GCSE Computer Science: Taboo words (185 terms, 6 topics)

GCSE Computer Science: Taboo words (185 terms, 6 topics)

Banned Words is similar to the games Taboo ™ or Forbidden Words ™. Students must get their teammates to guess key words by giving a definition without using certainly banned words. Great for improving language and explanation skills, and for ESL pupils. This game works well for starters and plenaries. This pack contains fully editable Banned Words PowerPoints for 6 Computer Science topics with almost 200 key terms, plus a separate game file with all topics combined. Two samples are also available on TES for free. This electronic version of the game saves printing and laminating cards. The presentation can be shown to a student on the teacher’s computer. When the presentation is run, key terms will be selected in a random order until each one has been used exactly once. Topics included: Hardware (42 terms) Software (19 terms) Data Representation (29 terms) Algorithms & Programming (38 terms) Networks & The Internet (44 terms) The Bigger Picture (13 terms) Each PowerPoint is fully editable so you can easily add your own terms. A blank template is included to create your own games based on your chosen topics. Notes: The random-slide function will ensure each slide is selected exactly once. For the random-slide functionality to work you must: Enable Macros when opening the presentation Click the blue arrows to change slide (not the cursor keys on the keyboard)
csteacher2048
GCSE Computer Science: Taboo words game (Data representation)

GCSE Computer Science: Taboo words game (Data representation)

Banned Words is similar to the games Taboo ™ or Forbidden Words ™. Students must get their teammates to guess key words by giving a definition without using certainly banned words. Great for improving language and explanation skills, and for ESL pupils. This game works well for starters and plenaries. This fully editable Banned Words PowerPoint contains terms covering the Data Representation topic. You can also download this resource as part of a pack covering 185 terms and 6 topics (see below). This electronic version of the game saves printing and laminating cards. The presentation can be shown to a student on the teacher’s computer. When the presentation is run, key terms will be selected in a random order until each one has been used exactly once. A blank template is included to create your own games based on your chosen topics. Notes: The random-slide function will ensure each slide is selected exactly once. For the random-slide functionality to work you must: Enable Macros when opening the presentation Click the blue arrows to change slide (not the cursor keys on the keyboard)
csteacher2048
Raspberry Pi Project - Seven Segment LED (uses of binary registers)

Raspberry Pi Project - Seven Segment LED (uses of binary registers)

This project demonstrates how a binary code can be used to create a digital display When teaching about the uses of binary registers at (I)GCSE, I sometimes find that pupils find it a little difficult to appreciate. I created this quick project which uses a Raspberry Pi and a seven-segment LED. The GPIO interface is hidden in the Python (class) file and you don’t need to worry about how that works if you don’t want to. I have included instructions (including pin set up), the Python class file and a demo program. NB As always, when using GPIO pins, you must run the Python program using elevated privileges (superuser do) at a command prompt, e.g. sudo python3 test_SSeg.py
jambobex
Data Representation Practice

Data Representation Practice

This activity this aimed at KS4 students, it is ideal as an extended homework task or a class task to help teach: Binary, Denary Hex conversions Binary additional File size conversions
Rethink_Education
How does electricity flow through small objects: KS4 - Logically Speaking

How does electricity flow through small objects: KS4 - Logically Speaking

Currently, electronic switches in the form of transistors and diodes are the building blocks for computers and other electronic devices. Scientists at the University of Oxford are researching how electricity flows in nanoscale electronics. In the future it may be possible to create electronic switches that are based on individual molecules. In this lesson students find out a bit more about the development of electronic components over the years and are introduced to logic gates and truth tables. Learning outcomes: Students are able to recall that computers are made up of components that have become smaller and more efficient over time. Students are able to predict the outputs of basic logic gates given specific inputs. Students are able to create and interpret truth tables for simple logic gates. See more at: www.oxfordsparks.ox.ac.uk/content/how-does-electricity-flow-through-small-objects
OxfordUniversity
What are quantum rainbows: KS4 - Let's Get Digital

