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Forgiving the Unforgivable PPT

Forgiving the Unforgivable PPT

This PowerPoint presentation is the second of three lessons focussing on Forgiving the unforgivable, exploring the story of Kemal Pervanic and his experiences of incarceration in the Bosnian War. For the accompanying lesson plans and student booklet (plus resources for the other lessons) please visit: Within this lesson students will learn about Kemal’s experience in the Omarska camp and the reality that he personally knew many of his guards and interrogators as his teachers, friends and neighbours. Students will explore his journey towards forgiveness and the impact this had on him. They will learn about Kemal’s project in Bosnia to unite young people of all nationalities. The previous lesson introduces Kemal and his story. The third and final lesson explores the story of Mary Blewitt who lost 50 members of her family in the Rwandan Genocide. This resource can be used within Citizenship, Religious Studies and PSHE or within tutor time discussions or drop down days. Each lesson is designed to last approx one hour. Due to the content of this lesson, it should be facilitated by a staff member who knows the class well and can direct responses and use prompt questions to encourage healthy discussion, whilst maintaining a safe environment for all young people. The resources are available for free download at and include a lesson plan, student booklet and powerpoint for each lesson. In addition The Forgiveness Project organises speakers in schools for assembly, within class time or for special events. Please contact for further information.
anna206
Why do people forgive? PPT

Why do people forgive? PPT

This PowerPoint presentation is the first of three lessons focussing on **Why do people forgive? ** For the accompanying lesson plans and student booklet (plus resources for the other lessons) please visit: Designed for students in YR9 and above, this lesson starts to explore the reasons why people may choose a path of forgiveness through the real-life story of Mary Foley, who lost her child in a violent attack at a 16th birthday party. The lesson enables students to discuss the benefits of forgiveness on people’s physical and emotional well-being and how empathy can influence people’s ability to forgive. The two lessons that follow, further explore compassion and empathy, introducing students to Barry Mizen whose Son Jimmy was killed in his local community. Students look at Desmond Tutu’s cycle of revenge and forgiveness and discuss how empathy for an offender / the offender’s family can impact a journey of forgiveness. This resource can be used within Citizenship, Religious Studies and PSHE or within tutor time discussions or drop down days. Each lesson is designed to last approx one hour. Due to the content of this lesson, it should be facilitated by a staff member who knows the class well and can direct responses and use prompt questions to encourage healthy discussion, whilst maintaining a safe environment for all young people. The resources are available for free download at and include a lesson plan, student booklet and powerpoint for each lesson. In addition The Forgiveness Project organises speakers in schools for assembly, within class time or for special events. Please contact for further information.
anna206
Assembly: D is for Differences

Assembly: D is for Differences

Bertie bird knocks how everyone is different to him, thinking his way is the only way to be, until he discovers a land where everyone is the same. This comprehensive assembly pack includes: A fully scripted assembly including an introduction and reflection with key questions throughout, A presentation (PDF) complete with engaging images, A set of Key Word cards to enhance understanding, A reward certificate. Themes explored include: individuality, animals, colour, respect, relationships, it’s good to be me, self esteem, differences.
MySchoolAssembly
Assembly: C is for Caring for Others

Assembly: C is for Caring for Others

An old man relies on his family to look after him as he ages and becomes less able. His son isn’t as kind as he could be but his grandson soon teaches his parents a lesson in caring that they will never forget. This comprehensive pack includes: A fully scripted assembly including an introduction and reflection with key questions throughout, A presentation (PDF) complete with engaging images, A set of Key Word cards to enhance understanding, A reward certificate. Themes explored include: family, support, friendship, thoughtfulness.
MySchoolAssembly
Aesop's Fables:  ´The Lion and the Hare´ (Week 8/12)

Aesop's Fables: ´The Lion and the Hare´ (Week 8/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Peace and Conflict Scheme of Work

Peace and Conflict Scheme of Work

A scheme of work which covers the causes of war, how it is justified politically and religiously, nuclear war, pacifism, north korea, 9.11 and terrorism, with an opportunity for an creative and analytical assessment. I've tweaked, modified and re-vamped these resources to maximise engagement and learning for 2018.
DavidFew
Aesop's Fables:  ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ (Week 7/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ (Week 7/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Nuclear War

Nuclear War

This lesson explores Nuclear war: the affects of nuclear weapons, if they can ever be justified, if there are any specific examples students know of, and how Christians might respond to the idea of nuclear war using the just war theory. SEND worksheet included, and a variety of extension activities (including how to make a peace crane) are included. As well as this, youtube videos and plenty of discussion activities, as well as an online ‘nuke map’ which explains how a nuke would affect the area you are, anywhere in the world. I know, right? An amazing resource. Learning Questions: What do Nuclear weapons do? Can Nuclear War ever be just? Are there any examples you know? How may Christians respond to Nuclear war?
DavidFew
9.11, Terrorism, War and Peace

9.11, Terrorism, War and Peace

This lesson has been a long one in the making. Having found resources from all over the web, edited my own video compiling footage from 9.11 and interviews from Geroge Bush and Osama Bin Laden, this lesson aims to give as an impartial view of 9.11 as possible. It includes neo-conservative explanations for 9.11, to Noam CHomsky esque critique of American Foreign Policy that Michael Moore would be proud of, and even allows al-Qaeda to explain their opinion. Obviously it makes explicit that targetting civilians is never, under any circumstances, acceptable, but tries to explain that 9.11 was a complicated event with historical, cultural, social and religious causes using a redacted and edited document which summarises complicated historical commentary into a digestible PDF. It even includes a brief mention of conspiracy theories for those more inquisitive students. Above all, it encourages critical thought and human compassion. A wide range of differentiated and extension activities here. Learning Questions: What was 9/11? How did it cause a war? Why did the the USA and al-Qaeda say it happened? Ext: Why do you think it happened? Independent, group and whole class activities included to bolster engagement and learning. There’s enough for at least 2 lessons here. But I’m selling it as one, because I’m nice like that.
DavidFew
Pacifism

Pacifism

A lesson to explore what pacifism is, how it has been used in the past and if it is a reasonable attitude to take to war. Looking particularly at the Quakers and their use of pacifism in anti-war protests and campaigning, the lesson aims to engage students in active critical thought and improve their awareness of how belief manifests in the real world. Learning Objectives: What is Pacifism? What is a conscientious objector? How did people treat conscientious objectors in WWI and II? Why might a religious person refuse to fight? Should we ALL be pacifists? It also includes links to youtube videos on conscience and examples of conscientious objectors for students to explore. It also includes, for more able students, examples of people who ‘broke the mold’ such as Dietrich Bonhoeffer.
DavidFew
Jihad: Muslim Attitudes to War

Jihad: Muslim Attitudes to War

A lesson that explores Muslim attitudes to war through Jihad. It explores the greater and lesser jihad, and gets students to collaboratively piece together what Jihad actually is whilst debunking the myth that it means ‘holy war’. Closer to ‘righteous struggle’ this lesson aims to draw comparison with the Just War Theory and help to see how in some ways it is more progressive than the JWT (avoids hurting plants and animals) and in others more religious (must be ordered by a religious leader). It also compares modern conflicts to Jihad, and the ways it has been misused. Learning Questions include: What are Muslim views to war? What is Jihad? How might Jihad be misinterpreted? Extension tasks included, as is a wordsearch starter for students to have a quick win at the beginning of the lesson to build learning engagement.
DavidFew
Aesop's Fables:  ‘Crow and the Swan’  (Week 6/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘Crow and the Swan’ (Week 6/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn