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CS/IT Revision Mats

CS/IT Revision Mats

Please use these mats as a revision games to play in groups in the classroom. They should be printed on A3 paper and laminated so that it can be re-used. This means that students can write their initials on their square instead of using counters. The way the game is played can be manipulated. However, the main instructions are as follows (also included on sheet): Roll Two Die to Create a Co-ordinate. Place your coloured counter on the square that the roll corresponds to. If answer is correct, receive points as follows: Points: Red squares are worth 1, Yellow squares score 2 points, and Green squares score 5 points Grades: Red squares are 4/5 Grade, Yellow squares and 6/7 Grade and Green Squares and 8/9 Grade answers Please use a great revision resource for group work. Please also leave any feedback for future revision mats and how to improve them.
14bensona
CS/IT Revision Mat: Problem Solving

CS/IT Revision Mat: Problem Solving

Please use this mat as a revision game to play in groups in the classroom. This should be printed on A3 paper and laminated so that it can be re-used. This means that students can write their initials on their square instead of using counters. The way the game is played can be manipulated. However, the main instructions are as follows (also included on sheet): Roll Two Die to Create a Co-ordinate. Place your coloured counter on the square that the roll corresponds to. If answer is correct, receive points as follows: Points: Red squares are worth 1, Yellow squares score 2 points, and Green squares score 5 points Grades: Red squares are 4/5 Grade, Yellow squares and 6/7 Grade and Green Squares and 8/9 Grade answers Please use a great revision resource for group work. Please also leave any feedback for future revision mats and how to improve them.
14bensona
Computing Conference! 24th February 2018 with Ofsted! For anyone who teaches computing!

Computing Conference! 24th February 2018 with Ofsted! For anyone who teaches computing!

We are running our annual teachers' conference on the 24th February 2018. THIS IS THE FLYER. You need to book a place for £35 on eventbrite!!! The flyer gives you the link! John Nixon, Computing Lead at Ofsted is providing our keynote. This is the only conference he is scheduled to present at this year!! At the conference, you can create your own day of CPD. For beginners, intermediates and more experienced teachers of computing. For primary and secondary teachers, trainees as well as in-service and out of school educators. SEND workshops, A level workshops - all you can think of. We are even making a swarm of fireflies out of 200 micro bits and have drones too! 9:10 registration, 9:45 Ofsted Keynote, 10:20 1st workshop, 4:15 finishes Gladesmore Community School, South Tottenham, N15 6BF (Victoria line) Just £35 to cover lunch/admin Select from 30 HANDS-ON workshops Unplugged, Scratch, Minecraft, Python, HTML, C#, MicroBit and more Sessions include: Advanced Python - Sue Sentance, Stride - Michael Kölling, Machine Learning - Paul Curzon, Primary Assessment - Phil Bagge, Minecraft - Simon Johnson (CLCSimon), NEWLY ADDED Secondary - Craig ‘n’ Dave Sign up here https://tinyurl.com/CASLondon-Conf-2018 #casconf2018 CAS London​ coordinates Computing At School activities in London. CAS London is run by King’s College London and Queen Mary University of London. http://www.computingatschool.org.uk/crcs/london @cas_london_crc email caslondon@computingatschool.org.uk
jlisaw8
Algorithms, Maths & micro:bit: 5 fun coding activities

Algorithms, Maths & micro:bit: 5 fun coding activities

5 fun activities exploring the micro:bit, mathematics, and algorithm creation in Python and JavaScript Blocks. This short activity booklet explores the use of computing in order to calculate mathematical constants and carry out advanced mathematical functions. This could be used as an introduction to algorithms or mathematics & computing. In these activities we will use Python and JavaScript Blocks to calculate Pi & e, as well as creating a function to calculate factorials. Along the way we will learn a number of key skills: - Introducing & breaking down problems and algorithms - Solving and re-arranging equations - Real-world use of computing - Introduction to mathematical constants - Coding in Python & JavaScript Blocks - Utilising key equations for geometry & shapes - Memory issues & efficiency - Coding Skills: - Variables - Loops - Conditions - Advanced mathematical functions
rlowe0008
Digital Skills

Digital Skills

A collection of digital skills progression documents and lessons. Learn unplugged coding, blogging and iMovie skills.
ferrycaptain
Let's Start Coding: Programmer's Notebook for Grades 6-8

