1. Resources Home
  2. Secondary
  3. Art and design
  4. Artists and artefacts
Claude Monet

Claude Monet

Impressionism 1840-1926 Rouen Cathedral, Main Door and Saint Romain Tower, Full Sun, Harmony of Blue and Gold The Water Lily Pond 1899 Stacks of Wheat (Snow Effect, Overcast Day)1890-91
smiliesal
ART. What does a grade 8 - 9 GCSE Art sketchbook look like?

ART. What does a grade 8 - 9 GCSE Art sketchbook look like?

Are you worried about the new 1 to 9 GCSE Art gradings being used at the end of the academic year? This slideshow might help. An example of a grade 8 - 9 GCSE sketchbook. This example is work produced by a boy. The work fully covers all four Assessment Objectives and demonstrates high levels of skill and understanding. Ideal as a guide for students and teachers alike.
StartEducation
ART. What does a Grade 9 GCSE Art sketchbook look like?

ART. What does a Grade 9 GCSE Art sketchbook look like?

Are you worried about the new 1 to 9 GCSE Art gradings being used at the end of the academic year? This slideshow might help. A clear example of a grade 9 GCSE sketchbook. The work fully covers all four Assessment Objectives and demonstrates high levels of skill and understanding. Ideal as a guide for students and teachers alike.
StartEducation
ART. COMPLETE ART CURRICULUM FOR KS2 and KS3

ART. COMPLETE ART CURRICULUM FOR KS2 and KS3

The Complete Art Curriculum updated for 2017-18 to include 11 slideshows of supporting images. This huge resource offers 144 pages of detailed Art lesson plans in a linked format and hundreds of images for inspiration. Suitable for both KS2 and 3. Each lesson includes a clear step by step guide for teacher, materials lists, artist references and an easy to follow information sheet for students. Themes covered include drawing styles, tonal work, painting, clay work, papier-mâché, observational work, figure drawing, portraiture, pattern, landscape, masks ..... and much more. Images include architecture, people, natural forms, space, graffiti and many more.
StartEducation
Agitate, Educate, Organise - Citizenship Learning Resources on William Morris and Campaigning

Agitate, Educate, Organise - Citizenship Learning Resources on William Morris and Campaigning

A collection of resources from the William Morris Gallery. The materials include student worksheets background information for teachers and presentations for KS2 and KS4. These resources have been developed with a visit to the gallery in mind, but they will also provide an sound reference point for anyone wanting to know more about the role of William Morris as an activist and campaigner. We also offer workshops Agitate, Educate, Organise! Key Stages 3 and 4 Citizenship/PSHE 90 - 180 minutes William Morris combined his passion for decorative arts with a belief in the need for social change. Students will explore campaign methods adopted by Morris and compare these to contemporary campaigns. They will develop an activity to address a Citizenship issue: how to make their voice heard, make a difference and bring about change. http://www.wmgallery.org.uk/learning/secondary-workshops Inspiring a Campaign Key Stage 2 Citizenship/PSHE 90 - 150 minutes Morris was a powerful campaigner for social justice and his influence is still cited today by leading activists and thinkers. Students explore Morris’s political pamphlets and posters, comparing them with today’s protest art, before presenting a campaign close to their hearts. http://www.wmgallery.org.uk/learning/primary-workshops All images contained within these documents remain copyright of the William Morris Gallery. As such they may be used for educational purposes but should not be used for any commercial gain.
sharon_trotter
Vincent Van Gogh Timeline

Vincent Van Gogh Timeline

Timeline of Van Gogh's life including dates (month/year). The timeline is already mixed up, ready to use for pupils to sort correctly! It takes you from his birth to death and includes important periods in his life. NB: This was created using the 'XCCW joined font' so may appear different from the initial design if you do not have this font installed. Enjoy
ashleyclayton90
Berthe Morisot Mary Cassatt Marie Bracquemond Impression - 3 Grand Dames - 214 SLIDES

Berthe Morisot Mary Cassatt Marie Bracquemond Impression - 3 Grand Dames - 214 SLIDES

