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Secondary school students will understand more about Black British history and identity. Based on six Heritage Lottery Fund productions, packed with oral histories, archive photographs, individual units of work, stage plays, illustrations, videos, and testimonials, each resource will enable teachers and parents to create unique learning activities, lesson plans, and comprehension questions. Many FREE resources available to support home learning and beyond.

Secondary school students will understand more about Black British history and identity. Based on six Heritage Lottery Fund productions, packed with oral histories, archive photographs, individual units of work, stage plays, illustrations, videos, and testimonials, each resource will enable teachers and parents to create unique learning activities, lesson plans, and comprehension questions. Many FREE resources available to support home learning and beyond.
Caribbean Nurses in Britain- 1950s /60s by Mrs Lawrence
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Caribbean Nurses in Britain- 1950s /60s by Mrs Lawrence

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This research resource will help teachers and Key Stage 3- Year 9 students to understand the experiences of Caribbean nurses who came to Britain in the 1960s to work in the NHS. Mrs. Mary Lawrence came from the Caribbean to Britain in 1962. She went into nursing in 1964, says, “In those days we look upon nursing as a top profession.” The resource is Mrs. Lawrence’s account of the training and working in the NHS in the 1960s. She talks about the recruitment drive to get Caribbean nurses to work in Britain in the 1950s and 1960s. It gives a clear account of the different categories and titles in nursing and the training involved. She states, “ The training was very demanding and expected to work on the wards for 48 hours per week alongside those already qualified." She talks about etiquette and manners, presentation, and care for the patients and how they were unable to challenge decisions made by their superiors. The resource is a is a three-page research document, with two supporting archive images. This resource will encourage teachers and parents to create unique activities for students during lockdown and beyond. Perfect for Black History Month teaching and research and gives a positive account of the contribution made to the NHS by a Windrush generation.
Jamaica Hidden Histories- Enterprise 1980s to 1990s
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Jamaica Hidden Histories- Enterprise 1980s to 1990s

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Video -subjects History, English, Art & Design & Geography – Stage 3, Year 9 students. A short video from the Jamaica Hidden Histories educational resource pack. Jamaican born fashion designer, Lorna Holder talks about working as head of young fashion for a leading British dress manufacture from 1979-1986
The Story of a 1960s black nurse.
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The Story of a 1960s black nurse.

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This resource will help students to understand the experience of migrants coming to Britain to study and work in the NHS in the 1960s. It is the oral history account of Esmel May Woma, who arrived in Nottingham from Jamaica in the early 1960s to study to be a nurse. This resource will give teachers, parents, and guardians a first-hand account of the migrant's journey and shows the positive contributions made to the NHS by the Windrush generation. The resource allows parents, teachers, and guardians to create their unique activities for students, perfect for home learning and beyond. It is a two and a half-page document, a significant backdrop for character development for stories, stage plays, and family time - for key stage 3 -Year 9 students.
Jamaican Hidden Histories educational  pack
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Jamaican Hidden Histories educational pack

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This cross-cultural pack is embedded in National Curriculum subjects such as History, English, Art & Design, and Design & Technology. There are also links to Geography, Computing, and PSHE and will help Key Stage 3, Year 9 students understand the historical and cultural links between Jamaica and Britain. It documents five decades of Jamaican influence on British culture, since Jamaica’s independence in 1962 to 2000. Placing Jamaica in its historical context since its acquisition under British Rule in 1655, it also shows the interconnections between Britain and the development of Jamaica’s distinctive cultural identity. All students from diverse background will benefit from a wide range of activities to further develop their learning skills, knowledge and personal development. This pack includes three editions: A 50 - page Learning Book with the use of artifacts, oral histories, quality images, photographs, testimonials, and lesson plans. It includes 35 pages of Activities and ’ Teachers’ Notes. The activities include comprehension questions as a ‘learning focus’ with differentiation and challenges for extension for more able students. The Teachers’ Notes provide additional contexual information and related links for further research. Finally, a Unit of Work in Art & Design with lesson plans produced with Burlington Danes Academy, based on Jamaican - born visual artist, George ‘Fowokan’ Kelly’s sculpture, Meditations Beneath Duppy Cherry Tree. It also looks at the work of Pablo Picasso, who had been influenced by African art in the early part of the 20th century. Supporting DVSs are also available on TES to download
Building Bridges- A case study
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Building Bridges- A case study