Let's Start Coding: Programmer's Notebook for Grades 6-8

The Let's Start Coding Programmer's Notebook contains real-life application questions pertaining to how real, typed code is used in the world around us. The Programmer's Notebook also contains a C++ code cheat sheet for students to use in identifying correct functions and statements. The Programmer's Notebook also has an alphabetically arranged coding glossary for students to use to fill out definitions in their own words and to write examples. This resource can be used with or without the Let's Start Coding kits found at www.letsstartcoding.com
LetsStartCoding
Let's Start Coding: Grades 4-5 Programmer's Notebook

Let's Start Coding: Grades 4-5 Programmer's Notebook

The Let's Start Coding Programmer's Notebook contains real-life application questions pertaining to how real, typed code is used in the world around us. The Programmer's Notebook also contains a C++ code cheat sheet for students to use in identifying correct functions and statements. The Programmer's Notebook also has an alphabetically arranged coding glossary for students to use to fill out definitions in their own words and to write examples. This resource can be used with or without the Let's Start Coding kits found at www.letsstartcoding.com
LetsStartCoding
Micro:Bit differentiated worksheets - Year 7/8

Micro:Bit differentiated worksheets - Year 7/8

PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW! Six lessons worth of content, each lesson has a high, medium and low ability worksheet and each lesson gets progressively harder. Most projects work with the block editor or touch develop. These worksheets have been printed and laminated and pupils choose the worksheet based on their ability.
gemw444
Microbit Unit of Work

Microbit Unit of Work

This Unit of Work includes 10 lessons worth of Microbit programming skills and knowledge. Each lesson has a PowerPoint presentation to go with it, with all other resources also included as Word documents. All resources including PowerPoints are numbered to make it easier to follow the unit, and there is also a teacher’s guide included. The Unit begins with an introduction to Microbits, and concludes with revision, end of unit test and DIRT reflection lesson. Topics included are Variables, Selection, Iteration, and various programming challenges in the form of games that the students can create. It also includes the Microbit Board Game project that takes 2 lessons, which is also available from the Programmer’s Paradise shop on TES Resources. A homework is also included, where the students can create a program using printed code blocks, cut and stick them onto the other half of the paper. This can be used after the first couple of lessons, or later if they are less familiar with the concepts.
MrHawes8
Microbit Programming Assessment

Microbit Programming Assessment

Included is an assessment for the end of a microbit programming unit. Topics included variables, selection, definite and indefinite iteration. The test also includes specific practical knowledge of programming using microbit blocks.
MrHawes8
Microbit Revision Lesson

Microbit Revision Lesson

This presentation is to be used for revising programming concepts such as variables, selection, iteration using the microbit. There are tasks included such as creating definitions, thinking about how to program a certain game and a Kahoot quiz (link included on the powerpoint).
MrHawes8
Microbit Iteration Lesson 2

Microbit Iteration Lesson 2

This resource is a PowerPoint presentation that helps to reinforce definite vs. indefinite iteration, and also includes instructions for creating a game for the microbit. Complete code blocks shown in the PowerPoint.
MrHawes8
Microbit Iteration lesson

Microbit Iteration lesson

This resource is a PowerPoint presentation used to teach iteration for students using the Microbit. The main task involves students programming definite and indefinite iteration through the use of two different looping blocks of code.
MrHawes8
Microbit Selection Lesson

Microbit Selection Lesson

This resource is a PowerPoint used to teach a lesson on Selection statements using the Microbit. The lesson revolves around the students creating a 'Magic 8 Ball' game, using If...Then...Else blocks of code.
MrHawes8
Microbit Click Wars Lesson - flowchart included

Microbit Click Wars Lesson - flowchart included

This lesson includes the PowerPoint needed to have the students create a game called Click Wars, and the flowchart card sort activity alongside it. Also included is the instruction sheet for the students to work from, and a Word document containing the coded solutions.
MrHawes8
Microbit Introduction Lesson

Microbit Introduction Lesson

Included in this resource is the PowerPoint used to introduce the microbit to a class, and some simple coding tasks to get the students using the microbits early on in the unit. Another PowerPoint is included for the final task, which is a selection of programming challenges for students to attempt.
MrHawes8
Microbit Board Game Project