This is a complete presentation on Berthe Morisot Mary Cassatt Marie Bracquemond Impression - 3 Grand Dames. THERE ARE MANY ACTUAL SLIDES FOR YOUR REVIEW ON THIS PAGE. THIS IS YOUR BEST INDICATION OF PRODUCT QUALITY. EXCERPT: Gustave Geffroy in 1894 called them les trois grandes dames of Impressionism. This roughly translates to the three great ladies. He was referring to Mary Cassatt, alongside Marie Bracquemond, and Berthe Morisot. The Impressionists did admit these three women painters into their midst. They exhibited along with the men. Morisot and Cassatt were especially fortunate. They both came from the upper class, which gave them more resources upon which to rely. They also had very prominent artists watching out for them. Morisot became part of the upper class Manet family. Cassatt was friends with Degas and Pissarro. Both women had similar subject matter but they did not have much choice in subject matter. There were so many subjects they were not allowed to paint that only a few subjects were left. Both thus used many domestic scenes plus studies of women and children. Their manner of treating that subject was different though which rather matched their life circumstances being different. Cassatt remained single with no children. Although Cassatt always featured a lot of mothers and children in her work, infants with their mothers came to dominate her work in her later career. She particularly liked leaving the infant nude. Morisot was married and had one child, Julie. Morisot painted Julie a lot at all ages but tended to paint girls or young women instead of babies. Morisot painted no nude infants. She did venture into painting a nude adult woman though. Another difference between the two women was that Morisot could paint women in intimate moments which were softly erotic. Cassatt had no soft eroticism in her work. Most of her artistic intimate moments were between mother and child. One comes to appreciate how fortunate Morisot and Cassatt were in their artistic endeavors when one compares them to Marie Bracquemond. She is often not mentioned as an Impressionist painter but this is because of her controlling husband, Felix. He disliked her Impressionist art and made sure very little of it survived. Felix Bracquemond was also an artist who was jealous of her ability. His own painting never amounted to anything but he did enjoy some success as a printer in his day.
carolirvin
Face Jugs, an African American Tradition

Face Jugs, an African American Tradition

A ceramics project in which students study the African American tradition of Face Jugs, focusing on the potter Jim McDowell and then design and make their own ceramic face jug. Some prior learning in the hand-building of ceramic forms is needed. The downloads include 3 editable lesson plans supported by two Power Point Presentations with links to three Youtube videos and also seven pictures to use as starters.
marttheart
Design Eras from the last 100 years

Design Eras from the last 100 years

A powerpoint presentation of some of the main art and design eras of the last 100 years. It includes: Cubism, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Bauhaus, Sixties, Seventies, Eighties, Nineties, 21st Century design. On each slide there are examples of the sort of style it is and then below are modern designs that are inspired by the era itself. The presentation includes art work, furniture, graphics and architecture in it's examples. Perfect for a whistle stop tour of design in the last century!
sussexsarah
Edgar Degas Impressionism Art History 180 Slides

Edgar Degas Impressionism Art History 180 Slides

This is a complete presentation on Edgar Degas Impressionist Artist. THERE ARE MANY ACTUAL SLIDES FOR YOUR REVIEW ON THIS PAGE. THIS IS YOUR BEST INDICATION OF PRODUCT QUALITY. EXCERPT: "Mlle. Fiocre in the Ballet La Source," 1867-1868, oil on canvas, was the big break in painting which Degas needed. It enabled him to leave history painting and pursue his ballet subjects instead. The painting is not Impressionist. That was still to come. It is based on the ballet that opened the Palais Garnier in Paris in 1866. It was lavishly produced and with real horses. Paris’s hottest dancer, Eugénie Fiocre, played the role of the Georgian queen. The highlight of the painting was the pool of water. It was achieved through a mistake. Degas neglected to add the stage lighting effects to it. He noticed this on his way out the door to deliver the painting to the 1868 Paris Salon. He tried to fix his mistake but, when he varnished it, it was still wet. Thus, when he wiped at the varnish to fix his mistake, pigment was also removed. That was how the luminous sheet of water was created. He was stuck with it. He turned the onstage pool into a shining mirror that covered almost half the painting. It became the painting’s most popular feature.
carolirvin
Quality Management System Bundle 1

Quality Management System Bundle 1

Covers: 1) Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), 2) Component Identification, 3) Product and Service Specifications, 4) Product and Service Datasheets, 5) Product and Service Assembly.
biznetworker
100 Eye-Pooping Science and Technology Projects for Your Entire Session!

100 Eye-Pooping Science and Technology Projects for Your Entire Session!

"Active learning" means students engage with the material, participate in the class, and collaborate with each other. Don't expect your students simply to listen and memorize; instead, have them help demonstrate a process, analyze an argument, or apply a concept to a real-world situation. Students learn through their participation in the attainment of knowledge by gathering information and processing it by solving problems and articulating what they have discovered. Each activity below provides students with opportunities to deepen their learning by applying concepts and articulating new knowledge and many of these activities also provide the instructor feedback about the students’ learning. Whether you’re facing a lecture hall filled with 300 students or a seminar table with 15 students, one of your primary goals for the class should be to actively engage students with the material. Students learn more when they participate in the process of learning, whether it’s through discussion, practice, review, or application (Grunert, 1997). This is in stark contrast to traditional styles of teaching, where students are expected to sit for hours, listening and, theoretically, absorbing information presented by the instructor. Incorporate active learning strategies into every component of your course design. For example, encouraging short partner discussions during lectures (i.e., think-pair-share), adding problem- or case-based research projects to the curriculum, and incorporating time for small-group critical analysis exercises during seminars are all great ways to actively engage students in learning.
ozmatts12