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Women's History Month: Escape Room - Social Studies

Women's History Month: Escape Room - Social Studies

This breakout escape room is a fun way for students to test their knowledge with the many famous women throughout history. Women Included: ♦ Amelia Earhart ♦ Betsy Ross ♦ Clara Schumann ♦ Eleanor Roosevelt ♦ Elizabeth Coleman ♦ Frida Kahlo ♦ Harriet Tubman ♦ Helen Keller ♦ Joan of Arc ♦ Mae Jemison ♦ Marie Curie ♦ Margaret Thatcher ♦ Maya Angelou ♦ Mother Teresa ♦ Rosalind Franklin ♦ Rosa Parks ♦ Sacagawea ♦ Sally Ride ♦ Sojourner Truth ♦ Susan B. Anthony Contents: ♦ Teacher Instructions with Usage Guide and FAQ ♦ 20 Multiple Choice Questions ♦ 5 Decoders for each of the 5 Levels ♦ Student Recording Sheet and Teacher Answer Key ♦ Link to an optional, but recommended, digital breakout room
ScienceSpot
The British Empire: Goods and Trade.

The British Empire: Goods and Trade.

**The purpose of this lesson is for students to develop their understanding regarding the importance of trade for the growth of the Empire. ** **Lesson Plan: ** Hook / starter - Embedded video of all the countries which have been part of the British Empire - students to enter and remember as many as they can. Lesson introduction (optional) goods of the Empire such as bananas, spices, tea, coffee, sugar etc. are placed into bags / big bags - students circulate the room and feel feel / smell the bags content to guess what the good may be. This leads into the watching of a BBC video where students are challenged to remember more goods that the Empire traded in. Students complete the ‘Empire Map Worksheet’ with the locations of goods and trade routes. Students are then issued with an advertisement of one of the goods sold back in Britain. students engage in a MIX-PAIR-SHARE activity to discuss key questions linked to the advertisements Students then return to write up their work in the books linked to a GCSE style question (Exam skill advice and structure included for differentiation). **Plenary: **Blockbusters linked to empire good! **Lots of of interactive activities to engage students with songs included and moving gifs! **
morlem
Royal Wedding Maths Lesson

Royal Wedding Maths Lesson

**L.O: **I can apply my mathematics skills to practical problem solving. S.C I can choose the perfect wedding venue using my knowledge of area and perimeter. I can find the correct measurements for the wedding cake using my knowledge of shapes I can select the cheapest option out of two given options. I can apply all my mathematical skills effectively. I can present my work at a high standard. I can work effectively and collaboratively in a group. Curriculum Links: Number: • Solve number and practical problems that recognising numbers, addition, multiplication and division. • Solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why. Geometry: • Illustrate and name parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference and know that the diameter is twice the radius. • To be able to work out the perimeter, area, circumpherence, diameter and the volume of shapes. Ratio and proportion: • Solve problems involving unequal sharing and grouping using knowledge of fractions and multiples. Following the latest news report that Meghan Markle’s dad has had to pull out of the wedding, I have created a maths lesson for Year 6. As their SATs are finished it would be nice for them to start project like activites. This puts the pupils in place of the wedding planner meaning that they have to use a range of mathematical skills. They work in groups and give a formal presentation at the end explaining their working out and the reasons for making the choices they have. They will do this lesson Friday so there is an emphasis of there only being one day left so they have to work quickly and efficiently. I hope you enjoy this! I have attached a detailed lesson plan which makes everything clear.
shannon_kavanagh
First Thanksgiving: Escape Room - Social Studies

First Thanksgiving: Escape Room - Social Studies

This breakout escape room is a fun way for students to test their knowledge with the first Thanksgiving. Contents: ♦ Teacher Instructions with Usage Guide and FAQ ♦ 20 Multiple Choice Questions ♦ 5 Decoders for each of the 5 Levels ♦ Student Recording Sheet and Teacher Answer Key ♦ Link to an optional, but recommended, digital breakout room
ScienceSpot
Civil Rights: Escape Room - Social Studies