Microbit Board Game Project

This resource was used for Year 7 Computing following a unit involving learning about variables, selection, iteration and random number generation using the Microbit. They loved playing the game, especially as they helped to create it! The idea is to have them use the Microbit as part of the board game. They will program in a dice function for shaking the Microbit, and other features for when they press Button A or B. The game works similarly to Snakes and Ladders. Button A moves the player either forwards or backwards, 6, 4, or 2 spaces (picked randomly by the program), and Button B moves the player up or down by flashing up to 3 up or down arrows (again randomly). Instructions were given via a worksheet, where the first page (two of the tasks) were given in the first lesson and the final one was given at the start of the second. When they had finished their program they could then download it to the Microbit and play their game. My students ended up with between 10-25 minutes playing time depending on how quickly they programmed their game. They can provide their own playing pieces from pencil cases etc. and the board is provided (A4 printout is fine). The code is in the screenshots in the PowerPoint slides and can be made up quickly.
MrHawes8
3 x lessons

3 x lessons

Hardware, software and utility software presentations, used with year 9 computer science classes.
maxwell01782
The Enigma Machine

The Enigma Machine

In the Enigma Machine lesson, students will learn the intricacies of cryptography used in World War II to convey secret messages to soldiers in the field. Students will start by looking at a simple shift cipher and will create their own cipher wheel to send and receive encoded messages. Students will then learn about the German Enigma Machine and will run a web-based emulated version to better understand how it works. Finally, students will discover how the Allies broke the Enigma’s code in WWII and the effect that had on winning the war. Part of this lesson was adapted from a lesson plan by Northern Illinois University. Topics addressed: Basic cryptography and relevant vocabulary Shift ciphers and how they encode plain text using a simple algorithm The Enigma Machine and its impact on the outcome of World War II Primary CT concept: algorithms. Students will consider different algorithms used in various forms of cryptography, including the very complicated logic involved in the Enigma Machine. Students will be able to: Explain why cryptography is necessary to keep messages secret Explain the algorithm of a simple shift cipher Understand at a high level how the Enigma Machine operates Understand at a high level how the Enigma Machine was defeated Materials: PowerPoint presentation Shift cipher template and instructions Suggested lesson breakdown: 10-15min – introduction to cryptography 10-15min – students create and test cipher wheels 5min – discussion on shift cipher 7min – Enigma Machine video 10min – Enigma Machine web emulator 10min – Cracking the Enigma Machine video
eli17
Microbit - "The Next Big Thing" unit (18 lessons with resources)

Microbit - "The Next Big Thing" unit (18 lessons with resources)

This is an 18 lesson unit of work around Microbits, combining programming using the online microbit interface and electronic components. The components I used were sourced from http://microbit-accessories.co.uk but you could make your own or source from elsewhere as well. Helpsheets are provided for each of the electronic components. The students each have a workbook for the whole unit divided into sections that can be easily marked by the teacher, with opportunity/space for student reflection and response. Students start off learning about microbit theory, i.e. safe handling (static) and polarity, inputs, outputs and programming structures IF statements and loops. They then need to design the "next big thing" - a device that solves a problem, using the microbit. They will need to produce a design brief and circuit diagram. Once they have built it, there is a lesson on gathering user feedback and evaluation. At the end of the unit, they have the opportunity to create a business pitch for their new device. This is a great end to the unit as each student/group gets to share their creation to the rest of the class, with prizes for the best entries (at teacher's discretion!) The course mainly links towards the D&T criteria (with reference to the relevant criteria at the end of each powerpoint) but could be used in Computing as well.
jonmward
List of programming techniques

List of programming techniques

List of all the programming techniques required for GCSE and A Level Computing; what do the students need to learn or show as part of the evidence in controlled assessments or Computing courseworks
sekhon1976
Year 2: Master Computing Basics Bundle

Year 2: Master Computing Basics Bundle

A huge amount of resources for individual or Interactive Whiteboard use for Year 1 children. Gain confidence with easy to use, drag and drop resources across a variety of topics including a whole unit on Coding!
martinjgoulden
micro:bit of Things

micro:bit of Things

https://sites.google.com/view/microbitofthings This is a website for anyone who has their hands on a micro:bit (microbit) and wants to know what they can do with it. I created the site to publish notes on projects that I am working on with my pupils, so this site will be of interest to teachers who are looking for ideas and advice that will enable them to exploit the capabilities of their micro:bits. The projects have been piloted with children in Key Stage 2 or Key Stage 3 and many are now embedded into the STEM curriculum at my school. They have been designed with tight budgets in mind.
hastklass
Embedded Systems  ARDUINO    GENUINO Project Pelican crossing light sequence

