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Coding, Collaboration, Communication and Curriculum in Finland

Coding, Collaboration, Communication and Curriculum in Finland

Computer science nurtures problem-solving skills, logic and creativity. The world is increasingly run by software and we need more diversity among those people who are building it. Not all students will be software developers or writers, doctors or translators, but we are already surrounded by technology and even more so in the future. The main point is to provide a basic understanding of society, living environment and fields of science and thus provide equal opportunities for all the learners. Understanding how computers work and how to use them well, gives children skills and knowledge to succeed in global competition and life generally. Year 3 pupils were not only taught the basics of coding, but they were taught to teach other classes the magic of coding. They have taught around 200 other children and teachers in Finland and India (via video) the Magic of Coding. You can learn more about the Coding Ambassadors here or email for an online course including videos and lesson plan for collaborative coding lessons.
pipsa37
Python Programming - I CAN Statements

Python Programming - I CAN Statements

These I Can statements are perfect to guide your students to develop the necessary skills when learning to code/program using Python. The teacher or the student can tick off each I Can statement once they have demonstrated evidence for them. I Can statements fall under the following 4 categories: • Criteria 1: Planning • Criteria 2: Skills Development • Criteria 3: Explanation of Code • Criteria 4: Efficiency of Code
balsamgr8
Computational Thinking and the Digital Competence Framework

Computational Thinking and the Digital Competence Framework

My latest poster shows how the understanding of Computational Thinking underpins all concepts of the Digital Competence Framework (DCF). I have given examples of how each concept can be applied to primary strands of the framework. Feel free to download and use as part of CPD sessions! ***Please leave a review!***
RobbotResources
Algorithms, Maths & micro:bit: 5 fun coding activities

Algorithms, Maths & micro:bit: 5 fun coding activities

5 fun activities exploring the micro:bit, mathematics, and algorithm creation in Python and JavaScript Blocks. This short activity booklet explores the use of computing in order to calculate mathematical constants and carry out advanced mathematical functions. This could be used as an introduction to algorithms or mathematics & computing. In these activities we will use Python and JavaScript Blocks to calculate Pi & e, as well as creating a function to calculate factorials. Along the way we will learn a number of key skills: - Introducing & breaking down problems and algorithms - Solving and re-arranging equations - Real-world use of computing - Introduction to mathematical constants - Coding in Python & JavaScript Blocks - Utilising key equations for geometry & shapes - Memory issues & efficiency - Coding Skills: - Variables - Loops - Conditions - Advanced mathematical functions
rlowe0008
Scratch Games Design for Computer Science

Scratch Games Design for Computer Science

This is a whole unit of work with a variety of different lessons which aims to take students from basic understanding of the Scratch coding environment to students who develop games. Differentiated resource with clear instructions and challenging advanced activities for students who are capable
PaperAirplane
KS2 / KS3 Scratch superunit - introduction and follow-up unit

KS2 / KS3 Scratch superunit - introduction and follow-up unit

This bundle contains two units of work for Scratch, including at least 14 lessons in total (some may take longer, depending on programming speed). It can be broken down into two units, or potentially completed in one go. I have completed these with the same students over two years - the introductory unit in Y5 and then the second unit in Y6. However, this could be used with older children with little Scratch experience. The lessons conatined are as follows: Unit 1 Introduction to Scratch - algorithms Joke - sequencing Disco - sequencing / iteration Etch-a-sketch - controlling sprites Maze - Selection / iteration Assessment Unit 2 Flowcharts - algorithms Chatbot - sequencing / selection Scrolling maze - variables Falling fruit - indefinite iteration / variables Breakout - Variables / subroutines Rock, Paper, Scissors - Definite iteration / subroutines Assessment
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Scratch intermediate unit

KS2 / KS3 Scratch intermediate unit

This unit is designed to be used after the initial Scratch unit, and contains lessons on flowcharts, sequencing, selection, iteration, variables and subroutines. The games that will be made through this unit include: A chatbot A scrolling maze Falling Fruit game Breakout Rock, paper, scissors Following the flowcharts lesson, the students will complete the other lessons to create the above programs, and then finish with an assessment. The assessment says Y6 at the top as this was the year group I have used it with, but that is because my Y5s completed the introductory unit and so moved onto this in Y6. However, this could be used for KS2 or KS3, depending on programming and Scratch experience.
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Scratch Assessment

KS2 / KS3 Scratch Assessment

This assessment is similar but more advanced than the introductory Scratch unit assessment in my shop, and includes questions on subroutines and variables as well as algorithms, sequencing, selection and iteration. This is aimed at students who have completed two units of Scratch.
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Rock paper scissors tutorial - subroutines

KS2 / KS3 Rock paper scissors tutorial - subroutines

This lesson is for students who have completed the introductory unit of Scratch, or have other experience in Scratch or other programming languages. The lesson focuses on creating a game using subroutines, and includes a presentation which introduces the task, the complete code for demonstration purposes and starter code for the students. There is also a tutorial for the students to complete the creation of the game following the demonstration.
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Scratch Breakout Game - subroutines

KS2 / KS3 Scratch Breakout Game - subroutines

This resource is for students who have experience in Scratch or other programming languages, including those who have completed the introductory unit of Scratch. The resource contains a powerpoint presentation to introduce subroutines, and a tutorial for students to create the game. It also includes the full game for demonstration and debugging purposes.
MrHawes8
KS2 / KS3 Scratch Falling Fruit Game

KS2 / KS3 Scratch Falling Fruit Game

This lesson is based around using indefinite iteration in Scratch, through creating a game where the player catches randomly falling objects. This resource includes the full game code, a presentation to introduce indefinite iteration, and a tutorial for students to create the game.
MrHawes8