Civil Rights: Escape Room - Social Studies

This breakout escape room is a fun way for students to test their knowledge with the major historical figures and events during the Civil Rights Movement. Contents: ♦ Teacher Instructions with Usage Guide and FAQ ♦ 20 Multiple Choice Questions ♦ 5 Decoders for each of the 5 Levels ♦ Student Recording Sheet and Teacher Answer Key ♦ Link to an optional, but recommended, digital breakout room
ScienceSpot
Holocaust -  Nazi Propaganda

Holocaust - Nazi Propaganda

This is a lesson I designed for an OFSTED inspection in 2014. The lesson is more catered for KS3 students that are learning about the Holocaust and Nazi Propaganda and at the same time developing skills associated with History.
BattleAxe1066
Black History Month: Escape Room - Social Studies

Black History Month: Escape Room - Social Studies

This breakout escape room is a fun way for students to test their knowledge of the many African American figures throughout history. Full “Letter” sized cards as well as smaller sized cards are provided. African American Figures Included: Barack Obama, Booker T. Washington, Colin Powell, Condoleezza Rice, Elizabeth Coleman, Frederick Douglass, George Washington Carver, Harriet Tubman, Jackie Robinson, Jeanette Epps, Jesse Owens, Louis Armstrong, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., Maya Angelou, Rosa Parks, Sarah Elizabeth Goode, Scott Joplin, Sojourner Truth, Thurgood Marshall, W. E. B. Du Bois, William Still, Contents: ♦ Teacher Instructions with Usage Guide and FAQ ♦ 20 Multiple Choice Questions ♦ 5 Decoders for each of the 5 Levels ♦ Student Recording Sheet and Teacher Answer Key ♦ Link to an optional, but recommended, digital breakout room
ScienceSpot
19th-Early 20th Century Society in Britain: Class Structure, Chartists and Attitudes towards Women

19th-Early 20th Century Society in Britain: Class Structure, Chartists and Attitudes towards Women

This lesson has been designed as the first in a KS3 unit of work on Women’s fight for suffrage in the early 20th Century. It is titled ‘19th-Early 20th Century Society in Britain: Class Structure, Chartists and Attitudes towards Women’. Key focuses include: … Class structure (Activity) … Chartism (information and discussion) … Attitudes towards women (source analysis and activity) … Introductions to the Suffragists and the Suffragettes … Plenary and homework Thanks.
MrTHistory
GCSE 9-1 Anglo Saxon & Norman England: Norman changes to government

GCSE 9-1 Anglo Saxon & Norman England: Norman changes to government

GCSE Anglo Saxon and Norman England New 2016 Specification Grades 9-1 Could be used for Edexcel, AQA, WJEC, OCR etc. Full lesson investigating how the Normans changed or kept parts of the Anglo Saxon system of government Focus on centralisation of power, reducing power of Earls, Regents, Shire Reeves and the Forest Laws. Discussion of change and continuity in governance, leading to a return to the 16 Mark Question on power. All lesson activities and resources included. Part of Anglo Saxon and Norman England 3, Norman England Please see my other lessons & resources Feedback welcome
MrThorntonTeach
GCSE 9-1 Anglo Saxon & Norman England: The Normanisation of the Church

GCSE 9-1 Anglo Saxon & Norman England: The Normanisation of the Church

GCSE Anglo Saxon and Norman England New 2016 Specification Grades 9-1 Could be used for Edexcel, AQA, WJEC, OCR etc. Full lesson investigating how the church in England was Normanised, looking at the problems in the Anglo Saxon Church, Lanfranc’s appointment and students complete a roadmap to show the Normanisation of the Church All lesson activities and resources included. Part of Anglo Saxon and Norman England 3, Norman England Please see my other lessons & resources Feedback welcome
MrThorntonTeach
GCSE 9-1 Anglo Saxon & Norman England: Story so far Topic 1

