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Application of Computational Thinking - Create an Interactive Story

Application of Computational Thinking - Create an Interactive Story

This unit of work introduces year 7 students to the concepts of computational thinking and logical thinking. It is split into three fully differentiated sections: 1. Design an interactive story using a flowchart to identify the key decision points within your story. 2. Create an interactive story using PowerPoint, hyperlinking the slides to the correct locations. 3. Test and evaluate your story and make improvements where required. I have included some slides to provide additional assistance, for example hyperlinking auto shapes, removing the on mouse click advancements, etc. Alongside developing computational thinking skills, this unit is also an opportunity for students to develop their graphic design skills. I have also included an example interactive story so students can get an idea of what they could create themselves, while considering what they could make even better themselves. This resource is a perfect continuation from my Introduction Computational Thinking for KS3 resource! ***Please Leave a Review***
RobbotResources
An Autumn Coding Activity with Scratch

An Autumn Coding Activity with Scratch

A computing lesson plan and associated resources for KS2 children programming an autumn leaf catching game with Scratch. Includes step-by-step lesson plan, support materials and pre-written program files. More free primary computing lessons and resources available at www.icompute-uk.com
iCompute
Poster - Computational Thinking Vocabulary

Poster - Computational Thinking Vocabulary

Computational thinking is full of complicated words. This poster was created to help students pronounce the four elements of computational thinking (Decomposition, Pattern Recognition, Abstraction and Algorithmic Design) phonetically. I have included both PNG and JPEG versions. ***Please leave a review!***
RobbotResources
Application of Computational Thinking - Coding Classic Games

Application of Computational Thinking - Coding Classic Games

My popular twitter poster is available for download here! This poster gives an example of how computational thinking can be used to convert classic games such as 'rock, paper, scissors' and 'noughts and crosses' into algorithms. Try out in your classroom! I have included JPEG and PNG versions of the poster. ***Please leave a review!***
RobbotResources
Computational Thinking Bundle

Computational Thinking Bundle

Purchase my three comprehensive guides to computational thinking within one bargain package! Includes: Computational thinking for KS3 Computational thinking for KS4 Problem Solving for KS3 Also includes my popular poster resources to help promote computational thinking within your classroom
RobbotResources
Key Stage 2 Computing Curriculum - Introduction to Scratch

Key Stage 2 Computing Curriculum - Introduction to Scratch

Document linking Key Stage 2 computing curriculum requirements with units of work. Scratch introductory lesson written by Key Stage 3/4 teacher for local primary school struggling with the new computing curriculum terminology. Teaching the lessons over the Autumn term 2017, so more lessons will be added as created. I use Scratch offline editor, but this could be done on the online version too.
Pipjen77
Y9 & GCSE - Intro to Computational Thinking, with the Sandwich Robot

Y9 & GCSE - Intro to Computational Thinking, with the Sandwich Robot

Introductory lesson to Computational Thinking, sequences of instructions and variables, through the 'Sandwich Robot' activity. Lesson PPT includes instructions on how the teacher should perform the Sandwich Robot, questions that should be asked and introduction of key concepts. The PPT includes extensive notes which are helpful to non-specialist teachers, and timings on each slide. Also included are a 'bell work' slide to get students settled as they come in, and clear Learning Objectives.
CompuTeach
7 Fun Problem Solving Activities for Web Coding

7 Fun Problem Solving Activities for Web Coding

These 7 lessons were written to be delivered as part of a Scottish Qualifications Authority workshop to discuss with Computing Science teachers alternative ways to deliver web coding. They are designed to introduce fun problem solving exercises (some paper-based, some practical) and are intended to be used as lessons starters or simply to break up longer coding exercises. The lessons cover: 1. Basic Tags/Elements (h1, h2, p, title) Pupils are given cut out pieces of web content and code and must arrange the pieces on a blank A3 HTML template printout. 2. Coding Basic Tags (h1, h2, p, title) Pupils are given an HTML file with page content (as a single paragraph of text) but no elements. They must separate the text out and add tags to format the content. They are also asked to research how to create the bullet point list required by the task. 3. Division Tags (div) Similar to lesson 1 but introducing the concept of sectioning off a page using division tags. 4. Adding In-line Styles (text colour, text size, background colour, fonts) Pupils are given an HTML file, printed on A3 paper, with spaces for styles to be added. They must arrange a number of cut-out styles on the HTML file to match a screenshot of a finished page. 5. Adding In-line Styles Pupils are given an screenshot of a finished page with annotations showing colours, fonts and text-sizes used. They must edit the styles in a given file to match the finished page. 6. External Style Sheets Pupils are shown the same site implemented using in-line and then an external stylesheet. This is used to discuss the advantages of external styles. Their task this time is to edit, delete and add to the stylesheet to alter the look of the website to match a fnished example. 7. Cascading Order Pupils are given 5 A3 sheets each which shows an HTML file, a CSS file and a screenshot of the page when shown in a browser. These examples must be examined carefully and used to research the precedence order used when a browser interprets styles (i.e. In-line over-rules external, ID overrules external). This a a difficult task requiring a lot of code reading and problem solving. Level: (Beginner / Intermediate) Duration: (Around 3 to 4 hours in Total) Teaches: (See above)
snegreid