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This resource is a case study based on the Building Bridges resource pack, available on TES, showing the experiences of the white community in seeing large groups of Caribbean people arriving in Britain after the Second World War - 1948 to 1962 - known as "The Windrush. https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/building-bridges-windrush-experiences-11723774 The case study demonstrates the interactions between the older and younger generation, regarding the subject matter and enabled both to learn from each other. Both groups have taken lead roles in facilitating workshops, oral history interviews, and sharing experiences. The elders’ involvement, through their stories and oral history, provides a great deal of cultural learning for future generations. They gain a sense of satisfaction and purpose in passing on their experiences and knowledge. Young people’s involvement provides a distinctive perspective on the activities. Suitable for different key stages and curriculum requirements.
The Ones We Left Behind - part two and three
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The Ones We Left Behind - part two and three

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This resource is a Lesson starter for performance art students 16+. It will help in learning about the impact on the lives of families and diverse communities when we leave loved ones behind to start a new life in a new country. Teachers will find the resource useful in encouraging students to look outwards with curiosity and respect, listening to and learning from real voices, and identifying that which is specific and unique. The information came from oral history workshops and community research in London in 2006 from diverse communities about families separated by continents, relocating to new countries, and merely moving from one city to another. These stories formed the basis for truthful, high-quality dramas, which genuinely celebrate diversity. This resource is the second, and the third part of the book, The Ones We Left Behind, available on TES. This resource filled with unique supporting photographs, testimonials, family histories, and contributions from secondary school children in London. Included in the resource is ‘Departure Lounge,’ a dramatic monologue written by Lorna Holder. Nena, a woman in her forties, sits nervously, waiting for the boarding announcement in the departure lounge at the airport. Now returning to the Philippines after 25 years working in the U.K, Nena has to make a final decision; should she return to the Philippines, to the husband she hardly knows and son whose childhood she missed? Or should she remain working for the family who employ her and the ‘adopted’ English children she has raised? The monologue, ‘Departure Lounge’ is based on research into the oral histories of Britain’s Filipino community. It was performed at the British Museum in 2006.
Living Under One Roof - short video
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Living Under One Roof - short video

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The Living Under One Roof monologue, written and produced by Lorna Holder captures and presents the oral histories (real voice) of Dorothy, from Africa who migrated to England during the early 1960s. This is a useful resource for teachers and students to help develop their knowledge and understanding of the global movement of families and communities. Living Under One Roof went global being chosen by Cultures France for the 2009 installation Encounters of Bamako/African Photography Biennial in Mali. This short video is performed in English with French subtitles Age coding: 11–18 Subjects: Citizenship, Drama, Modern History
Jamaica Hidden Histories-Jamaican Independence
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Jamaica Hidden Histories-Jamaican Independence

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Video- subjects History, English & PSHE - Stage 3, Year 9 students. A short video from the Jamaica Hidden Histories educational resource pack with community elders sharing with young people their experiences of growing up in Jamaica at the dawn of independence from Britain in 1962. They talk how family and cultural backgrounds shaped and strengthened their own identity and sense of belonging within their community
Jamaica Hidden Histories- Oliver Cromwell Takes Jamaica
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Jamaica Hidden Histories- Oliver Cromwell Takes Jamaica

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Video -subjects History, English & PSHE – Stage 3, Year 9 students. A 9 minutes video to accompany the Jamaica Hidden Histories educational resource pack, outlining the historical and cultural links between Jamaica and Britain. The video starts with Oliver Cromwell taking the island from the Spanish in 1655, concluding in 2000s showing why Jamaica has become a global brand. The video is a relevant blueprint for teaching about other cultures in context and will help students from diverse backgrounds to further develop their learning skills, knowledge and personal development
Hanging Out-  Youth culture then and now
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Hanging Out- Youth culture then and now