What are quantum rainbows: KS4 - Let's Get Digital

Much of our modern life involves receiving and transmitting data; watching TV, posting on social media, sending emails etc. Although we might want to receive something complicated like sound and moving images, in order to process and send the information it is first converted into a set of numbers. The numbers are stored and processed on the computer as binary code which consists of only two options, usually written as 1 and 0. This is often referred to as binary or digital. This lesson looks at how sound can be encoded into digital form. Learning Outcomes: Sound waves can be represented visually on an oscilloscope or similar. How amplitude and wavelength are related to volume and pitch. To store and process sound, computers have to convert analogue signals such as sound waves into numbers (digital). See more at: www.oxfordsparks.ox.ac.uk/content/what-are-quantum-rainbows
OxfordUniversity
What are quantum rainbows: KS3 - Colour Coded

What are quantum rainbows: KS3 - Colour Coded

A huge amount of data is transmitted and received using light down fibre optic cables. Currently that information is sent digitally using binary code (i.e the light can be ‘on’ or ‘off’ representing 1 or 0 respectively. Scientists from the QCUMbER project, led by the University of Oxford, are looking at clever ways to encode light with more ‘colour’ options than just on or off. Increasing the number of colour options, increases the amount of information each bit of light can convey. In this resource, students learn how information can be converted into code, such as binary (using 1s and 0s), or how using colours instead of just ‘on’ and ‘off’ can allow you to encode more information with fewer ‘bits’. Learning outcomes: Data is often converted into binary/digital code For light, binary means on or off If we could use ‘colours’ we could send more data with a single bit of light See more at: https://www.oxfordsparks.ox.ac.uk/content/what-are-quantum-rainbows
OxfordUniversity
Data Representation for OCR GCSE (9-1) in Computer Science (J276)

Data Representation for OCR GCSE (9-1) in Computer Science (J276)

Data Representation Student Workbook This student workbook is ideal for students, non-specialist teachers, NQTs any anyone who wants to learn more about data representation to gain confidence in the OCR GCSE (9-1) in Computer Science (J276) “2.6 Data representation” specification. Can be used in the classroom as a teaching aid, for self-study or as a revision tool. This 58-page PDF which covers the theory and includes ready-to-use tasks and even includes the answers. Table of Contents: • Units • Amount of storage space required • Numbers • Denary (base 10) • Binary (base 2) • Convert from binary to denary • Convert from denary to binary • Add binary numbers • Binary Shifts • Hexadecimal (base 16) • Why is hexadecimal used? • Convert from binary to hexadecimal • Convert hexadecimal to binary • Convert hexadecimal to denary • Convert from denary to hexadecimal • Number base notation • Check Digits • Characters • Binary codes to represent characters • Character Set • ASCII, extended ASCII and Unicode • Images • Pixels • Colour Depth • Metadata • Calculating file size • Converting binary into a bitmap • Sound • How sound can be sampled and stored in a digital form • Sample frequency / sample rate • Bit rate / Resolution • Calculate sound file sizes • Compression • Lossless • Lossy
nwilkin
Odometer Simulation - Encoding Negative Numbers

Odometer Simulation - Encoding Negative Numbers

This is a simulation intended to demonstrate the problem with encoding negative numbers in a computer system. It was created to use a starter activity with a sixth form class prior to teaching sign & magnitude, ones complement and twos complement encoding. The PowerPoint file includes instruction on slide 1. The rest of the ppt shows a dial such as you might find in a car odometer (or a combination lock, date stamp, etc) with numbers. The slides show they can be ‘dialed’ forwards or backwards. When dialled backwards past zero we get 9, not -1 because there is no negative symbol available. This is the same problem in a computer system. We have only 0 and 1, we don’t have a negative symbol available. So how do we ‘encode’ a negative number? It is also effective to have some code locks or date stamps available to give students to demonstrate the principle for themselves. This then leads into a problem solving discussion where the teacher can then introduce the idea of sign & magnitude one ones/twos complement.
astburyp
IGCSE Computer Science Exam Question Finder

IGCSE Computer Science Exam Question Finder

This is a work-in-progress I would appreciate feedback and suggestions for further development to make it as useful for CS teachers as possible. Intended for: TEACHERS of IGCSE Cambridge Computer Science Purpose: You want to quickly gather a set of past exam paper questions on the topic you’ve been teaching in IGCSE Computer Science. But there are so many past papers and you have to look through each one to decide which questions are appropriate. With this (unfinished as yet!) tool, you can select your syllabus topic and you’ll see which papers and question numbers you need to assign to students.
afitzpatrick1
OCR GCSE in Computer Science Component 1 (J276/01) student workbooks

