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Crash Course Computer Science #39 Educational Technology Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #39 Educational Technology Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Today we’re going to go a little meta and talk about how computer science can support learning with educational technology. We here at Crash Course are big fans of interactive in-class learning and hands-on experiences, but we also believe in the additive power of educational technology inside and outside the classroom from the Internet itself and Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs to AI driven intelligent tutoring systems and virtual reality. (Crash Course Synopsis: 11:51) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment Video Link Included
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Crash Course Computer Science #38 Psychology of Computing Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #38 Psychology of Computing Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin We’ve spent most of this series talking about computers. Which makes sense - this is Crash Course COMPUTER SCIENCE after all. But at their core computers are tools employed by humans and humans are pretty complicated. So today, we’re going to discuss some psychological considerations in building computers like how to make them easier for humans to use, the uncanny valley problem when humanoid robots gets more and more humanlike, and strategies to make our devices work better with us by incorporating our emotions and even altering our gaze. Oh, and we'll talk about Carrie Anne's all time favorite user interface design principle - knurling. (Crash course Synopsis 12:38) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
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Crash Course Computer Science #37 Robots Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #37 Robots Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Today we're going to talk about robots! Robots are often thought as a technology of the future, but they're already here by the millions in the workplace, our homes, and pretty soon on the roads. We'll discuss the origins of robotics to its proliferation, and even look at some common control designs that were implemented to make them more useful in the workplace. Robots are often thought of as a menace or danger to society, and although there definitely is the propensity for malicious uses, robots also have the potential to drastically improve the world. (Crash course Synopsis 12:25) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
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Crash Course Computer Science #36 Natural Language Processing Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #36 Natural Language Processing Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Today we’re going to talk about how computers understand speech and speak themselves. As computers play an increasing role in our daily lives there has been an growing demand for voice user interfaces, but speech is also terribly complicated. Vocabularies are diverse, sentence structures can often dictate the meaning of certain words, and computers also have to deal with accents, mispronunciations, and many common linguistic faux pas. The field of Natural Language Processing, or NLP, attempts to solve these problems, with a number of techniques we’ll discuss today. And even though our virtual assistants like Siri, Alexa, Google Home, Bixby, and Cortana have come a long way from the first speech processing and synthesis models, there is still much room for improvement. (Crash course Synopsis 11:49) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
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Crash Course Computer Science #31 Cybersecurity Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #31 Cybersecurity Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Cybersecurity is a set of techniques to protect the secrecy, integrity, and availability of computer systems and data against threats. In today’s episode, we’re going to unpack these three goals and talk through some strategies we use like passwords, biometrics, and access privileges to keep our information as secure, but also as accessible as possible. From massive Denial of Service, or DDos attacks, to malware and brute force password cracking there are a lot of ways for hackers to gain access to your data, so we’ll also discuss some strategies like creating strong passwords, and using 2-factor authentication, to keep your information safe. (Crash course Synopsis 12:29) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
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Crash Course Computer Science #33 Cryptography Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #33 Cryptography Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Today we’re going to talk about how to keep information secret, and this isn’t a new goal. From as early as Julius Caesar’s Caesar cipher to Mary, Queen of Scots, encrypted messages to kill Queen Elizabeth in 1587, theres has long been a need to encrypt and decrypt private correspondence. This proved especially critical during World War II as Allan Turing and his team at Bletchley Park attempted to decrypt messages from Nazi Enigma machines, and this need has only grown as more and more information sensitive tasks are completed on our computers. So today, we’re going to walk you through some common encryption techniques such as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange, and RSA which are employed to keep your information safe, private, and secure. Note: In October of 2017, researchers released a viable hack against WPA2, known as KRACK Attack, which uses AES to ensure secure communication between computers and network routers. The problem isn't with AES, which is provably secure, but with the communication protocol between router and computer. In order to set up secure communication, the computer and router have to agree through what's called a "handshake". If this handshake is interrupted in just the right way, an attacker can cause the handshake to fault to an insecure state and reveal critical information which makes the connection insecure. As is often the case with these situations, the problem is with an implementation, not the secure algorithm itself. Our friends over at Computerphile have a great video on the topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYtvj... (Crash course Synopsis 12:32) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
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Crash Course Computer Science #35 Computer Vision Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #35 Computer Vision Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin "Today we’re going to talk about how computers see. We’ve long known that our digital cameras and smartphones can take incredibly detailed images, but taking pictures is not quite the same thing. For the past half-century, computer scientists have been working to help our computing devices understand the imagery they capture, leading to advancements everywhere, from tracking hands and whole bodies, biometrics to unlock our phones, and eventually giving autonomous cars the ability to understand their surroundings." (Crash Course Synopsis 11:09) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
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Scratch Games Design for Computer Science

Scratch Games Design for Computer Science

This is a whole unit of work with a variety of different lessons which aims to take students from basic understanding of the Scratch coding environment to students who develop games. Differentiated resource with clear instructions and challenging advanced activities for students who are capable
PaperAirplane
6 E-Safety Assemblies or Lessons for Primary Internet Safety

6 E-Safety Assemblies or Lessons for Primary Internet Safety

This a bundle of the 6 popular internet safety assemblies and/or lessons that I currently have in my shop. They are ideal for Safer Internet Day or at any other time of the year. The sessions cover: *Social media *Online gaming and digital citizenship *Online 'stranger danger' *General internet safety *Cyberbullying *Digital footprints The PowerPoints can be used for whole school or year group assemblies, but the included planning and independent activities also make them ideal for class teaching. Several of the sessions have KS1 and KS2 versions, but all can be adapted to different age groups. Please note: some video links are included in the sessions, which should always be assessed for suitability prior to use! Includes: • 6 PowerPoint presentations, covering all key teaching points • Full planning for all 6 sessions • All worksheets and activity support resources These resources support the following objectives from the UK computer science curriculum: KS1: 'Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.' KS2: 'Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.' Please see the Goldtopfox shop for more great e-safety and general teaching resources: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/goldtopfox
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Three E-Safety Assemblies or Lessons for Primary Internet Safety (Bundle 2)

Three E-Safety Assemblies or Lessons for Primary Internet Safety (Bundle 2)

This is my second bundle of three e-safety assemblies and lessons for primary schools. They are ideal for Safer Internet Day or at any other time of the year. The sessions cover: *Social media *Online gaming and digital citizenship *Online 'stranger danger' The PowerPoints can be used for whole school or year group assemblies, but the included planning and independent activities also make them ideal for class teaching. Please note: some video links are included in the sessions, which should always be assessed for suitability prior to use! Includes: • 3 PowerPoint presentations, covering all key teaching points • Full planning for all 3 sessions • All worksheets and activity support resources These resources support the following objectives from the UK computer science curriculum: KS1: 'Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.' KS2: 'Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.' Please see the Goldtopfox shop for more great e-safety and general teaching resources: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/goldtopfox
goldtopfox