GCSE 9-1 Anglo Saxon & Norman England: Story so far Topic 1

GCSE Anglo Saxon and Norman England New 2016 Specification Grades 9-1 Could be used for Edexcel, AQA, WJEC, OCR etc. Retrieval word fill that covers Topic 1 of the Edexcel course: Anglo Saxon Society, Politics, Power, The Godwins, Embassy to Normandy, Tostigs Rebellion, Succession Crisis, Fulford Gate, Stamford Bridge and the Battle of Hastings Print on A3 paper for students to complete Please see my other lessons & resources Feedback welcome
MrThorntonTeach
GCSE 9-1 Anglo Saxon & Norman England: Who held power in Anglo Saxon England?

GCSE 9-1 Anglo Saxon & Norman England: Who held power in Anglo Saxon England?

GCSE Anglo Saxon and Norman England New 2016 Specification Grades 9-1 Could be used for Edexcel, AQA, WJEC, OCR etc. Full lesson discussing who held power in Anglo Saxon England at the time of Edward the Confessor. Looks at the Witan, King Edward the Confessor and the Earls with a pie chart analysis to discuss their power. Mini Quiz to finish All lesson activities and resources included. Part of Anglo Saxon and Norman England 1, Anglo Saxon Society Please see my other lessons & resources Feedback welcome
MrThorntonTeach
American Symbols: Escape Room - Social Studies

American Symbols: Escape Room - Social Studies

This breakout escape room is a fun way for students to test their knowledge with American Symbols. Full “Letter” sized cards as well as smaller sized cards are provided. American Symbols Included: Statue of Liberty, Liberty bell, White House, Mt. Rushmore, Capitol Building, Bald Eagle, Lincoln Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, American Flag, Turkey, Uncle Sam, Great Seal, Star Spangled Banner, U.S. Constitution, Washington Memorial, The Alamo, The Eye of Providence, Gateway Arch, Oak Tree, Golden Gate Bridge Contents: ♦ Teacher Instructions with Usage Guide and FAQ ♦ 20 Multiple Choice Questions ♦ 5 Decoders for each of the 5 Levels ♦ Student Recording Sheet and Teacher Answer Key ♦ Link to an optional, but recommended, digital breakout room
ScienceSpot
American Heroes Activity: Escape Room - Social Studies

American Heroes Activity: Escape Room - Social Studies

This breakout escape room is a fun way for students to test their knowledge of the many American heroes throughout history. Full “Letter” sized cards as well as smaller sized cards are provided. American Heroes Included: Abraham Lincoln, Amelia Earhart, Benjamin Franklin, Betsy Ross, Davy Crockett, Elizabeth Coleman, Frederick Douglass, George Washington, George Washington Carver, Harriet Tubman, Jackie Robinson, Martin Luther King, Neil Armstrong, Patrick Henry, Paul Revere, Rosa Parks, Samuel Adams, Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Jefferson Contents: ♦ Teacher Instructions with Usage Guide and FAQ ♦ 20 Multiple Choice Questions ♦ 5 Decoders for each of the 5 Levels ♦ Student Recording Sheet and Teacher Answer Key ♦ Link to an optional, but recommended, digital breakout room
ScienceSpot
The Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1914

The Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1914

These great engaging resources are designed to help students who are studying the Liberal Reforms in Britain from 1906 to 1914. They have been designed to meet the needs of the full spectrum of learners in a main stream school. For more information about these resources, please click on the resource preview.
Roy_Huggins
King James I, 1603 - 1625

King James I, 1603 - 1625

These outstanding resources look at key issues during the controversial Reign of James I. They begin by looking at the problems that he faced during his reign and the impact of the break with Rome and include his relations with Parliament, The Divine Rights of Kings, Money, taxation and religious problems. The issue of the religious problems facing James I is explored via both the Gunpowder Plot and The Pilgrim Fathers. Whilst interconnected with both these problems is popular beliefs and superstitions which is explored through my resources on Witchcraft. The overarching theme to all these resources is their link to not just the consequences of the break with Rome but ultimately the causes of the English Civil War. Please click on each resource to find out more.
Roy_Huggins
Why were witch trials unfair in 17th Century Britain?

