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Weathering, Erosion and Deposition Notes/Drawings

Weathering, Erosion and Deposition Notes/Drawings

This lesson is designed to help engage and facilitate learning about weathering, erosion, and deposition process for students. It includes linked videos, handouts, and creative ways to assess students’ learning (blank comic strip templates).There is also Frayer model vocabulary model sheets available to help students understand and remember key vocabulary. Also includes works cited page for research. This lesson is student-centered meaning: --it allows you to become a facilitator --happier teachers --happier students --happier administrators
learningisawesomewithmrsalinas
Earth's natural resources research project

Earth's natural resources research project

A research project for students to research and gain a deeper understanding of natural resources and the current problems facing the world. Includes requirements, sample project ideas, and brainstorming topics. Standard: (iii) Energy resources are available on a renewable, nonrenewable, or indefinite basis. Understanding the origins and uses of these resources enables informed decision making. Students should consider the ethical/social issues surrounding Earth's natural energy resources, while looking at the advantages and disadvantages of their long-term uses. This lesson is student-centered meaning: --it allows you to become a facilitator --happier teachers --happier students --happier administrators
learningisawesomewithmrsalinas
Earth and Space Sciences

Earth and Space Sciences

The Earth and Space Sciences Unit contains all of the lessons from the Earth's Systems and Space Systems packets. These lessons include, "Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Water Cycle, Rock Cycle, Earth History, Seasons, Phases of the Moon, Eclipses, and Solar System." They support MS-ESS1 (Earth's Place in the Universe) and MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handouts and included answer keys work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/earth-and-space-science. Students may work individually if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handouts filled out as a group. Once students complete a handout, you may choose to discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on your style of teaching and the ability level of your students. For more information about how to get the most out of How About Science?, click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
davidhowe1385
Earth's Systems:  Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Water Cycle, Rock Cycle, Earth History

Earth's Systems: Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Water Cycle, Rock Cycle, Earth History

Lessons in the Earth Systems unit are part of a larger unit on Earth and Space Sciences or they can be purchased individually. These lessons include, "Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Water Cycle, Rock Cycle, and Earth History." They support MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handouts and included answer keys work together with videos and links found on the "How About Science?" website at http://www.howaboutscience.com/earth-and-space-science. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete a handout, you may choose to discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on your style of teaching and the ability level of your students. For more information about how to get the most out of How About Science?, click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
davidhowe1385
Earth History:  Earth and Space Sciences

Earth History: Earth and Space Sciences

This lesson is an introduction to Earth's history, its layers and how it was formed, and is part of a five-lesson series on Earth Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/earth-history. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
davidhowe1385
The Rock Cycle:  Earth and Space Sciences

The Rock Cycle: Earth and Space Sciences

This lesson is an introduction to the rock cycle and why it is important, and is part of a five-lesson series on Earth Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/rock-cycle. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?"materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
davidhowe1385
The Water Cycle:  Earth and Space Sciences

The Water Cycle: Earth and Space Sciences

This lesson is an introduction to the water cycle and why it is important, and is part of a five-lesson series on Earth Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/water-cycle. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
davidhowe1385
Earthquakes:  Earth and Space Sciences

Earthquakes: Earth and Space Sciences

This lesson is an introduction to earthquakes and tsunamis, and is part of a five-lesson series on Earth Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/earthquakes. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
davidhowe1385
Volcanoes: Earth and Space Science

Volcanoes: Earth and Space Science

This lesson is an introduction to volcanoes, and is part of a five-lesson series on Earth Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/volcanoes . Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How Abut Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
davidhowe1385
Mythbusters Video Questions: NASA Moon landing (22 Question Total)

Mythbusters Video Questions: NASA Moon landing (22 Question Total)

Video guide questions for the Mythbusters episode: Moon landing Hoax. Great to keep the students focused. Word for word from video. Link to stream episode online as well. Key included. Standards: (i) To develop a rich knowledge of science and the natural world, students must become familiar with different modes of scientific inquiry, rules of evidence, ways of formulating questions, ways of proposing explanations, and the diverse ways scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based on evidence derived from their work. (ii) Scientific investigations are conducted for different reasons. All investigations require a research question, careful observations, data gathering, and analysis of the data to identify the patterns that will explain the findings. Descriptive investigations are used to explore new phenomena such as conducting surveys of organisms or measuring the abiotic components in a given habitat. Descriptive statistics include frequency, range, mean, median, and mode. A hypothesis is not required in a descriptive investigation. On the other hand, when conditions can be controlled in order to focus on a single variable, experimental research design is used to determine causation. Students should experience both types of investigations and understand that different scientific research questions require different research designs. This lesson is student-centered meaning: --it allows you to become a facilitator --happier teachers --happier students --happier administrators
learningisawesomewithmrsalinas
Space Systems:  Seasons, Moon Phases, Eclipses, Solar System

Space Systems: Seasons, Moon Phases, Eclipses, Solar System

Lessons in the Space Systems unit are part of a larger unit on Earth and Space Sciences or they can be purchased individually. Space Systems lessons include Seasons, Phases of the Moon, Eclipses, and Solar System. They support MS-ESS1 (Earth's Place in the Universe) of the NGSS. The handouts and included answer keys work together with videos and links found http://www.howaboutscience.com/earth-and-space-science. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete a handout, you may choose to discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required, to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low, even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on your style of teaching and the ability level of your students. For more information about how to get the most out of How About Science?, click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
davidhowe1385