Embedded Systems ARDUINO GENUINO Project Pelican crossing light sequence

Embedded Systems ARDUINO GENUINO Simulations Example 1 https://circuits.io/circuits/2653871-traffic-lights-pelican-crossing-light-sequence Example 2 https://circuits.io/circuits/2678909-traffic-lights-pelican-crossing-with-audio-annunciator VIDEO CAR https://youtu.be/kfFL0o7Mcoo TRUCK https://youtu.be/AcvDFVBnydA MICROCONTROLLER SYSTEM: http://www.learningkeystages.co.uk/ Internet Reference: https://www.arduino.cc/ Simulator development: http://www.123dapp.com/circuits ------------------------------------------------< SOFTWARE > TITLE: Pelican crossing light sequence AUTHOR: Mr Adrian Ashley B.Sc. (Hons) M.Sc. SOFTWARE OBJECTIVES: This application will simulate a Pelican crossing light sequence. The systems was developed in a simulation http://www.123dapp.com/circuits Using a simulated Arduino to develop the software. REFERENCE: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/HomePage http://www.123dapp.com/circuits http://www.learningkeystages.co.uk/
AdrianAshley
Micro:bit Tutorial Development

Micro:bit Tutorial Development

Micro:bit Tutorial Development by Mr Adrian Ashley B.Sc(Hons) M.Sc Developing tutorial books and software for the micro:bit embedded system http://www.learningkeystages.co.uk/ External Circuits Example http://fritzing.org/projects/micorbit-ldr Android mobile App on Google Play https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.samsung.microbit&hl=en_GB iphone mobile app https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/micro-bit/id1092687276?mt=8 https://www.microbit.co.uk/ https://www.microbit.co.uk/create-code https://www.microbit.co.uk/getting-started https://www.microbit.co.uk/teachers-and-parents
AdrianAshley
Ozobot Printable Coding Stickers

Ozobot Printable Coding Stickers

This is a jam packed file full of moves for the Ozobot! The included files can be easily printed on labels to make coding the Ozobot easy! These precoded files make it easy for anyone to create awesome tracks for the Ozobot to run! **In the zip file I have included the sticker type that these ozocodes were formatted! Just print and play! Files Included: Cool Moves ozobot_BackWalk.doc ozobot_Spin.doc ozobot_Tornado.doc ozobot_Zigzag.doc Direction ozobot_goleft.doc ozobot_goright.doc ozobot_gostraight.doc ozobot_linejumpleft.doc ozobot_linejumpright.doc ozobot_linejumpstraight.doc ozobot_U_turn_Line_end.doc ozobot_U_turn.doc Speed ozobotcruise.doc ozobotfast.doc ozobotnitroboost.doc ozobotslow.doc ozobotsnaildose.doc ozobotturbo.doc ozobot_Pause 3 sec.doc Timers ozobot_Timer_Off.doc ozobot_TimerOn_30sec.doc
lynnbradley11
School Robot Challenge 2016 - Design your own Robot Bug (age 13+)

School Robot Challenge 2016 - Design your own Robot Bug (age 13+)

Welcome to School Robot Challenge 2016 The competition is open to all schoolchildren and students in the UK, and involves designing your own virtual robot bug and teaching it to move. There is an option of 3D printing your robot bug. There will be winners in the categories age 13-17 and 18+. A panel of judges consisting of leading designers and engineers will select the winning designs. The competition aims to provide a compelling introduction to computer-aided design and bio-inspired design. To enter the competition, you will need a pencil, paper, a way of taking digital photos and a Mac or PC with an internet connection. To take part in the competition you will need to download a free software package. This information booklet is designed for schoolchildren and students aged 13+. Entries must be received by 23:00 13 June 2016. Winners will be announced by 4 July 2016. Enjoy the competition!
UKRoboticsWeek
BBC micro:bit challenges