Why were witch trials unfair in 17th Century Britain?

This lesson looks at how fair witch trials were in Britain during the 17th Century. It continues on from my previous lesson on why people why people believed in witches and why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts in the 17th century. This lesson focuses also on the methods and tactics that men like Matthew Hopkins used for hunting witches and how James I tried to apply a more ‘rational’ approach. These resources are beautifully designed and differentiated and a must have anyone studying this controversial period of history or wishing to contrast what was happening in the Salem witch trials in the USA. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page Microsoft Word Document and an accompanying eighteen slide PowerPoint which include information, sources, links to video clips, starters, plenaries, questions and differentiated tasks and activities to help support the worksheet. The lesson begins with a choice of starters including a snowballing activity of the key words or a video clip summary where students note down the evidence that was used to prove that Blackadder was a witch . It then moves on to explain through a variety of information and sources how people tried to identify witches and finishes off by looking at the trial of Ursula Kemp. You can preview the tasks and activities below. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: What evidence was used to convict a witch in the 17th Century? Understand: Why did people hunt for witches? Evaluate: How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Citizenship WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What evidence was used to convict a witch in the 17th Century? Explain: Why did people hunt for witches? Analyse: How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century?

How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century?

This outstanding lesson looks at how fair witch trials were in the 17th Century. It continues on from my previous lesson on why people why people believed in witches and why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts in the 17th century. This lesson focuses also on the methods and tactics that men like Matthew Hopkins used for hunting witches and how James I tried to apply a more ‘rational’ approach. These resources are beautifully designed and differentiated and a must have anyone studying this controversial period of history. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page Microsoft Word Document and an accompanying eighteen slide PowerPoint which include information, sources, links to video clips, starters, plenaries, questions and differentiated tasks and activities to help support the worksheet. The lesson begins with a choice of starters including a snowballing activity of the key words or a video clip summary where students note down the evidence that was used to prove that Blackadder was a witch . It then moves on to explain through a variety of information and sources how people tried to identify witches and finishes off by looking at the trial of Ursula Kemp. You can preview the tasks and activities below. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: What evidence was used to convict a witch in the 17th Century? Understand: Why did people hunt for witches? Evaluate: How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Citizenship WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What evidence was used to convict a witch in the 17th Century? Explain: Why did people hunt for witches? Analyse: How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Victorians Topic IDL Interdisciplinary Forward Plan

Victorians Topic IDL Interdisciplinary Forward Plan

Complete Victorians Social Studies/Science/Literacy IDL forward plan for a first/second level (CfE) composite class. Can be easily adapted. Includes Experiences and Outcomes, Learning Intentions and Success Criteria.
rc294
Changes over time planning - Royal Family

Changes over time planning - Royal Family

Changes over time planning focusing on changes in time between the time of Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth the second. Includes; transport, clothes, toys and writing letters to the Queen and celebrating the royal wedding. Planned for a year 1 class.
kennykoalabear
Why did people believe in witchcraft in the Seventeenth Century?

Why did people believe in witchcraft in the Seventeenth Century?

These outstanding resources looks at why people believed in witches in the seventeenth century and why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts? They are beautifully designed and differentiated for the full range of ability range. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page Microsoft Word Document and an accompanying seventeen slide PowerPoint which include information, sources, links to video clips, starters, plenaries, questions and differentiated tasks and activities. The lesson begins with a choice of starters including a snowballing activity of the key words, a buzz and go squares activity or a source analysis of witches selling their souls in return for magical powers. It then moves on to explain why peopled believed in witches and the social, political and economic reasons for an increase in suspicion and fear which helped to fuel am increase in witch hunts during this period. The lesson looks at how witches were identified and which groups of people were unfairly persecuted and used a scapegoat for problems at the time. Both resources include a range of different questions and activities which can be printed off and used with your students. The PowerPoint includes further differentiation and support for students. These tasks and activities source analysis questions as well as a thinking skills review activity to extend the more able which could be used in tandem with a heads and tails activity for the less able. The lesson rounds off with an optional extended question. If you like this lesson then you might be interested in buying the follow up lesson on how fair were which trials which can be purchased separately or as a bundled resource: The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: Why did people believe in witches in the 16th and 17th Centuries? Understand: Why did people hunt for witches? Evaluate: Why were certain people persecuted? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why people believed in witches in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Explain: Why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts? Analyse: Why were certain people persecuted? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
KS3 Henry VIII

