on the interactive whiteboard or on PCs.
Maths4Everyone
Square Numbers (Interactive Whiteboard Game)

Square Numbers (Interactive Whiteboard Game)

This is a fun interactive whiteboard game, created in PowerPoint, with triggered animations. All my students have loved this activity ('Sir, can we play the chain-game?'). It is enjoyable for both high and low ability – it not only reinforces the learning of the prime numbers, but students also need to remember where the numbers are hidden! - I typically use this activity as a starter and then as a plenary at the end of the lesson. It gets the whole class involved – even when it's not a students turn, they are repeating the numbers in their head and they are desperate to say where the next number is! The way that I play the game: 1. I go through the members of the sequence and ensure that the students are familiar with each of the numbers; 2. When the board is revealed, I give about 15 seconds to ‘peek’ at the uncovered board so that the students can try to learn where the first few numbers are; 3. I then call up the students one-at-a-time to try an uncover as many numbers as they can before they go wrong. NOTES: I encourage the students to call out the number that they are looking for because this reinforces the learning. This activity works very well if you get two students to play against each other – either on the interactive whiteboard or on PCs.
Maths4Everyone