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Scarlet and Ivy: Mystery Story Writing

Scarlet and Ivy: Mystery Story Writing

Here is some more developed thinking about what can be found in a mystery story (some of these points may overlap with your earlier ideas). a) Tick any number of the ones you agree with and add more to the list if you can. b) With support from the points on the previous page, use the following line, taken from ‘Ivy and Scarlet, The Lost Twin’, to open your own mystery writing scene. Then in no more than 500 words either produce an entirely new opening to a story or a scene from the middle of a story.
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Scarlet and Ivy: Diary Writing

Scarlet and Ivy: Diary Writing

Either: Write your own diary extracts, written in a chatty informal style using the first person ‘I’, based on some of your own school highlights – you plan to hide this secret diary hidden in a disused locker knowing it will not be found for many years. Or: Write some extracts of Scarlet’s diary written at Rosemoor Asylum for Young females. To help set a sense of place if you are writing as Scarlet (80 years ago) as a prisoner in an Asylum, look at the rough map Scarlet could have managed to draw based on what she can see from her tiny room, other rooms she has been taken to and sounds that she could have heard.
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Scarlet and Ivy: Significant Moments in the Story

Scarlet and Ivy: Significant Moments in the Story

With a partner work on the graph below: 1. To begin this work you first of all need to discuss how you both feel about Ivy and Scarlet in each of the situations taken from the novel that are presented in the boxes. 2. Looking at your result do you empathise with one of the twins more than the other? Why do you think that is?
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Scarlet and Ivy: Describing the Setting

Scarlet and Ivy: Describing the Setting

Thinking about the sense of place, work with a partner to complete this task. a) Does the writer want us to like or dislike the place? Give a reason for your response. b) Why does the writer want the reader to recognise: the size of the place? What words or phrases do you think emphasise this?
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Scarlet and Ivy Pre-reading

Scarlet and Ivy Pre-reading

Think about mystery stories and poems that you have already read or listened to and films with elements of mystery that you have watched. What ingredients (features) do you expect to find in the mystery story that you are about to read? Put your ideas in the text boxes below. Add more boxes if you need to. When finished compare your ideas with a partner.
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Jekyll & Hyde- Language Focus

Jekyll & Hyde- Language Focus

2 lessons for a higher ability class. These quick paced lessons are highly structured so that students must complete a certain amount of activities in the lesson, and tick off their achievements as they go. Language analysis is the focus, with an extract from Jekyll and Hyde. The two lessons cover: - Comprehension - Analysis of authorial methods - Model paragraph - Extended critical writing - Analysis of sentence forms A homework activity is also included. Print the first 3 slides for activity sheets.
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KS3- Treasure Island

KS3- Treasure Island

Great for a high ability KS3 class, these 4-5 lessons look at an extract from Treasure Island and build skills in: - Language analysis - Identifying language techniques - Creative writing - Peer and self marking. A good introduction if you're starting to look at 19th century texts with younger groups. Enjoy!
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