KS3 Henry VIII

Five lessons well resourced and researched to create a flowing scheme of work for KS3. Each lesson is fully differentiated and includes options for SEN and LA pupils as well as challenging HA+. Pupils enjoy these lessons because they link back to prior knowledge they may have attained through primary school, activities include creating facebook conversations, carousel tasks and levelled extended writing, of which could be marked formally if you so wish. All lessons available to buy singularly for £2-£3 on my TES shop. There are some lessons missing from the SOW as a whole because I hadn’t made the other lessons from scratch, for example you may want to include lessons such as the dissolution of the monasteries, pilgrimage of grace, and others.
ellie_ryl
The Holocaust: Anne Frank's Experience.

The Holocaust: Anne Frank's Experience.

This was graded an ‘outstanding’ lesson. Hook Starter to be handed to students as they enter class. Lesson Intention and differentiated outcomes. Video links are included within the presentation. This lesson could be used without the need for exercise books as it is a learning stations based lesson for the most part. Diary extracts / time line are included within this pack (other stations could include text books, laptops EG: On the Anne Frank Website an interactive tour of the Annex. I also included a ‘bigger picture’ station which showed an overview of The Holocaust though pictures etc as a whole. (All images and videos / sheets from Google / BBC Bitesize). Lesson plan included.
morlem
What was the British Empire?

What was the British Empire?

WALT: To understand how the empire powered the Industrial Revolution MUST: Describe what the British Empire was. SHOULD: Be able to explain how the Empire made Britain rich and how it impacted other countries. COULD: Make a judgement on whether the British Empire was a good thing. .
W17
Why did children work in factories?

Why did children work in factories?

WALT: To understand why some people opposed and some people agreed with children working in factories. MUST: Be able to describe what life was like for children in factories. SHOULD: Be able to explain why some people oppose and some people agreed with children working in factories. COULD: Evaluate the sources to support your understanding of the arguments for and against children working in factories. .
W17
Persuasive writing - purposeful letters about Walter Tull and Phoebe Chapple

Persuasive writing - purposeful letters about Walter Tull and Phoebe Chapple

These resources support a set of lessons on purposeful persuasive letter writing (KS2). Based on research I did to write Vlad and the First World War, they focus on Walter Tull and Phoebe Chapple. Both could have been awarded the Military Cross, but prevailing attitudes discriminated against them. The lessons support writing a letter to persuade the Ministry of Defence to award them posthumously. It includes a set of lesson plans linked to the literacy curriculum, templates for making notes and crib sheets if you want to focus on the letter writing rather than note taking. There are website links for research and 2 videos summarising their lives. Government offices respond to letters so if sent will receive a letter back. Further resources are available on my website www.readingriddle.co.uk along with information on my books and school visits.
cunning1
Were the Catholics Framed in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605?

Were the Catholics Framed in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605?