OCR GCSE in Computer Science Component 1 (J276/01) student workbooks

These workbooks cover EVERYTHING outlined in the OCE specification for component 1 of the GCSE in Computer Science for OCR (J276/01) It includes the following workbooks: 1.1 System architecture 1.2 Memory and 1.3 Storage (combined into one workbook) 1.4 Wired and wireless networks 1.5 Network topologies, protocols and layers 1.6 System security 1.7 Systems software 1.8 Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns Each PDF workbook includes theory, tasks and all the answers so you and your students are confident you are covering the specification. Ideal for classwork, as homework tasks and as self-study revision aids. They are written in student-friendly language which breaks down technical topics into easy to understand chunks making these workbooks perfect for students, NQTs and non-specialist teachers.
nwilkin
Coding: IB Key Concepts Posters

Coding: IB Key Concepts Posters

This is a set of 8 IB KEY CONCEPT posters to help align the key concepts with coding concepts and terms. This is a great way of making connections from the Key Concepts to the topic of coding, and helping students to understand more about how coding relates to areas of their life and learning.
LyndsDive
J276 - Computer Science GCSE - Revision Question Cards

J276 - Computer Science GCSE - Revision Question Cards

I have created question cards for all topics in the OCR Computer Science GCSE (J276). These were used by my Year 11 Cohort, they have found them quite effective as support tools in lessons and revision at home. They work great for testing students knowledge after delivering a topic as well as extending questioning individually in lessons. I have created wall display that has each Topic Easy, Medium and Hard. This allows students to collect a question card to further their learning whenever they want too. I have used Blooms style questioning allowing for the testing of knowledge, application of knowledge and then applying it further. I have named these ‘Attained it…���, ‘Applied it…’ and ‘Advanced it…’ respectively. All the cards have been designed to be printed double sided on the short edge, This is so that the topic name is on the back. All cards are using the ‘OpenDyslexic’ font, this can be seen on the PDF’s. Formatting may differ on the publisher document if you do not have the font installed. This pack consists of the original publisher file’s as well as PDFs of all the cards too. I have also created a PDF of each set of cards that represent each separate paper of the OCR course, as well as one for all topics across the course. The content does not differ from the collective one to the individual in any way. Enjoy!
Davism1993
Binary for Computer Science and Maths

Binary for Computer Science and Maths

This lesson can be taught at Key Stage 3 or in Key Stage 4 computer Science. It is also a good refresher of the basics for A-level students. The presentation guides you through all of the key content and includes answers. You also gain a Spreadsheet that enables you to make tables and new questions very quickly as well as an investigation and links to a variety of binary games.
james_abela
1. KS4 Computer Science Homework OCR

1. KS4 Computer Science Homework OCR

I have created a booklet for each unit. Each booklet has specific and generic tasks along side around 15 exam questions. Students keep a record on the back of their homework and inside there are several pages for the students to complete the selected tasks.
laurenmillington
A Level Computer Science - Revision Placemat : Communication Methods

A Level Computer Science - Revision Placemat : Communication Methods

What’s the different between compilation & interpretation? What is source code? What does an assembler do? This printable A Level placemat takes you through a set of revision notes and tasks covering the topic of code translation in Computer Science. Presented with helpful QR codes to additional resources including my own set of digital flash cards for corresponding key terms.
hbillinghurst
Binary Coding Unplugged Task Cards Ascii

Binary Coding Unplugged Task Cards Ascii

These Binary Code Task Cards are perfect to help students learn how to encrypt and decrypt binary messages as well as understand binary code. They are great at engaging your students with problem solving and help support your computer teaching while unplugged/ Included in this resource are 32 Everyday objects to be converted into Binary Template to create your own Color and black and white version Answers have been included
Kiwilander
Exam Worksheets. Computer Science for IGCSE, GCSE and UK National Curriculum.

Exam Worksheets. Computer Science for IGCSE, GCSE and UK National Curriculum.