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This Ebook, published in 2012, is the perfect research resource for Year 12 students and adults in learning about British popular culture. The book, by Lorna Holder, focuses on the immense changes that occurred in popular and social customs during the 1950s and 1960s. This period is brought to life through an exploration of the fashions, music, sport, film, and entertainment of that time. Members from London’s diverse communities share their experiences in hanging out in their various boroughs. They talk about how music and the club scenes of the 1960s played a vital part in bringing black and white young people together. From sewing 1950s fashion to designer brand obsession, to Mods and Rockers and anti-war protest and social change, this book makes history accessible and relevant. Filled with iconic photographic images of people and places. See also The Hanging Out trailer below For fine art, music, politic, fashion, media, sports, history, and film studies.
The Ones We Left Behind- part one
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The Ones We Left Behind- part one

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This resource is a Lesson starter for performance art students 16+. It will help in learning about the impact on the lives of families and diverse communities when we leave loved ones behind to start a new life in a new country. Teachers will find the resource useful in encouraging students to look outwards with curiosity and respect, listening to and learning from real voices, and identifying that which is specific and unique. The information came from oral history workshops and community research in London in 2006 from diverse communities about families separated by continents, relocating to new countries, and merely moving from one city to another. These stories formed the basis for truthful, high-quality dramas, which genuinely celebrate diversity. Included in the resource is a 30-minute play by Troy Andrew Fairclough, ‘Homeward Bound’ is set in the Departure Lounge at Heathrow Airport. Calvin, 43, makes a last-minute attempt to prevent his mother from boarding a plane. Pearl, his mother, is a woman in her sixties who knows her mind and wants to return to Jamaica to live out her retirement. While mother and son argue their differences, it is Calvin's teenage daughter Shinade who brings things to ahead. Pearl's beloved younger son, Courtney, is absent. Although Pearl is determined to go back to Jamaica, she is experiencing the same feelings of dread and excitement she felt about coming to England all those years ago. This entertaining, informative play highlights issues and experiences of Caribbean people who came to Britain in the 1960s, and who have now decided to return home. Part two and three of this book is also available on TES
The making of Meditations Beneath Duppycherry Tree
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The making of Meditations Beneath Duppycherry Tree

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As part of the Jamaica Hidden Histories project this video focuses on the Jamaican sculpture, George' Fowokan' Kelly. In April 2014 Fowokan shared his journey from musician to acclaimed self- taught sculptor and artist with 40 Year 9 students at Burlington Danes Academy in West London. The focus of the session was the all-important spiritual connection with his African roots, culture and heritage as revealed in his sculpture, Meditations Beneath Duppycherry Tree. Under the guidance of the Art Teacher the students took part in a series of Art and Design lessons inspired by Fowokan’s sculpture. With the support of the Jamaica Hidden Histories pack this video provides teachers with a unique and readily accessible toolkit to engage students in the historical and cultural links between Jamaica and Britain. It is also a blueprint for teaching about other cultures in context. Embedded in National Curriculum subjects such as History, English, Art & Design & Technology, with links to Geography Computing and PSHE, it is aimed primarily, but not exclusively, for Key Stage 3, Year 9 students.
Moving Out -  Nottingham's  1960s Windrush community at work.
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Moving Out - Nottingham's 1960s Windrush community at work.