This much loved resource has now been updated to PowerPoint so that it is accessible for the full ability range through a change of multimedia and interactive content. If you wish to buy the worksheet version which was the number one download on school history, it can still be purchased via my TES shop separately or as a bundled item. The lesson comes in two sections. The first looks at the traditional story of the Gunpowder Pot as it has been taught to school children for hundreds of years. I have created a series of questions and activities aimed at foundation and core students that helps them to study an old Victorian school history book version. This is a great exercise to help students appreciate how history has been taught in the past. I have uploaded a copy of my my chronology card sort on the Gunpowder Plot, which can be used as a starter or consolidation exercise. I have also linked in the Nick Knowles version of the Gunpowder The next section looks a the revisionist version of the Gunpowder Plot and gives students a series of contemporary sources and secondary research by historians to help them decide whether Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty. The activity aims to get them to draw a table to help them analyse the information before having a go at writing an extended answer or a newspaper report from either a Catholic or Protestant stand point on what happened. In order to help students analyse the sources I have included a range of graphic organisers, that you can select from. which can be printed off alongside the historical sources. The aims and objectives are: Theme: What were the consequences of the break with Rome? •Know: What happened during the Gunpowder Plot? •Understand: Why did the Catholics want to murder the King and Parliament? •Evaluate: How far does the historical evidence prove that Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty? WILF - What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: What happened during the Gunpowder Plot? •Explain: Why would the Catholics want to murder the King and Parliament? •Analyse: How far does the historical evidence prove that Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
20th Century History

20th Century History

13 hours of my best 20th Century History lessons. All 13 downloads contain fully resourced lesson packs - all with thoroughly differentiated powerpoints and worksheets, clip links, starters, plenaries, LOs to three levels throughout. The lessons are suitable for KS3 or 4, with some having been used for GCSE. All are amendable and editable. Designed to meet Ofsted Good-Outstanding criteria by a experienced History teacher in a UK secondary school. All lessons have been highly-rated by Tes users. This pack is created by EC Resources, the most popular Tes Resources author of last year.
History_Geek
The Reign of James I 1603 - 1625

The Reign of James I 1603 - 1625

These outstanding resources look at key issues during the controversial Reign of James I. They begin bylooking at the problems that he faced during his reign and the impact of the break with Rome and include his relations with Parliament, The Divine Rights of Kings, Money, taxation and religious problems. The issue of the religious problems facing James I is explored via both the Gunpowder Plot and The Pilgrim Fathers. Whilst interconnected with both these problems is popular beliefs and superstitions which is explored through my resources on Witchcraft. The overarching theme to all these resources is their link to not just the consequences of the break with Rome but ultimately the causes of the English Civil War. Please click on each resource to find out more.
Roy_Huggins
Who were the Pilgrim Fathers?

Who were the Pilgrim Fathers?

This outstanding lesson is designed to helped students understand who the Pilgrim Fathers were and why they left England to settle in America. It is a classic resource which has never failed to engage my students and has been carefully tweaked over the years to get the best possible outcomes. The resource can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customized to suit the needs of your students. For an extra £1 you can also purchase this resource with an accompanying PowerPoint or but it at a significantly discounted price as a bundled item. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a three page worksheet. The first page includes primary sources from the period as well as information on both the traditional and revisionist versions on who the Pilgrim Fathers were and why they left England to settle in the USA. The second page includes a range of different activities, including a starter and consolidation exercises to suit the full range of ability, whilst the third page includes two flow charts or decision trees that can be printed off, completed by students and stuck into their books to show the two different interpretations or versions of the history of the Pilgrim Fathers. I have also linked in a video that I have posted on You Tube on this topic which can be previewed with this resource. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who were the Pilgrim Fathers? •Understand: Why did they leave Europe to settle in America? •Evaluate: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers decide to settle around Cape Cod? •Skills: Source Analysis, Cause and Consequence WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: Who were the Pilgrim Fathers? •Explain: Why did they leave Europe to settle in America? •Analyse: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers decide to settle around Cape Cod? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
The Pilgrim Fathers