This Bundle includes the topics as follows: Conversion of Binary to Decimal Conversion of Decimal to Binary Conversion of Decimal to Hexa-decimal Conversion of Binary to Hexa-deimal Conversion of Hexa-decimal to Binary Conversion of Hexa-decimal to Decimal Calculating Memory Sizes for Bit, Nibble, Byte, KiloByte, MegaByte, GigaByte and TeraByte Construction/Drawing Conversion Table of Decimal, Binary, Octal and Hexa-decimal Use of basic 16 Hexa-colour codes and their Hex colour values
suas2016
1&2 Bit Binary Art

1&2 Bit Binary Art

This tool creates 10 by 10 one-bit-per-pixel or two-bits-per-pixel binary images from a binary string of 0 and 1s. The choice of colour palette is left to the user with a default black and white option. Works well with snipping tool to use as part of a computing science digital portfolio. could be used in a wide variety of lessons within the context of data representation.
OliverJennings
Binary and Hexadecimal for GCSE

Binary and Hexadecimal for GCSE

A high quality, complete course for the teaching of binary and hexadecimal concepts for GCSE. Students can scan the QR codes in the worksheet to see a video of the question being worked through, step-by-step, this ensures that all students of different ability levels can access the content and practice the skills. Contains: A full set of teaching presentations showing step-by-step how-to guides to each type of conversion (Keynote/PowerPoint/PDF) A comprehensive set of worksheets with explainers and QR code based video workthroughs (PDF) Front page (how-to guide) Binary to Denary Denary to Binary Binary Addition Binary Subtraction Hexadecimal to Denary Denary to Hexadecimal Binary to Hexadecimal Hexadecimal to Binary Bitwise Manipulation (Bit shifting) Answers One PDF file with all of the above Assessment set: Synoptic assessment (Word/PDF) Markscheme (Word/PDF) Markscheme workthrough (PDF) Question level analysis document (Excel) Guide to using the Question level analysis document This covers the specification for all major GCSE courses and can also be used for KS3 and the basis of KS4 Computer Science. Please feel free to mix and match as appropriate.
lessonhacker
OCR GCSE Computer Science Student eBook

OCR GCSE Computer Science Student eBook

Frustrated with the lack of a straightforward, to-the-point text book for this course (OCR GCSE Computer Science J276), I decided to compile the lesson resources that I have written over the past two years into this free eBook. Besides written content and diagrams to explain concepts, I have included links to many YouTube videos that will allow pupils to go deeper into topics and learn in ways other than just reading. You should be able to simply click on the image on all “Video” pages to link to the appropriate YouTube page straight from the PDF. This eBook is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International license, so please feel free to share it with others - teachers, pupils or whomever you think might be interested in it! However, if you do so, please do point them back to this page as means of attribution. This is the first resource that I have published on TES.com so I would love to receive your feedback, particularly if find it useful or if you have suggestions for improvement. I have worksheets that I have written for each topic with this spec that I hope to upload in due course. Other resources that might be useful to you If you do find this eBook useful, you may be interested in my YouTube channel where I have produced a number of original videos to explain Computer Science topics as well as put together playlists of great videos from other YouTubers: https://www.youtube.com/mrawdimmick Finally, if you are teaching GCSE Computer Science then you might be interested in my online Python course hosted on repl.it. As a “community” classroom you can point your students directly to it for some self-learning or you can “Import and Teach” the class into your own Repl.it Classroom for you to invite your pupils to join so that you can track their progress and provide feedback on their work: https://repl.it/community/classrooms/29589
adimmick
Year 7 End of Year Exam Feedback

Year 7 End of Year Exam Feedback

This is a feedback resource to go with another user’s exam. The link to the exam is https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/year-7-end-of-year-exam-computing-with-mark-scheme-11351763
sam9486
Interactive Logic Gate Learning resource WIP

Interactive Logic Gate Learning resource WIP

I have created an interactive learning resources for logic gates and boolean algebra . It contains 10 puzzles to solve and it’s a work in progress but is hopefully (**after some more bug fixes **) now fully working and has been checked for bugs. It is an .exe file. The presentation still needs improving but thought I would throw it out there and see what people think. You are welcome to use it with your classes just make sure both files are placed in the same folder for the .exe to run. New version, you can now drag gates after the set them down by left clicking and holding on gates! Please support me with reviews and constructive feedback, this will encourage further improvements.
axepage1