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This e-book resource, by Lorna Holder is for students and teachers to use for research into 1960s Nottingham’s Caribbean community at work. It will enable Key Stage 3- Year 9 students from diverse backgrounds to research their own cultural identity and have a sense of belonging. It, takes a unique look at Industrial Nottingham through the eyes of the 1960s Windrush settlers, focusing on their experiences of, and contributions to the local industries of the time. These industries include the mines, the textile and garment industry, the building industry, as well as companies and institutes such as Boots, Raleigh, Nottingham Transport, and the NHS. The book also explores how Nottingham’s pioneering Caribbean community created its places of worship and recreation. The e-book is supported with unique 1960s photographic images, and heartwarming stories from community elders, such as Community Elder Mrs. Mary Lawrence, giving her account of work as a nurse in the 1960s. Contributions were made by Roy Wilks, about working as a miner at Gedling Colliery, who said. “The experience was very frightening. It was like a phobia." We hear about the places where Nottingham’s Caribbean community worshipped during the 1960s from real voices from the community. Manning Comprehensive School and Bramcote Park Business & Enterprise School played a huge part in this project attending the workshops and interviewing elders about their experiences. The e-book has archival photographs to help support the learning, such as images of miners from the National Coal Mining Museum For England, unique images taken of nurses by Esmel May Woma, local photography. It shows images of Caribbean people working at the bike company Raleigh and Boots. It also gives an in-depth account of the historian Revd Christian Weaver CBE of the contributions made by Caribbean people in Nottingham.
Building Bridges -impact of Caribbean migration on  the Host community.
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Building Bridges -impact of Caribbean migration on the Host community.

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This 8 page resource is designed to help students to understand more clearly the impact of Caribbean migration on the lives of the Host community in London. The resource portrays the experiences of the white community in seeing large groups of Caribbean people arriving in Britain after the Second World War - 1948 to 1962 - known as “The Windrush.” It has a heart felt interviews and discussions with English elders, from the borough of Camden, filled with supporting never before seen photographic archives and model general questions. The materials could be used in many ways and across a wide age range, which makes it suitable for different key stages and curriculum requirements. Importantly, the resource allows teachers and parents to create unique learning activities for homeschooling and beyond. This resource is firmly rooted in the tradition of oral storytelling, helping to bring to the forefront unheard stories of our past and to build a bridge to a better future for our young people. Building Bridges was a Heritage Lottery funded project, produced by Lorna Holder in 2008.
Style in my DNA -Edited extract from the book
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Style in my DNA -Edited extract from the book

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This resoure is an edited edition from the book by Lorna Holder, Style in my DNA, 2018, which documents 70 years of Caribbean influence on British fashion. It is informative and essential in representing black cultural history, fashion and identity. It is an invaluable resource for fashion studies, black studies, Windrush archive study, research and social history. The striking images in the book will help anyone seeking to understand the Caribbean migrant experience. The book is also a memoir of Lorna Holder, a child of the Windrush generation. Lorna arrived in the UK from Jamaica in 1959 and was brought up in Nottingham. Graduating with a BA Honours in Fashion and Textiles in 1975, she was the first black graduate in fashion to pass through the then Trent Polytechnic. She went on to be a very successful fashion designer, producer, writer, curator and an active figure within London’s Caribbean Community.
Living Under One Roof  promotion
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Living Under One Roof promotion

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Living Under One Roof: This promotion contains four useful resources for teachers and students to help develop their knowledge and understanding of the global movement of families and communities. This pack is suitable for home learning and will help parents through the summer term. The format of research into local communities, workshops, and drama productions, shown in the many photographs and narratives of all the resources, is an innovative way of engaging all ages. Building Bridges resource pack: oral history research document with unique images, captures and presents the stories (real voices) of elders from the host community in London. The elders share their unique stories on seeing Caribbean people arriving in large numbers after the 2nd World War. Year 7+ students. Moving Out: a resource for year 7+ students, based on oral history research, showing the experiences of Caribbean settlers in industrial Nottingham during the 1960s, working in the mining industry and the NHS. Hanging Out: a book about the 1950s and 1960s youth culture in four boroughs in London and dealt with fashion, music, film, sports, and entertainment. For fine art, fashion, media, and film Year 12 students and adults. The Ones We Left Behind: a drama production resource: This book encompasses stories from many communities about families separated by continents, relocating to new countries, even merely moving from one city to another and bring to light the impact of leaving loved ones behind. The resource includes a stage play and monologue, useful for school drama productions, for Year 7+ students. A unique Christmas bundle for learning about diverse communities through the medium of art, fashion, history, drama English and social history.
Caribbean Elders  in Hackney  from  1950s
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Caribbean Elders in Hackney from 1950s