BBC micro:bit challenges

A series of worksheets for the BBC micro:bit. Each has a task brief, suggested blocks to use and some extension suggestions. Each has been given a nominal difficulty level (based on my judgment). The idea is not to give step-by-step instructions but present a set of relevant 'Lego blocks' to put together in the correct order. The blocks appear on the sheet approximately in order, but pupils will need to think about the order and may need to edit specific text or values. Where similar blocks are needed (such as strings for 'win' and 'lose'), they may only be shown once. 'Solutions 1' is a set of screenshots of my ideas on how to meet the briefs. It is not comprehensive; in particular, few of the more 'basic' solutions are shown. The solutions may not all be optimal. It is called 'Solutions 1' in the optimistic reckoning that more challenges may yet come! Example-solutions.doc is NOT a document file. It is actually a Zip of tokenised files for working versions of the worksheets which can be loaded into the BBC's online editor. (To use, download the file and change the extension from DOC to ZIP.) Do bear in mind that there may be more efficient ways to achieve the same result (not least by converting from the Block Editor to Touch Develop). This is something that bright pupils might want to investigate, especially for harder tasks or to change how long images/text display on screen. The files with CC in the name are based on activities suggested by Code Club, but using the Microsoft Block Editor (not Code Kingdoms JavaScript). [24/5/16 solutions screenshots added.]
madalien
Introduction to Micro:Bit Computing

Introduction to Micro:Bit Computing

I hope that my Pupil Booklet and Planning will be useful for those teachers working out a basic introduction of the Micro:Bit. I have used many of the excellent resources on the Micro:Bit website but added some key instructions for my own school network. Please do feedback any suggestions and improvements as this is very much the fist hit at a SOW.
rlock39
OCR A452 Practical Investigation THEORY - Machine Code versus High Level Code

OCR A452 Practical Investigation THEORY - Machine Code versus High Level Code

GCSE OCR A452 Practical Investigation THEORY What is Machine Language? Machine Code versus High Level Code Explain the difference between high level code and machine code Explain the need for translators to convert high level code to machine code Describe the characteristics of an assembler, a compiler and an interpreter TWO Worksheets: Machine Code worksheet 1 Machine Code worksheet 2 ANSWERS for BOTH Worksheets: Machine Code worksheet ANSWERS 1 Machine Code worksheet ANSWERS 2
Leetax
BBC Micro:Bit project ideas

BBC Micro:Bit project ideas

This is a link to a crowd sourced document containing Micro:Bit Projects. All year 7 pupils will be receiving a free BBC Micro:Bit. Here are some ideas for Secondary Computing Lessons. Note many projects are cross-curricular and most have strong Design and Technology (DT) elements.
jlisaw8
Flashing a LED with the Raspberry Pi

Flashing a LED with the Raspberry Pi

Unlike typical PCs the Raspberry Pi invites you to add external electronic circuits, components and devices. Learn how to use ScratchGPIO to flash a LED (light emitting diode) and then program a switch to turn it on and off. Many other resources are available here: computing-made-simple.co.uk/resources/
primarycomputing
A basic introduction to Linux

A basic introduction to Linux

The Raspberry Pi is usually used with the Raspbian operating system, which is a variant of Debian – a Linux distribution. The following guide is a very simple, first steps introduction to a few commands that can be used with a Linux system. It includes loggin in, changing directory, using a simple text editor, installing software and shutting down. Many other resources are available here: computing-made-simple.co.uk/resources/
primarycomputing
Little Man Computer (LMC) Coding

Little Man Computer (LMC) Coding

An introduction to Little Man Computer (LMC), what it is, how it works, and how to get coding in it! Part 1 introduces you to the interface, the functionality and also looks at the basic commands.
MissComputing
Digital Schoolhouse - Let's Doodle: What will you create today?

Digital Schoolhouse - Let's Doodle: What will you create today?

This is a computing lesson with a difference. This cross-curricular workshop developed with 3Doodler involves no programming, but covers every strand of the Computational Thinking Framework and allows pupils to accelerate and work towards Key Stage 3 strands in the Programmes of Study. The new D&T Programmes of Study are also partially covered at both Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3. Pupils begin the day by constructing simple models with Playdough before manipulating them to cover decomposition and algorithmic thinking in the Computational Thinking Framework. Pupils quickly move onto developing their skills with the 3Doodler and begin by creating 2D models using stencils. Pupils then develop their own ideas, carrying out algorithmic thinking by designing, testing and evaluating their own stencils before making an object that they have designed. Pupils then evaluate the success of their work before identifying patterns and using generalisation to adapt their stencils.
Shahneila