The Pilgrim Fathers

This outstanding lesson is designed to helped students understand who the Pilgrim Fathers were and why they left England to settle in America. It is a classic resource which has never failed to engage my students and has been carefully tweaked over the years to get the best possible outcomes. The resource can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customised to suit the needs of your students. For an extra £1 you can also purchase this resource with an accompanying PowerPoint or but it at a significantly discounted price as a bundled item. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a three page worksheet. The first page includes primary sources from the period as well as information on both the traditional and revisionist versions on who the Pilgrim Fathers were and why they left England to settle in the USA. The second page includes a range of different activities, including a starter and consolidation exercises to suit the full range of ability, whilst the third page includes two flow charts or decision trees that can be printed off, completed by students and stuck into their books to show the two different interpretations or versions of the history of the Pilgrim Fathers. I have also linked in a video that I have posted on You Tube on this topic which can be previewed with this resource. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who were the Pilgrim Fathers? •Understand: Why did they leave Europe to settle in America? •Evaluate: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers decide to settle around Cape Cod? •Skills: Source Analysis, Cause and Consequence WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: Who were the Pilgrim Fathers? •Explain: Why did they leave Europe to settle in America? •Analyse: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers decide to settle around Cape Cod? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
Life in Medieval England

Life in Medieval England

This is a series of lessons I have made for teaching Medieval England at Key Stage 3. Lesson 1: Villages and Towns Lesson 2: Religion and the Church Lesson 3: Crime and Punishment Lesson 4: The Murder of Thomas Becket Lesson 5: Life as a Medieval Knight Lesson 6: King John and the Magna Carta Lesson 7: The Peasants Revolt, 1381 The lessons on Thomas Becket and King John also have newly designed assessments that reflect the demands of the new GCSE. These can be used at your discretion. Each assessment contains an in-depth mark sheet and reflection activities that will save you hours in marking. Thanks.
MrTHistory
Medieval England: The Peasants Revolt, 1381

Medieval England: The Peasants Revolt, 1381

This is a fully resourced lesson on the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. It has been desgined as part of a KS3 unit of work on Medieval England. It would also tie in well after studying the Black Death. This lesson is full of in-depth information, activities and a number of relevant education videos.
MrTHistory
Women who made History

Women who made History

Just a handy help sheet, showing 6 different women ‘who made History.’ I’m going to use this as part of a discussion on ‘International Women’s Day,’ prompting students to think about: how these women faced adversity/were ahead of their time in some way what character traits and qualities they showed what it was that gave them the strength to be courageous, despite being afraid how we can use their message to find strength and courage in our daily lives.
skillswithfrills
Life in Medieval England

Life in Medieval England

Here I have bundled a selection of lessons designed for KS3 that examine aspects of life for people in medieval England. These are… Lesson 1 - Villages and Towns Lesson 2 - Religion and the Church Lesson 3 - Crime and Punishment Each lesson is thoroughly designed and resourced, with many different activites. Thanks.
MrTHistory
International Women's Day Bundle

International Women's Day Bundle

A bundle of activities for using on International Women’s Day or during Women’s History Month this March. The bundle contains: International Women’s Day Quiz (PowerPoint) International Women’s Day Assembly 100 years of voting in Britain presentation All suitable for using with KS3 or KS4.
blossomingminds
KS3 History: How did Elizabeth I stabilise England?

KS3 History: How did Elizabeth I stabilise England?

KS3 History Elizabethan England, Reformation, Religious Settlement Fully resources lesson investigating how Elizabeth brought stabilty to England through the Religious Settlement Looks at how Elizabeth changed religion in England after Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary I with a religious rollercoaster activity for students to complete. GCSE focus with narrative of changes over time (linked to Edexcel 9 to 1 GCSE) Links perfectly to 9 1 GCSE History, can serve as an excellent base for development at KS4 All lesson activities and resources included. Please see my other lessons & resources Feedback welcome
MrThorntonTeach
Early Modern History Bundle

Early Modern History Bundle

6x fully resourced lesson packs - all complete with differentiated powerpoints and worksheets, clip links, starters, plenaries, LOs to three levels throughout. These lessons cover a variety of topics with a focus on the 15-17th centuries. Designed to meet Ofsted Good-Outstanding criteria by a experienced History teacher in a UK secondary school. Suitable for KS3 and easy to adapt. I’m going to keep adding to this, so if you buy it check your downloads now and again as I’ll have added something new :)
History_Geek