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This resource will help families, teachers, and students to learn more about the Windrush generation, particularly the experiences of Caribbean elders who settled in Hackney, London from the 1950s. The resource includes four pages of individual oral history account of Caribbean elders. Information is suitable for different key stages and curriculum requirements. Black parents at home can use the resource to help educate their children further about their heritage, giving them a better sense of identity and belonging. Parents from diverse communities can use it to find similar values and shared experiences. This resource is firmly rooted in the tradition of oral storytelling, and teachers can use it in the classroom to support drama and media studies. In 2008 Tuareg Production produced a series of workshops in Hackney, interviewing some of Hackney’s Caribbean elders from islands including Jamaica, Barbados, St Lucia, Dominica, and Trinidad. The workshops held at the Marie Lloyd Day Centre, William Morris Caribbean Centre, Hackney Museum, and the Hackney Caribbean Elderly Organisation. The elders reminisced and shared experiences from as early as 1954 when they first settled in the area. Their recollections and memories form the basis for the adaption of the Living Under One Roof stage play, set in Hackney by Lorna Holder. Hackney Museum, in 2008 did an exhibition, Living Under One Roof, Windrush, and beyond, which covered all aspects of life for the first generation of Caribbean migrant workers. Finally, the Living Under One Roof – Windrush and beyond education resource pack for primary schools in Hackney, launched at a prestigious event at the House of Lords hosted by prominent peers Baroness Amos and Baroness Howells, produced by The Hackney Learning Trust and Lorna Holder.
A Black Coal Miner's story
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A Black Coal Miner's story

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This resource will help students and teachers to research specific places and conditions of the workplace of Caribbean people in Britain during the 1960s. Based on the oral history account of a former black coal miner from Nottingham, this four-page resource will enable Key Stage 3- Year 9 students from diverse backgrounds to research their own cultural identity and have a sense of belonging. The research piece clearly shows the decisions made by the elder in coming to Britain to work, the desire to return back to Jamaica, the compromises made and is an important piece of British social history. He talks about his job as a tailor in Jamaica and the promises he made to his mother, not to work in the coal mines in Britain. He takes us on a journey to the Job Centre and getting his first job in Nottingham at Beeston Boiler, where they made radiators. We hear about the other foreign workers and the language barriers. Next, he talks about applying for work at Gedling Colliery in Nottingham, his first formal training job, and the fear of going down in the mines. The research piece includes hours worked, salary paid, type of clothing worn, type of coal mined and conflict at work. The information provided in this short research document will enable students to write, truthfully, essays, stage plays, and form the narrative for short videos. A great resource to aid black history month teaching and to understand further the contributions made by the Windrush generation.
Moving Out video
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Moving Out video

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This short video takes a unique look at Industrial Nottingham through the eyes of the 1960s Windrush settlers. These industries include the mines, the textile and garment industry, the building industry, as well as companies and institutes such as Boots, Raleigh, Nottingham Transport, and the NHS. This resource will help parents and teachers with homeschooling and is a perfect research medium. It is entertaining with unique archive images, 1960s ska music, and contributions from Caribbean elders. The elders share their heartwarming stories of working in 1960s Britain. It will enable Key Stage 3- Year 9 students from diverse backgrounds to research their own cultural identity and have a better sense of belonging. Moving Out was produced in 2007 by Lorna Holder.
Living Under One Roof in Hackney-  short documentary
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Living Under One Roof in Hackney- short documentary

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A free home learning resource for all ages. This short 20 minute documentary is based on real life experiences of Caribbean settlers, living and working in Hackney and surrounding areas, during the 1940s and 1960s. Students will experience with family members the heart breaking -heart-warming journey of that Windrush generation. Useful content for research work for teachers, students and parents doing homeschooling and beyond. Produced by Lorna Holder.